Fall's 10 hottest restaurant and bar openings

The buzz is nearing fever pitch for these blockbuster debuts, including Saxon & Parole and a Torrisi expansion.

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  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Allswell

    Allswell
    After a short-lived stint at Prospect Heights eatery Dean Street, Spotted Pig alum Nate Smith takes on Williamsburg with this casual New American tavern. Smith will execute a menu of updated pub grub with an emphasis on seasonal veggies, like garlicky kale-stuffed pastry rounds, roasted meats and potted vegetables. The drinks list takes a locavore slant with small-production wines and craft beers on tap, plus a selection of market-driven cocktails. 124 Bedford Ave at North 10th St, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (347-799-2743). Early October.

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Bowery Diner

    The Bowery Diner
    Chef Mathieu Palombino made his name slinging some of the city's best Neapolitan-style pizzas at Motorino in Williamsburg and the East Village (the Brooklyn location recently shuttered). But when the Bowery Diner opens in September, the toque will turn from regional-Italian pies to classic Americana. The 140-seat space will feature quintessential diner elements: red booths, stainless steel paneling and a glass dessert case. Look for homemade doughnuts and coffee in the morning, and burgers, Reuben sandwiches and steak frites later in the day. 241 Bowery at Stanton St (212-388-0052). Mid-September.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Demi Monde

    Demi Monde
    Dave Kaplan and Alex Day, respectively a co-owner and former a barkeep of standard-bearing cocktail bar Death & Company, are behind this 120-seat drinkery and New American restaurant. Unlike the diminutive East Village haunt, this Financial District spot will have standing room and plenty of seats to spare. Classic cocktails are still the inspiration, but the pair will also experiment with cutting-edge techniques. To wit: For the Heads Up drink, Day plans to flash-infuse vermouth with watermelon, using a whipped-cream canister, and then mix the elixir with Aperol, acid phosphate and seltzer. The subterranean venue sits below an attached caf, serving coffee during the day. 90 Broad St at Stone St (no phone yet). Late November.

  • Photograph: Dietrich Gehring

    Fleisher's Grass-fed & Organic Meats

    Fleisher's Grass-fed & Organic Meats
    Since 2004, aspiring butchers (such as Tom Mylan of the Meat Hook) have been honing their carving chops at Joshua and Jessica Applestone's Kingston, New York, butcher shop and training center. This fall, the husband-and-wife team will set up an outpost in Park Slope, offering their pasture-raised beef and lamb, heritage pork and free-range, organic poultry to the Brooklyn masses. Also on offer: a range of house-made charcuterie, cold cuts and sausages, plus pantry staples like Ronnybrook Farm dairy and dried beans. 192 Fifth Ave between Sackett and Union Sts, Park Slope, Brooklyn (718-398-6666). Mid-September.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Frankies 570 Spuntino

    Frankies 570 Spuntino
    White-hot restaurateurs Frank Falcinelli and Frank Castronovo will expand their holdings with the third location of Frankies---their perpetually mobbed Italian tavern. The menu of rustic sandwiches, pastas and meat plates will mirror their other two locations, but diners can also choose from seasonal specials like creamy farro with grilled cotechino and poached egg. Complementing an 80-bottle Italian wine list (including a rotating draft selection), head barkeep Cabell Tomlinson will debut a menu of classic and creative cocktails. 570 Hudson St at 11th St (212-924-0818). Early September.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Mas (la grillade)

    Mas (la grillade)
    Chef Galen Zamarra's haute takes on seasonal fare gained a devoted following at Mas (farmhouse) in the West Village. Next up for Zamarra: a fire-based spin-off of the original a couple of blocks away. The locavore toque will source regional hardwoods for his open-flame grilling, spit-roasting and smoking. Choose from simple plates, like squid stuffed with bay leaves and langoustines over a smoked-tomato salad. Like the original, the 80-seat space nods to French farmhouses---here with white oak-wood paneling, a wrought-iron chandelier and handmade pottery lamps. 28 Seventh Ave South between Bedford and Leroy Sts (212-255-1795). Late September.

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Parm

    Parm
    Chefs Mario Carbone and Rich Torrisi shook up notions of Italian-American cuisine with their trailblazing restaurant Torrisi Italian Specialties---a thoughtful deli by day and a prix-fixe foodie destination by night. Soon the red-sauce revivalists will move their sandwich operations next door. The pair will bolster their menu of heros (like a stellar chicken Parm) with creative plates, such as fried peppers stuffed with provolone and rice, plus a list of riffs on classic cocktails. Meanwhile, their flagship restaurant will replace its daytime offerings with a prix-fixe lunch. 248 Mulberry St between Prince and Spring Sts (no phone yet). Early September.

  • Photograph: Courtesy Romera

    Romera

    Romera
    Neurologist-turned-chef Miguel Sanchez Romera, of Michelin-starred L'Esguard in Spain, will introduce some new culinary buzzwords (neurogastronomy, holistic dining) when his high-minded eatery debuts in the Dream Downtown. Plunk down $245 for the 12-course prix fixe (there are no la carte offerings) to get a taste of the cerebral toque's modernist food, including dishes like the Isis (pictured), a soup course of colorful vegetable powders arranged in a mosaic tile pattern and hydrated tableside with a seasonal-vegetable consomm. 355 W 16th St between Eighth and Ninth Aves (212-929-5800). Early September.

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Saxon & Parole

    Saxon & Parole
    Downtown-darling chef Brad Farmerie (Public) and design team AvroKO will install this globe-trotting grill---named for a pair of prizewinning racehorses---in the space that once housed their sleek British-Asian canteen, Double Crown. Farmerie will dispatch composed dishes: whole branzino stuffed with crab, Parmesan and smoked paprika; Heritage Farms USA roasted pork rack with purple-potato salad; and a New York strip steak with sherry-braised onions and bone-marrow barnaise sauce. Given the crew's pedigree, anticipate an eye-catching interior and a dazzling crowd to match. 316 Bowery at Bleecker St (212-254-0350). Late September.

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Veselka Bowery

    Veselka Bowery
    Since 1954, East Village revelers have been packing beloved 24-hour institution Veselka for its top-notch burgers and hearty Eastern European plates. In September, the owners will expand with this 125-seat outpost. The new space offers a modern interior decked out with polished concrete floors, long communal wood tables and hanging glass lights. But you'll still find all the classics---borscht, pierogi and blintzes---along with chefly revamps of traditional dishes. To drink, choose from 50 small-production vodkas. 9 E 1st St between Bowery and Second Ave (212-387-7000). Mid-September.

Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

Allswell

Allswell
After a short-lived stint at Prospect Heights eatery Dean Street, Spotted Pig alum Nate Smith takes on Williamsburg with this casual New American tavern. Smith will execute a menu of updated pub grub with an emphasis on seasonal veggies, like garlicky kale-stuffed pastry rounds, roasted meats and potted vegetables. The drinks list takes a locavore slant with small-production wines and craft beers on tap, plus a selection of market-driven cocktails. 124 Bedford Ave at North 10th St, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (347-799-2743). Early October.

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