The 100 best animated movies: 10–1

World-famous animators pick the best animated movies ever, including Disney and Pixar movies, cult movies, kids movies, stop-motion, anime and more

10
1/10

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)

An idiosyncratic auteur gets animated with this stop-motion take on Roald Dahl’s children’s novel. Director: Wes Anderson Best quote: “Redemption? Sure. But in the end, he’s just another dead rat in a garbage pail behind a Chinese restaurant.” Defining moment: Fox and friends come face-to-face with a mysterious black wolf. It’s tough being a wild animal. Not that the witty, snappily dressed Mr. Fox (George Clooney) likes to complain about his days making life hell for his human nemeses, farmers Boggis, Bunce and Bean (one fat, one short, one lean). It’s in his nature, after all. But when Fox’s wife, Felicity (Meryl Streep), informs him that they have a pup on the way, our vulpine protagonist realizes he has to tame the beast within. Good luck.There’s nothing docile about Wes Anderson’s first foray into animation. Anderson’s dioramic visuals and pithy plotting translate perfectly to a cartoon world. You’re captivated right from the first gorgeously autumnal shot of Mr. Fox leaning against a tree, an image accompanied, in a very Andersonian touch, by the Wellingtons’ 1954 tune “The Ballad of Davy Crockett.”As with all of the director’s films, potent emotions underlie the comic-strip surface: Both Fox and his sullen son, Ash (Jason Schwartzman), must come to terms with their instinctual ambitions, which tend to clash with their everyday responsibilities. (The heart breaks when Felicity claws her husband’s furry face in frustration at his blithely destructive impulses.) As the foxes find their way of life increasingly threatened, the question arises: How do you use your nature to your advantage? The answers aren’t easy, but it should be clear that Anderson isn’t out to cater to anyone except the audience he knows so well.—Keith Uhlich  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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9
2/10

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

The film that made Christmas creepy. Director: Henry Selick Best quote: “Jack, you make wounds ooze and flesh crawl!” (It’s a compliment.) Defining moment: The opening song, gloriously and ghoulishly upbeat. It all started in 1982, with a poem written by Tim Burton, then a humble animator at Disney. A year later, Burton pitched A Nightmare Before Christmas to his bosses as a TV special. But the powers that be thought the idea “too weird,” and the project went on the back burner until Beetlejuice and Batman made Burton a hot property.Too weird? Not a bit. Burton’s graveyard fairy tale is a good old-fashioned musical, with song-and-dance numbers that would get Gene Kelly tapping his feet. It’s the story of Jack Skellington, the king of Halloween Town, who discovers a portal to Christmas Town and likes what he sees—children throwing snowballs instead of heads. No one is dead. Jack crafts a plan to kidnap Father Christmas, or Sandy Claws, as he calls him.Directed by stop-motion maestro Henry Selick from Burton’s story, the movie took 15 animators almost three years to make. Working with more than 227 puppets, they completed just one minute of the film a week. That translates into mind-boggling detail, right down to the mayor’s spider tie. The dialogue is deliciously macabre, the storytelling dizzyingly inventive and the characters touchingly sweet. A twisted delight.—Cath Clarke  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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8
3/10

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Not the first animated feature, but the start of the Disney empire. Directors: David Hand, William Cottrell, Wilfred Jackson, Larry Morey, Perce Pearce and Ben Sharpsteen Best quote: “Magic mirror on the wall…” Defining moment: Snow White’s headlong dash through the moonlit forest is expressionistic, beautiful and terrifying. They called it Disney’s folly. It took years and millions of dollars to produce Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and one huge question remained unanswered right up to the day of release: Would an audience really sit still for 83 minutes of cartoon antics? Of course, the movie was a huge hit, and kick-started Uncle Walt’s decades-long domination of the painted-cel scene. It may not have been the first feature-length animated film—that honor is held by Argentine animator Quirino Cristiani’s 1917 El Apóstol, though all copies have since been destroyed—but it was the first to receive a global release, and the first to wake up audiences (and producers) to the seemingly limitless potential of a brand-new medium.What makes Snow White truly special is not its success, however, but its originality: Working without a rule book, Disney and his animators created—fully formed—an entirely new genre. Just look at last year’s Frozen and ask yourself how far mainstream animation has actually developed: Snow White has a dashing fairy-tale heroine, a hunky but slightly dull dude, lovable pratfalling sidekicks, important life lessons, groundbreaking and gorgeous animation, whistleable tunes and, perhaps most notably, the greatest femme fatale in film history. It just goes to show: You can’t improve on perfection.—Tom Huddleston  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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7
4/10

