Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our suggestions for the best art exhibitions you don't want to miss

Read more

Must-see art exhibitions

Art

Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

Read more
Art

Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

Read more
Art

Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

Read more
See more of the best art exhibitions

Current art exhibition reviews

Art

“Stuart Davis: In Full Swing”

As generally understood, the history of 20th-century art in America is treated like a Superman epic in which a mild-mannered provincial backwater transforms itself into the heroic art capital of the world. There is some truth to this: Thanks to its overwhelming triumph in 1945, the United States became the world’s most powerful nation—and, as we all know, history is written by the victors, and that includes art history. But this story, like so many, tends to miss the nuances that drove developments. With its survey of Stuart Davis (1892–1964), the Whitney fills in an important blank. Davis was born into an artistic family: His father was art editor of The Philadelphia Press and his mother a sculptor. Both were personally acquainted with the painters of the Ashcan School, and Davis’s childhood exposure to their stylistic mix of Impressionism and Social Realism led him to study with Robert Henri, one of the movement’s key figures. Two developments, however, altered the course of Davis’s career. The first was the famed Armory Show of 1913, where the young Davis encountered Fauvism and Cubism. The second was the rise of the first true consumer economy after World War I. The former provided him a stylistic template, while the latter, in the form of advertising, household products and other Jazz Age enticements, served as inspiration. Davis Americanized European modernism by combining it with the syncopated cultural rhythms and nascent pop culture of the Roaring ’20s. Cubism con

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

Asger Jorn, “The Open Hide”

Though lauded by American-art historian T.J. Clark as “the greatest painter of the 1950s,” Danish artist Asger Jorn (1914–1973) has remained under the radar outside of Europe. A cofounder of the short-lived CoBrA movement—which emphasized process over product and “uncivilized” style over outwardly serious content—Jorn was also associated with the Situationist International, the influential group that sought to disassemble capitalism’s illusory “society of the spectacle.” Yet what this compact but enthralling selection of paintings and prints reveals above all is an electrifying talent possessed of a freedom and wit sometimes lacking in Jorn’s modernist peers. The works are marked by a vivid expressionistic technique and an antic iconography in which wayward humanity confronts the wilds of nature. Titles like Bird Observing a Flock of Dumbuggers: naughty picture, No. 3 offer a taste of Jorn’s infectious irreverence, as does his readiness to paint over extant works or depict himself with the body of Edvard Eriksen’s iconic statue of Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid—a Copenhagen tourist attraction that suffered beheading at the hands of Situationist pranksters in 1964. The scale of these works may be modest, but their fluid aesthetic and mischievous experimental energy are anything but.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

Ed Atkins

In recent years, contemporary art has achieved a homogeneity of spirit thanks mainly to money and global connectivity—a state of affairs that finds its highest expression in the myriad art fairs wandering the planet, as indistinguishable from each other as airports. Yet paradoxically, artists still fall into the national character of their country of origin, something I’ve noticed of U.K. artists (Damien Hirst, particularly), in ways that are often annoying. Call it rank prejudice if you’d like, but this solo outing of London artist Ed Atkins does nothing to change my mind. But first, let me contradict myself a bit by allowing that the offerings here—three different video installations on as many floors—are impressive as spectacles. Starring computer-generated avatars voiced by Atkins, they resemble video games and involve the same sort of world-building. But unlike Halo, say, there’s no propelling narrative, just a nightmarish circularity. Disquisitions on a specifically 21st-century nihilism, the works occasionally crackle with dark humor and spooky effects but otherwise left me wanting. Speaking of airports, their role as alienating way stations provides the metaphorical underpinning for Safe Conduct on the top floor. Three panels, each consisting of four enormous flat screens, are joined into a triangular configuration suspended overhead like an arrival/departure board. Instead of flight numbers, it displays a surreal loop of imagery that includes empty baggage carousel

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

“Philip Guston: The Painter 1957–1967”

Around 1970, Philip Guston, a first-generation Abstract Expressionist, began painting darkly comic figurative canvases that captured the existential angst of the Vietnam era and influenced countless later artists. That legendary transformation makes it impossible to see this impressive exhibition of transitional, nominally abstract paintings—created between 1957 and 1965—without thinking about what came next. Guston’s customary interlocking multi hued forms in the 1959 Painter coalesce into an awkward bipedal scaffolding topped with a peaked scarlet cap that extends toward a crescent swath of sky blue—uncannily presaging his cartoonish self-portraits as a hooded Klansman, smoking and painting. In Garden of M (1960), overlapping ovoids in black and kidney-bean red foreshadow his testicular cyclopean heads of the mid-1970s. Merging the gestural agitation propounded by Willem de Kooning with the enveloping moody color of Mark Rothko, these paintings embody a kind of oceanic alienation. But they also appear to mark a wiping of the slate for Guston, clearing the way for his emergence as a paladin of anxious representation.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more

Upcoming art exhibitions

Art

“Bruce Conner: It’s All True”

Conner (1933–2008) is among the most important postwar artists you’ve probably never heard of. A pioneer of the West Coast scene and an early practitioner of found-object assemblage, he delved into rise of consumerist culture and fears of nuclear armageddon during the height of the Cold War. His work encompasses painting painting, sculpture, photography, performance and film. With respect to the last, his 1958 classic, A Movie, employed rapid-edit montages of appropriated TV commercials and movie footage put to an musical soundtrack; the darkly ironic result was startlingly ahead of it time. This show—the artist’s first monographic museum exhibition in New York, the first large survey of his work in 16 years and the first complete retrospective of his 50-year career—brings together over 250 examples of his groundbreaking work.

