Public art on the High Line

The elevated park also doubles as an art space---check out the installations on view this summer.

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<p>Spencer Finch, <em>The River That Flows Both Ways</em></p>

Spencer Finch, The River That Flows Both Ways

The High Line is open daily 7am--10pm. Locations, dates and times subject to change; for more information and updates on events, call 212-206-9922 or visit thehighline.org (unless otherwise noted).

Stephen Vitiello, A Bell for Every Minute
The title of this piece is somewhat self-explanatory: Various chimes around the city, including the New York Stock Exchange bell and the United Nations' Peace Bell, ring out literally every minute. The disparate noises come together in a chaotic tintinnabulation at the top of every hour. (Check out our video of the installation to hear the noise.) 14th Street Passage, enter at Tenth Ave and W 14th St. Through June 2011.

Spencer Finch, The River That Flows Both Ways
The seemingly random arrangement of glass panes that make up this installation is actually quite precise. To prepare for the piece, Finch spent more than 11 hours on the Hudson River and photographed its surface every minute; he then took those images, which captured the river's activity over the course of a day, and translated them into the pattern that's meant to evoke the Hudson's movement from day to night. Chelsea Market Passage, enter at Tenth Ave and W 16th St. Ongoing.

Kim Beck, Space Available
Beck's sculptures present a sort of optical illusion: The pieces, which are installed on the roofs of three buildings surrounding the High Line, resemble the metal frames of billboards; however, when viewed from another angle, it becomes apparent that the sculptures are actually flat. Walk along the length of the park to see the pieces from all sides. Various locations around the High Line. Through Jan 2012.

Julianne Swartz, Digital Empathy
Don't be surprised if you hear a random voice while using one of the park's loos this summer: For her upcoming sound installation, artist Julianne Swartz arranged for computer-generated voices to emanate from points throughout the park (including its elevators and bathroom sinks), offering advice and encouraging words. Various locations on the High Line. June 2011--May 2012.

Sarah Sze, Occupancy-Abundance Equations
Sze's large steel-and-aluminum frame will stand at the juncture of the first and second sections of the High Line. Enter at Tenth Ave and W 20th St. June 2011--May 2012.

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