The Iron Giant (1999)

The Ted Hughes novel came to Hollywood in a studio movie that broke technical and storytelling boundaries—if not box-office records. Director: Brad Bird Best quote: “I am not a gun.” Defining moment: The giant carries Hogarth in his hand, high above the treetops below. Before directing The Incredibles and Rataouille, animator Brad Bird made his feature debut with this charming, intelligent adaptation of the late 1960s Ted Hughes children’s story The Iron Man. Best known at the time for his work on The Simpsons, Bird moved the tale from Britain to 1950s Maine, lending it distinct Cold War flavor. A young boy, Hogarth (given the surname Hughes in honor of the poet, who died in 1998, a year before the film’s release), discovers a metallic giant in his hometown and fights to protect it from being pulverized by the military—while simultaneously teaching it how to live in peace on earth. The widescreen film has a streak of smart humor as well as a winning, harmonious worldview, and mixes computer animation and more traditional techniques: The CGI was mostly invested in rendering the giant as convincingly as possible, while traditional hand-drawn techniques were reserved for the humans. Visually, the film offers stunning moments without sacrificing a pleasingly old-fashioned air. It wasn’t a success at the box office, although it was hailed as a rare example of a family movie with heart and brains. Thankfully, Pixar gave Bird a chance to fly again.—Dave Calhoun  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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6
5/10

Dumbo (1941)

It ain’t easy being gray in one of Disney’s most simple, cute and memorable tales. Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, Samuel Armstrong, Norman Ferguson, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts and John Elliotte Best quote: “It ain’t nobody’s fault you got dem big ears.” Defining moment: Dumbo visits his caged mom at night and cuddles up to her trunk as it extends through the bars—all to the sound of the lullaby “Baby Mine.” Disney’s tender and moving fourth animated feature, Dumbo remains the company’s shortest. Its brevity and simplicity were born of necessity: Neither Pinocchio nor Fantasia had fared well at the box office, so the creators of Dumbo were tasked with keeping things short, sweet and cheap. Dumbo was based on a story line written for the prototype of a new toy—hardly the most poetic of origins—and tells of a baby elephant born to a single mother working in a traveling circus (the film’s early scenes of storks delivering baby animals did nothing for several generations of sex education). It has both energy—the building of the big top in the rain, the circus train chugging over the landscape—and heart: a piercingly sad story of a mother and child forcibly separated. The template is fairly straightforward, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for some memorable and inventive set pieces. The hallucinogenic, jazzy dance of the pink elephants when Dumbo accidentally gets drunk is a scene for the ages, while the climactic elephant pyramid, when little Dumbo becomes an unlikely hero, is both terrifying and triumphant.—Dave Calhoun  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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5
6/10

The Incredibles (2004)

