Things to do near the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Find great events, activities and attractions near the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Store sale

Critics' pick

Design lovers shouldn't skip out on this sale, where you can shop 50 percent off select items at the Met’s store. Highlights include Herakles knot link bracelets, halved from $150 to $75, Art Color Magic wall clocks (were $95, now $47) and decorative Adolf Dehn Spring in Central Park tea towels, nicked from $40 to $20.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Store, Upper East Side Until Saturday January 31 2015

"Cubism"

Critics' pick

These 80 paintings, collages, drawings and sculptures from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection—all promised gifts to the Met—represent the first time they have been shown in public, offering an opportunity to revisit the seminal early-20th-century movement through the taste of one patron. The contributing artists make up a mighty quartet of Braque, Gris, Léger and Picasso.   

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Monday February 16 2015

"Thomas Struth: Photographs"

Critics' pick

These 25 photos by Struth, dating from 1978 to the present, are exemplary of the German artist's panoramic, empirical treatment of subjects, which range here from deserted New York streets to a robotically assisted surgery in progress.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Monday February 16 2015

"El Greco in New York"

Critics' pick

Romantics and Modernists alike treasured the old master El Greco (1541–1614) for the skewed perspectives and strangely distorted figures that fill his paintings—that is, when they weren’t blaming those aesthetic quirks on drugs, madness, or astigmatism. For the 400th anniversary of his death, three New York institutions have gathered their substantial holdings of the painter’s works—at 19 paintings, more than anywhere outside of the Prado in Madrid!—in two concise exhibitions. While “El Greco at the Frick Collection” comprises three canvases, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “El Greco in New York” features contributions from the Hispanic Society of America, as well as its own collection. The larger Met show allows us to trace the artist’s trajectory. Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos in Crete, then a Venetian possession, El Greco painted Byzantine icons before leaving to study in Italy. The early Christ Healing the Blind, ca. 1570, a fairly typical late-Renaissance religious scene, shows the influence of his artistic training in Venice in its impressive if imperfect approximation of the modes of artists such as Veronese. In 1577, El Greco moved permanently to Spain. Subsequent devotional pictures show the artist’s increasing mastery of Renaissance idiom. Christ Carrying the Cross, ca. 1580–85 (watery-eyed, but with a perfect manicure), and The Holy Family, ca. 1585 (the Madonna charming, with an up-do and a gauzy mantilla; the nursing baby Jesus beady-eyed, with an oddly shaped h

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

Wang Jianwei, Time Temple

Critics' pick

Installation, painting, film and live theater are all part of this Chinese artist’s exhibition, his first in America and the first of three major works commissioned by the Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative for the Guggenheim. The piece, which will become part of the Gugg’s permanent collection, is the latest example of the artist’s ongoing examination of social order and the individual’s relationship to it. His work also often alludes to China’s modern history.

Read more
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Upper East Side Until Monday February 16 2015

"El Greco at the Frick Collection"

Critics' pick

Romantics and Modernists alike treasured the old master El Greco (1541–1614) for the skewed perspectives and strangely distorted figures that fill his paintings—that is, when they weren’t blaming those aesthetic quirks on drugs, madness, or astigmatism. For the 400th anniversary of his death, three New York institutions have gathered their substantial holdings of the painter’s works—at 19 paintings, more than anywhere outside of the Prado in Madrid!—in two concise exhibitions. While “El Greco at the Frick Collection” comprises three canvases, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “El Greco in New York” features contributions from the Hispanic Society of America, as well as its own collection. The larger Met show allows us to trace the artist’s trajectory. Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos in Crete, then a Venetian possession, El Greco painted Byzantine icons before leaving to study in Italy. The early Christ Healing the Blind, ca. 1570, a fairly typical late-Renaissance religious scene, shows the influence of his artistic training in Venice in its impressive if imperfect approximation of the modes of artists such as Veronese. In 1577, El Greco moved permanently to Spain. Subsequent devotional pictures show the artist’s increasing mastery of Renaissance idiom. Christ Carrying the Cross, ca. 1580–85 (watery-eyed, but with a perfect manicure), and The Holy Family, ca. 1585 (the Madonna charming, with an up-do and a gauzy mantilla; the nursing baby Jesus beady-eyed, with an oddly shaped h

Read more
The Frick Collection, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

"Bartholomeus Spranger: Splendor and Eroticism in Imperial Prague"

Critics' pick

As Old Masters go, Spranger (1546–1611) is not terribly well-known, but the force of his work as court painter to popes, cardinals and the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II is undeniable, as is the sexual undercurrent of his nude subjects.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

"Masterpieces from the Scottish National Gallery"

Critics' pick

Botticelli’s The Virgin Adoring the Sleeping Christ Child and John Singer Sargent’s portrait Lady Agnew of Lochnaw are just two of the treasures that have traveled to the Frick from one of the U.K.’s signature institutions.

