Ten must-see things at American Museum of Natural History

Wanna get in and get out? Here's how to do it.

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  • Dynamic Earth Globe, Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth

  • The Dzanga-Sangha rainforest diorama in the Hall of Biodiversity

  • The Blue Whale, Milstein Hall of Ocean Life

  • Giant Sequoia, North American Forests

  • Dioramas, North American Mammals

  • Chinese Wedding Chair, Gardner D. Stout Hall of Asian Peoples

  • Colossal Olmec Head, Mexico and Central America

  • The Reticulated Python, Reptiles and Amphibians

  • Tyrannosaurus Rex, Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

  • Pterosaur skeletons, Hall of Vertebrate Origins

Dynamic Earth Globe, Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth

Dynamic Earth Globe, Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth
Take a seat in the granite amphitheater and see earth from an alien's POV on this massive projected globe. A 12-minute video reveals clouds, oceans, continents and more.

The Dzanga-Sangha Rainforest, Hall of Biodiversity
This diorama replicates one of the most biodiverse forests on the planet and stresses the importance of conservsation.

The Blue Whale, Milstein Hall of Ocean Life
This 94-foot fiberglass mammal, suspended in air, reminds us of the larger mysteries of the sea.

Giant Sequoia, North American Forests
It took more than 1,300 years for the giant to grow and 13 days to cut it down. This slice came from a Sequoia that was 331 feet tall and measured 90 feet around the base of the trunk.

Dioramas, North American and African Mammals
These habitat dioramas capture mountain lions, jaguars and grizzly bears (oh my!) and set them against magnificent landscapes painted primarily by James Perry Wilson.

Chinese Wedding Chair, Gardner D. Stout Hall of Asian Peoples
This colorful 20th-century wedding chair—made of wood, kingfisher feathers, copper wire, gilt and glass—is the ultimate bridal accessory.

Colossal Olmec Head, Mexico and Central America
This enormous, helmeted head may be a plaster replica of one of the largest, heaviest and most impressive pouts ever made, but it still has the power to stop you in your tracks.

The Reticulated Python, Reptiles and Amphibians
Coiled around a tree, this 25-foot-long snake is bone-chilling, to say the least.

Tyrannosaurus Rex, Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs
At 65 million years old, the fossilized bones of the original thunder thighs are arranged in a walking position.

Pterosaur skeletons, Hall of Vertebrate Origins
If you're afraid of birds, you ain't seen nothing yet. With more than triple the armspan of Michael Phelps, these vertebrates' wings were formed around a greatly elongated fourth finger.

American Museum of Natural History

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