A superheroic family tries to blend into their quiet suburban lifestyle, but realizes that their skills are nothing to be ashamed of. Director: Brad Bird Best quote: “When everyone’s super…no one will be.” Defining moment: “No capes!” declares Edna Mode, the film’s snooty fashionista, and we see the fates that befell some unlucky caped crusaders. Firing on all cylinders, Pixar’s first film to earn a PG rating signaled a grabbing of the brass ring: Yes, the studio’s computer animation was peerless, but could it also do marital malaise, middle-aged belly spread and sneakily ambitious philosophy—all of it tucked into spandex? Writer-director Brad Bird commanded a degree of control unprecedented since the days of old Walt himself. Everything was riding on his long-germinating vision of an exceptional family rediscovering its purpose. The plot’s spirit proved infectious, the reviews rapturous. Thematically, the movie’s deepest fear concerns the creeping slump of mediocrity: If greatness lies within us, why can’t we let it out? Maybe it’s because we’re told—in subtle ways—not to shine too brightly and make others feel inadequate. Some pegged the notion as straight out of Ayn Rand (this would have been her favorite movie ever), but the idea was somehow made to feel inclusive via Bird’s humor, panache and narrative clarity. The Incredibles makes us believe in heroes, but more importantly, it reclaims the virtue of heroism itself: a blessing, an ideal, an ambition. And it’s not easy.—Joshua Rothkopf  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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4
7/10

Toy Story (1995)

Cowboy or spaceman—which is Andy’s favorite plaything? And how do these secretly alive toys feel about that? Director: John Lasseter Best quote: “To infinity…and beyond!” Defining moment: The elaborate escape from evil Sid’s room, a breathtaking action sequence that put Hollywood’s A-list to shame. Nothing less than the first shot in what would become a revolution, John Lasseter’s simple tale turned adults into happy children, naysayers into believers, and computer animation into the dominant expression of an entire industry. Pixar’s debut feature is its most beautiful thing, emphasis on thing: The genius idea here was to embrace the stuff of toys—to imbue plastic and cloth with solidity and tactility. Suddenly there was a real weight to billions of bits and bytes, and audiences were enraptured. Naturally, none of this would have worked had there not been a killer script, labored upon for years by a creative team that included Lasseter and future directors Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton and The Avengers’ Joss Whedon. The humanity imparted by Tom Hanks as the passed-over Woody can’t be understated: This was a role rich enough to lure the hottest actor in the game. Toy Story speaks to our love of play, and the way we invest our dolls and action figures with the souls of whom we want to become. It makes sense that these toys would keep dreaming even when put away for the night. But the film’s lasting impact is simpler than that: Swinging, bouncing or skidding, toys are alive in our minds. Lasseter’s team bent gravity itself to make that a reality.—Joshua Rothkopf  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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3
8/10

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

Miyazaki proves he has the heart of a child, the eye of a painter and the soul of a poet. Director: Hayao Miyazaki Best quote: “Trees and people used to be good friends.” Defining moment: The first appearance of the roving cat-bus will have viewers of all ages gasping in delight. Some filmmakers build their great artworks with blood, sweat and toil. Japanese master Hayao Miyazaki seems to sprout his from seeds, planting them in good earth and patiently watering them until they burst into bloom. My Neighbor Totoro is the gentlest, most unassuming film on this list, a tale of inquisitive children, mischievous dust fairies, magical trees and shy sylvan creatures. But in its own quietly remarkable way, it’s also one of the richest and most overwhelming.This is a story whose roots go deep: into Japanese tradition and culture, into its creator’s personal past, into a collective childhood filled with tales of mystery and a love of all things that grow. There is darkness at the film’s heart—the fear of losing a parent, the loneliness and frustration of childhood—but its touch is gossamer-light, delighting in simple pleasures like raindrops on an umbrella, dust motes drifting in the sun and midnight dances in the garden. The visual style is unmistakably Japanese (unadorned and artful) and the theme song is so sugary-chirrupy-sweet that it’s impossible to dislodge once heard. But the cumulative effect is unique and utterly all-encompassing, returning us to a world we have all, at one time, lived in—and perhaps will again.—Tom Huddleston  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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2
9/10

Spirited Away (2001)