Read more
The Frick Collection, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

"Madame Cézanne"

Critics' pick

Although Paul Cézanne’s wife was his most frequently painted subject, she’s been given short shrift by art historians, who have tended to focus on the artist’s still lifes, landscapes and figurative studies of bathers. As a remedy, the Met gathers paintings, drawings and watercolors, featuring Hortense Fiquet (the spouse in question), from its collection, as well as from others in Asia, Europe and the United States.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday March 15 2015

"Warriors and Mothers: Epic Mbembe Art"

Critics' pick

The Met brings together wood carvings created between the 17th and 19th centuries by the Mbembe people of southeastern Nigeria. These artifacts, which could sometimes measure several feet in height, were believed to have originally adorned monumental drums used in spiritual ceremonies.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Monday September 7 2015

Djordje Ozbolt, "More paintings about poets and food"

Critics' pick

Born in Belgrade (while it was still in Yugoslavia), Ozbolt has called London home since the 1990s. Since then, he's established a reputation for creating paintings and sculpture featuring generous helpings of the bizarre and macabre. His work is a surreal stew of styles (both Western and not), brimming art-historical and pop-cultural references, as well as his takes on traditional genres such as landscape, portraiture and still life. All of it is occasionally spiced with passages of abstraction. The results are apiece with the contemporary vogue for mix-and-match painting, but Ozbolt's panache and technical skills set him apart. An allegorist of his own imagination, Ozbolt knows how to grab your attention.

Read more
Hauser & Wirth New York, Upper East Side Until Saturday February 21 2015 Free

"From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945–1952"

Critics' pick

The default assumption about Abstract Expressionism is that it was overwhelmingly white, straight and male. The Jewish Museum sets out to complicate that picture by revisiting the careers of Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, artists who were female and African-American, respectively. The show is worth a visit even if its premise is bogged down by identity politics’ propensity to reduce individuals to categories—here, gender and race. Society does much the same thing, though an exhibition title like “From the Margins” buys into these cultural prejudices more than it explodes them. AbEx was a broader and more diverse phenomenon than we allow but not because of what the people involved happened to be but rather because of who they were—in this instance, artists rooted in European modernism, trying to find their way within a postwar order that had fallen into America’s lap. Their styles are well matched, with compositions both dense and finely rendered. There’s no attacking the canvas, à la Pollock and De Kooning, no swallowing the viewer in overweening gestalt à la Rothko and Newman. Yet Krasner’s and Lewis’s efforts were just as vital, and the opportunity to see their work provides a necessary correction to the standard historical narrative. Pollock’s wife, Krasner, was interested in the power of language. While a few of her works resemble Pollock’s drips in miniature, her paintings are mostly patterned with glyphs that, however indecipherable, boil written meaning down to an ab

Read more
The Jewish Museum, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

Winter Antiques Show

Critics' pick

History buffs have 73 booths of decorative housewares, furniture and tableaux to riffle through at this vintage art and antiques fair. Take a look at some hard-core antique-armour from collector Peter Finer. Those obsessed with kittens can gawk at one of the oldest pieces—an Egyptian bronze seated cat (715–332 B.C) believed to be used to hold a mummified feline. There are also daily lectures, events and book signings, which have salacious titles such as “Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life”. Entrance proceeds benefit East Side House Settlement, a community nonprofit in the Bronx. Go to winterantiquesshow.com for more information.

Read more
Park Avenue Armory, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

Cheyenne Jackson: Eyes Wide Open

Critics' pick

The almost comically hunky Cheyenne Jackson, star of Broadway (Xanadu) and TV (Glee), has recently scuffed up his image with tattoos and a minor sex scandal. We think we like him even more now. In his Carlyle debut, he employs songs ranging from Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga to examine "loss, love, revelation and recovery."

Read more
Café Carlyle (in the Carlyle Hotel), Upper East Side

Jonathan Biss

Critics' pick

A thoughtful, imaginative pianist who never coasts, Jonathan Biss continues his well-documented engagement with Beethoven's sonatas by playing Nos. 1 and 28. Intriguingly, the program also includes piano works by Second Viennese School composers Schoenberg and Berg, plus items by Schumann.

