• Blog
  • Theater & Performance

Five shows to see during Broadway Week’s excellent two-for-one sale

Photograph: Joan Marcus
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder

As we noted two weeks ago, Broadway Week starts on Monday. Right now you can buy two tickets to several shows for the price of one. But they’re going fast. Here are our top picks from what’s still available. Remember, this is for performances Sept 1–14 only.

THE TIME OUT FAVORITE
A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder
The new undisputed king of musical comedy, this Edwardian romp is filled with zany sight gags and the wittiest show tunes in years. But the jewel in its crown is Jefferson Mays as a gargoylish gallery of twits, snobs and prigs. These scions and heirs to the D'Ysquith clan must fall so that distantly related Monty Navarro (Bryce Pinkham) can rise.

STILL IN PREVIEWS, BUT GREAT BUZZ
This Is Our Youth
Kenneth Lonergan's 1996 breakout play about a couple of late adolescents mixed up in stolen money and cocaine gets a belated Broadway debut, courtesy of Steppenwolf Theatre Company. The formidable Anna D. Shapiro directs Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin and Tavi Gavinson in the slacker drama.

THE CROWD-PLEASING LONG-RUNNER
Kinky Boots
Harvey Fierstein and Cyndi Lauper’s fizzy crowd-pleaser, in which a sassy-dignified drag queen kicks an English shoe factory into gear, feels familiar at every step. But it has been manufactured with solid craftsmanship and care,  and is boosted by a heart-strong cast led by Billy Porter. The overall effect is nigh irresistible.

BRING YOUR DAD OR UNCLE FROM TRENTON
Jersey Boys
The Broadway musical does right by the jukebox with this behind-the-music tale, presenting the Four Seasons’ energetic 1960s tunes (including “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry”) as they were meant to be performed.

THE FAMILY FAVORITE ADULTS CAN ENJOY
Matilda
Based on Roald Dahl's book about a child prodigy who must outwit horrid parents and a sadistic headmistress, this English musical delivers mischievous fun while hitting the requisite sentimental notes and smuggling in an antiauthoritarian message. Tim Minchin's cheeky Britpop score and Matthew Warchus's cartoonish staging combine for sheer delight.

For any feedback or for more information email

Comments

0 comments