Moving is a drag for ten-year-old Chihiro, until she discovers she’s meant to work in a bathhouse for the spirit world. Director: Hayao Miyazaki Best quote: “There must be some mistake: None of these pigs are my parents!” Defining moment: Tea and cakes with the monstrous Yubaba and No-Face—a moment in the same surreal league as Lewis Carroll. The apex of Japanese animation—to fans worldwide, all animation—is one of cinema’s finest tales of untrammeled imagination. It’s a movie that emboldens children to embrace weirdness and wonder, and adults to remember how they once did. The plot is a stew of essential anxieties: dislocation, separation from one’s parents, fear of disappearing forever. Even more thoroughly, Spirited Away is a compendium of ancient folklores—the secret lives of radishes and other gods, the sins we commit against nature, her punishments. But as brilliantly woven together by Hayao Miyazaki (at the peak of his creative gifts), the movie is basically a story about growing up. The world is strange; let’s not fool ourselves. But maybe we, as human beings, are stranger. Chihiro is constantly (and riotously) told that she reeks; she fumbles around and incites fury. The lesson here is humility in the face of immortal forces. Critics were wowed, sensing parallels with Japan’s busted economic bubble and polluted streams. Yet the content was—and is—strong enough to stand on its own, a palimpsest of psychology, dreams and fear brought to life by exquisite craft. No film on our list speaks more to the inner animal and anima; is it any wonder those words are so close to animation?—Joshua Rothkopf  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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1
10/10

Pinocchio (1940)

A wooden puppet yearns to be a real boy; he must prove himself worthy. Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske, Bill Roberts, Norman Ferguson, Jack Kinney, Wilfred Jackson and T. Hee Best quote: “Always let your conscience be your guide.” Defining moment: Playing pool, drinking beers, smoking cigars: Who knew it could transform kids into jackasses? (Literally.) And so we reach the top of our list—we’d be lying if we didn’t say it was by a nose. Pinocchio is the most magical of animated movies, a high point of cinematic invention. Its influence on fantasy is massive: Steven Spielberg quotes the soaring ballad “When You Wish Upon a Star” in his dream project Close Encounters of the Third Kind (and remade the whole picture with his aching robot-boy adventure, A.I.). Disney’s second feature—originally a box-office bomb—begins with a sweetly singing cricket, yet plunges into scenes from a nightmare: in front of a jeering audience on a carnival stage; into the belly of a monstrous whale; beyond all human recognition. (Pinocchio’s extending schnoz is animation’s most sinister and profound metaphor.) It’s staggering to think of this material as intended for children, but that’s the power here, a conduit to the churning undercurrent of formulating identity. The takeaway is hard to argue with: Don’t lie, to yourself or others. Cultural theorists have, for decades, discussed Pinocchio in psychosexual terms or as a guide to middle-class assimilation. But those readings are like cracking open a snow globe to see that it’s only water. A swirling adventure flecked with shame, rehabilitation, death and rebirth, the movie contains a universe of feelings. Pinocchio will remain immortal as long as we draw, paint, tell tall tales and wish upon stars.—Joshua Rothkopf  Watch on Amazon Instant Video

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See the full list of the 100 best animated movies

Comments

45 comments
Sacha D
Sacha D

No Ninja Scroll? No thanks!

David B
David B

Pinnochio...who cares what Spielberg thought of it? He hasn't made a decent film since Jaws. Pinnochio is unbearable bollocks which most kids can't sit through...never mind adults. 

Nikk H
Nikk H

I only came on here to read self-righteous people having a whinge.

Nate W
Nate W

Frankly, I didn't even make it as far as the number one spot. The page selection system is so unintuitive that by the time I reached the late pre-teens, I could bare to go no further. Needless to say, that had I reached the end of this dire list I would surely have been disappointed. Several glaring omissions so obvious that I shan't even list them.

Dissapointed.

Rhiannon x

Graham H
Graham H

I can't believe that "Final Fantasy. The Spirits Within" is not up there

?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!??!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!???

Malou C N
Malou C N

WHAT! Where is

"The Pinchcliffe Grand Prix"????? HUGE mistake....

