Heirloom tomatoes

Look out for these varieties at your local farmers' market.

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  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    GERMAN STRIPE

    German Stipe
    These tricolored behemoths (always green, yellow and red) can grow up to five pounds on the vine. Very sweet and low in acid, they're best suited to salads.

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    GREAT WHITE

    Great White
    Don't be fooled by the light hue of this cultivar---their lack of color does not equal less flavor. Acidic, juicy and mild, they work well in salads.

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    GREEN ZEBRA

    Green Zebra
    These emerald-striped orbs will be quite acidic until September, when the cooler weather produces a more pronounced sweetness.

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    CHEROKEE PURPLE

    Cherokee Purple
    Favored in sandwiches for their firm flesh, these tomatoes are burgundy with a dark green blush on top. Choose the darkest ones you can find---the deeper color indicates sweeter flesh.

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    RAMAPO

    Ramapo
    Chefs favor these beefsteaklike rounds---named for a New Jersey region---for their high acidity, soft flesh and low water content.

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    BRANDYWINE

    Brandywine
    One of the most popular heirloom varieties, these hefty, pinkish-red beauties are ultrajuicy, and make for a great addition to a sandwich.

Photograph: Jolie Ruben

GERMAN STRIPE

German Stipe
These tricolored behemoths (always green, yellow and red) can grow up to five pounds on the vine. Very sweet and low in acid, they're best suited to salads.

Availability varies. We found these at Maxwell's Farm, located at Union Square Greenmarket (Mondays), Dag Hammarskjold Plaza Greenmarket (Wednesdays) and Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket (Saturdays).

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