Read more
92Y, Kaufmann Concert Hall, Upper East Side Saturday January 24 2015

"Thomas Hart Benton's America Today Mural Rediscovered"

Critics' pick

Benton is generally known for being the crusty anti-Modernist teacher of Jackson Pollock, so it's somewhat ironic that his epic 10-panel mural, America Today, was commissioned in 1930 by New York’s New School for Social Research for the boardroom of its International Style building on West 12th Street. Even more ironic is the work's depiction of life during the country's explosively modern Jazz Age, though the painting was created at the onset of the Great Depression. Nevertheless, it is a classic of the mural form, and one of Benton's masterpieces. For years, the work was installed in the lobby of the old Equitable Building on Seventh Avenue; it was just recently donated to the Met by the AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company. It makes its debut here in its new, and presumably permanent, home.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday April 19 2015

Bettye LaVette

Critics' pick

In her riveting previous sets at the Carlyle, loved and lauded veteran soulstress Bettye LaVette has let her soul voice soar like a phoenix shaking its ash. Now she returns to wrap her gloriously ravaged tonsils around songs by the Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and more.

Read more
Café Carlyle (in the Carlyle Hotel), Upper East Side Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday February 7 2015

Shai Wosner & the Parker Quartet

Critics' pick

The Parkers and Israeli-American pianist Shai Wosner take turns during a program organized around "the Schubert effect." As on his excellent recent album, Wosner teases out a connection between the great composer and the postminimalist, contemporary-sound world of Missy Mazzoli (whose Isabelle Eberhardt Dreams of Pianos, for piano and electronics, is on the set list). For their part, the Parkers move between Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" quartet and Kurtág's Aus der Ferne V. On Feb 1, the players extend the series contrasting the Schubert's Moments musicaux for piano with the Kurtag composition of the same name (for string quartet). They join forces for Schubert's Quintet for Piano and Strings in A major.

Read more
92Y, Kaufmann Concert Hall, Upper East Side Wednesday January 28 2015 - Sunday February 1 2015

Vera Lutter

Critics' pick

Views of New York, including such iconic landmarks as the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, are the subjects of this German photographer's latest show. As usual, the works have been created using her trademark technique: Transforming an empty shipping container (or room) into a gigantic camera obscura. The results are equally huge, comprising negative images with a nightmarish, Twilight Zone vibe.

Read more
Gagosian Shop, Upper East Side Thursday January 29 2015 - Saturday March 7 2015 Free

Maya Beiser

Critics' pick

The cellist and Bang On A Can associate Maya Beiser presents a set titled "Beauty Is Power," which will include her interpretation of Anna Clyne's Rest These Hands, as well as the world premiere of Julia Wolfe's Emunah.

Read more
The Jewish Museum, Upper East Side Thursday January 29 2015

One Hundred Years of the War on Drugs

Critics' pick

After 100 years, the United States is still at war with drugs. But why? Journalist Johann Hari unpacks the issue, from the way it all began with the first narcotic-related arrests under the Harrison Act, to how the science of addiction came to be.

Read more
92nd Street Y, Upper East Side Friday January 30 2015

Ethel

Critics' pick

The contemporary-classical crusaders in this string quartet offer an early evening set tonight and one on Sat 31. The pieces have yet to be announced, but they've got plenty of ace works in their repertoire. And you can afford to take a chance on these gigs, given that they're free, after paying the museum's flexible admission.

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Friday January 30 2015 - Saturday January 31 2015

Jennifer Koh

Critics' pick

Poised, probing violinist Jennifer Koh presents the latest installment in her ongoing "Bach and Beyond" series, intermingling that composer's second and third sonatas for unaccompanied violin with modern and contemporary works: specifically, Berio's Sequenza VIII and the world premiere of John Harbison's For Violin Alone (the latter being a 92Y co-commission).

Read more
92Y, Kaufmann Concert Hall, Upper East Side Saturday January 31 2015

"On Kawara—Silence"

Critics' pick

Over the 40 year span of his career, On Kawara has been best known for his “Today” series of paintings, one created each day in a single day and bearing, simply, the date of its making. Starting in 1966, he’s maintained this daily practice even while traveling, marking the location of each place a painting was created by covering the back of the canvas with the front page of the local newspaper from the same day. However, as this Guggenheim retrospective demonstrates, he’s undertaken other projects as well, some involving postcards or maps. But all share the same deep commitment to concretely taking the measure of time and place. The survey is the first full presentation of his work ever undertaken.

Read more
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Upper East Side Friday February 6 2015 - Monday May 4 2015

Washington's Birthday Ball

Critics' pick

Families can celebrate the birth of our nation’s first president at a 19th-century-style ball. Come learn and perform traditional country dances, indulge in birthday refreshments and tour the museum. Ages 4 and up.

Read more
Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and Garden, Upper East Side Sunday February 15 2015
See all Things to do near the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Comments

0 comments