Read more
Art

“The Keeper”

This show unpacks the impulse to collect in all of its manifestations, from proper institutional holdings to obsessive individual hoarding. Assemblages, imaginary museums and other works explore the mechanics of display while pondering what is worth hanging on to and what is not.

Read more
Art

Kai Althoff

A dreamy, surreal amalgam of Expressionist and Symbolist tropes characterizes the art of this German artist who works in multiple mediums, including ceramics, weaving, drawing, painting and sculpture. His creations range from discrete objects to room-size installations that seem to grow out of the artist’s fantasies, reveries and personal memories. The term unique is too often applied to artists, but in the case of Althoff’s oeuvre, the label fits perfectly. Some 200 works spanning Althoff’s career is brought together in this survey, his first in an American museum.

Read more
Art

Agnes Martin

Along with Georgia O’Keeffe, Martin (1912–2004) is arguably the most important women artists in American art history, and certainly one of the most important painters of the 20th century, period. Her compositions utilized geometric grids, bands and lines, usually rendered in soft, subtle colors to create diaphanous objects of contemplation. She’s usually hailed as a forerunner of Minimalism, but she considered herself an Abstract Expression, who, like Barnett Newman, meditated on the nature of vision and perception. This retrospective is the first comprehensive career survey since her death.

Read more

Most popular art stories

Art

Artist Jim Shaw talks sexy tinker bell and The Seven Deadly sins

With his first NYC retrospective at the New Museum, the L.A. artist talks about his visionary work

Read more
Art

Check out the top 25 sculptures at MoMA

Take our tour of the works that wrote the book on modern and contemporary art in 3-D

Read more
Art

The 100 best paintings in New York

Leading artists, gallery owners, curators and critics pick the best paintings to be seen in NYC

Read more
Art

New York's quirkiest museums

Check out these oddities in the city’s strangest and perhaps most interesting museums and attractions

Read more

Best art galleries in New York

Art

Best Chelsea galleries

Read more
Art

Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

Read more
Art

Best photography galleries

Read more
Art

Best art galleries on 57th Street

Read more
See more New York art galleries

Latest art news

Blog

You can take a selfie in front of vintage NYC photos at the Museum of The City of New York

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and experience the New York of 50, 75 or 100 years ago, revisiting places like Times Square, Coney Island and the Brooklyn Bridge as they once were? Well, you can. Sort of. As part of its “Lost in Old New York” exhibition of vintage NYC photos, the Museum of The City of New York has set up enlarged versions of some of the images from the show as selfie backdrops for visitors. Take a picture of yourself strolling past the window at Bergdorf Goodman around mid-century, or at Coney circa 1900. If you post the result on social media, you’ll have a chance to win a free membership to the museum. Check out some examples below. The past is beckoning, so go get lost in it.     Did you come and get #LostinOldNY this weekend? Our Director of Exhibitions Installation traveled back to the original Penn Station to admire the Beaux-Arts architecture. Our first floor is now filled with scenes of New York City as it was way back when, and you can put yourself into them! Why not visit the newly opened Brooklyn Bridge? Or the 1939 World's Fair? Thanks to the magic of #LostinOldNY you can! Plus if you post your image using #LostinOldNY you’ll be entered into a monthly drawing for a free museum membership! A photo posted by Museum of the City of New York (@museumofcityny) on May 31, 2016 at 5:15am PDT   I think this is what they call vintage shopping. #lostinoldny #vintage #bergdorfgoodman A photo posted by Jennifer Bautista (@jenn.baut

Read more
Blog

The 10 craziest-looking buildings in New York

From Uptown and Midtown to Chelsea and the LES, we run down the craziest buildings

Read more
Blog

See photos of the brand new International Center for Photography

The ICP will open the doors of it brand new home Thursday at 250 Bowery

Read more
Blog

Check out cool street art from the 7th Annual Welling Court Mural Project in Queens

The Project covers a multi-block section along Welling Court in Astoria

Read more
See more on the blog

New York art in pictures

Art

The top 50 New York photographs

We round up iconic depictions of NYC moments high and low

Read more
Art

Mary Ellen Mark’s best NYC street photography

To honor Mark and her work, we take a look back at her most stunning New York-set shots

Read more
Art

See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

Read more
Art

See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

Read more

Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Read more
Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Read more
Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Read more
Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

Read more
See more New York museums