'New Directors/New Films'

NYC's premier film festival for fresh talent has showcased early works by Steven Spielberg, Spike Lee and many, many more; check out TONY's coverage of "New Directors/New Films" and discover tomorrow's great moviemakers today.

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New Directors/New Films coverage

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New Directors/New Films 2013

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Past New Directors/New Films

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New Directors/New Films 2012

For those of us consistently scanning the cinematic horizon for fresh filmmaking talent, New Directors/New Films is a calendar-clearing event; at its best, this annual festival of neophytes and next-gen auteurs gives curious audiences a glimpse at future major players. Running through April 1 at both Film Society of Lincoln Center and Museum of Modern Art, the 41st edition of ND/NF promises to deliver another batch of ground-floor discoveries. Here are five you’ll want to check out. Gimme the LootThe Rodney Dangerfields of Gotham’s graffiti world, Malcolm and Sofia get no respect; all that will change, however, if this duo tags the Mets’ Home Run Apple at Citi Field. They just have to raise $500 first. Part caper comedy and part funky-fresh cityscape, Adam Leon’s debut feature hits a humanistic sweet spot, turning its two trash-talking Picassos into underdog heroes. And that last shot would make Ozu beam. (Fri 23 at 6:30pm, FSLC; Sun 25 at 2:30pm, MoMA)—DF Goodbye (Bé omid é didar)Facing possible imprisonment and a 20-year ban on filmmaking for “subversive activities,” Iranian director Mohammad Rasoulof (The White Meadows) did what most of us would do: quickly make a movie on the sly. This tale of a female lawyer (Leyla Zareh) in search of an exit visa for her political-dissident husband mirrors Rasoulof’s story to an alarming degree, and its portrayal of Iran as a gray wasteland run by government thugs is a case study in national paranoia. (Thu 22 at 8:30pm

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New Directors/New Films 2011

From Greek goddesses to British bastards, here are seven things to see in this year's next-gen showcase. Now in its 40th year—how time flies!—this annual festival returns to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Film Society of Lincoln Center (FSLC), once again shining the spotlight on new filmmakers' first big creative statements. Here's a septet of selections that you'll want to catch by any means necessary. AttenbergCall it The 22-Year-Old Virgin: Athina Rachel Tsangari's dryly humorous drama follows Marina (Ariane Labed), a sexually inexperienced young woman spending time with her dying father in a Greek industrial town. The film's observant imagery evokes David Attenborough's in-the-wild documentaries (the title is a play on the naturalist's name), casting Marina as a creature of animal instinct—especially in the ways she interacts with her best friend (Evangelia Randou) and a hirsute engineer (Dogtooth director Giorgios Lanthimos). Beneath the character's stoic surface, however, is a well of human emotion that is slowly, insightfully coaxed out.—KU (MoMA, Mar 31 at 6pm; FSLC, Apr 2 at 1pm)The Black Power Mixtape 1967--1975It's a truism that foreigners (see Frank, Robert) often view America with clearer eyes than its residents—a notion that Gran Olsson's compilation doc exemplifies with social consciousness to spare. During that nine-year time span, Swedish TV crews interviewed Civil Rights leaders, with clips ranging from Stokely Carmichael speechifying to an incarce

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New Directors/New Films 2010

New York's premier next-gen film festival highlights tomorrow's heavy hitters. Soderbergh, Haneke, Linklater, Wong Kar-wai, Almodvar, Spielberg (yes, that Spielberg)...these are just some of the big names that dot the “New Directors/New Films” alumni archive. For almost four decades, this annual (and already-in-progress) survey of up-and-coming auteurs, sponsored by MoMA and Film Society of Lincoln Center, has given viewers a glimpse of the future; here are five movies from this year’s edition that you’ll want to pay attention to. DogtoothMagnificently disturbing, Yorgos Lanthimos’s one-of-a-kind psychodrama takes place in a family’s walled-in estate, where three homeschooled kids give new meaning to the word sheltered. These randy teens have no concept of the outside world; left to their own warped language and rituals, they bring about their ruination. Is this a terror-shocked future? Or, obliquely, right now? (Tue 30 at 9pm at MoMA; Wed 31 at 6:15pm at FSLC)—JR Down TerraceBen Wheatley’s lo-fi tale of a suburban gangster clan has been described as “Mike Leigh directs The Sopranos,” but that doesn’t quite do this British indie justice. Blending black comedy, kitchen-sink dramatics and crime-flick conventions, this modest gem takes some serious sideways swipes at England’s class ceiling. Get Down, people. (Tue 30 at 9pm at MoMA; Wed 31 at 6:15pm at FSLC)—DF I Am LoveChanneling Visconti’s lusty lushness and Desplechin’s symphonic melodramas, Italian director Luca Guada

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