Hunter C
Hunter C

The Brave Little Toaster??? Thief and the Cobbler??  

UptownRoxi
UptownRoxi

List is horse shit, any list that puts pixar films above old school Disney classics or Fantastic Planet or Watership Down is stupid, also no Fritz the Cat 2, Felidae, Heavy Metal or you know the list is completely wrong when an unbelievable film such as The Plague Dogs did not even make top 100

AManCalledDa-da
AManCalledDa-da

Frederic Back's "The Man Who Planted Trees" should be on here, somewhere, though it might not be long enough. Might also move, "Fantastic Mister Fox into the top 6 and drop "ParaNorman" from the list entirely. Sure would be nice to have a Blu-ray "Spirited Away," hint hint Studio Ghibli.

Ahmed Z
Ahmed Z

@AManCalledDa-da If you want to watch spirited away in hd just go on kissanime.com. Search it and set it to 1080p. 

WhyNot Z
WhyNot Z

top 10 should only be studio ghibli films. pixar or disney look like  saturday morning cartoons in comparison

DraconisGhost
DraconisGhost

@WhyNot Z This list isn't just best by how it looks, but by message, impact on other animated movies, and other reasons. 

Fiona B
Fiona B

@DraconisGhost @WhyNot Z

Well then, if thats the criteria then Ghibli should dominate the top 10 list - the messages imbued into Ghibli's animations are far more advanced and sophisticated then that of Disney and Pixar. 
Please research before making a comment, or perhaps just google Princess Mononoke? - or Laputa: Castle in the Sky. Those two films by Ghibli are not only visual feasts but the messages articulated are much more advanced then a simple Disney/Pixar cartoon. 

Kenneth P
Kenneth P

no Lilo and Stitch......sad.

Acadamnica
Acadamnica

Some of the distant edges of greatness will always be overlooked or forgotten.  For myself, it is surprising to find no mention of Will Vinton's The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985).  As far as I know it's the first feature-length claymation film clocking in at 80+ mins.  It's retelling of Adam and Eve is the most heart-warming and bittersweet to be found.  And the Mysterious Stranger remains a serenely frightening segment in the mind.


Best quote: "Life itself is only a vision, a dream.  Nothing exists save empty space and you.  And you are but a thought."

Jennifer G
Jennifer G

would have liked shrek but princess Mononke is not for children some movies were missing tags like Bambie and politics

Lacey L
Lacey L

No love for The Magic Pony (The Magic Horse, The Humpbacked Horse)?? Gorgeously animated Russian folk tale from 1977.

Vinny C
Vinny C

Oh great list, except, what happened to all the dog movies? Seriously? I mean, half of all animated Disney films are about dogs so the complete lack of canines in this list is quite conspicuous.


Where's Bolt? (Super underrated). Where's All Dogs Go To Heaven? Where's 101 Dalmatians and Oliver and Company?


This list is so discriminating. Damn disgrace.

Graham H
Graham H

@Vinny C I think 101 Dalmations came in around 60th. It should have been higher IMO

Ulises A
Ulises A

What about The secret of Kells and Angel´s Egg

Bear T
Bear T

Meh this list is OK.  The many of the rankings are WAY off for me.  And it does feel like they are picking obvious choices from Japanese cinema for example Mind Games, I thought was much better than say Castle In The Sky.  And sleeping beauty was TERRIBLE, just TERRIBLE it had great art direction but other than that it blew hard.

But the glaring omissions in my books are

The Muppet Movie should be in the top 5 for sure.  I'd bump The Incredibles
Sita SIngs Blues (top 20 at least for me)

Secret Of The Kells (Certainly in the top 20 for me as well)
Scanner Darkly Better than most of the top thirty
Rango (one of the best animated film of the past ten years that still holds up after repeated viewing)
Peter and the Wolf

Ghost In The Shell
Heavy Metal
Achii And Ssipak
My Girl Mari
Mind Games
No Bill Plymton (i.e. The Tune)

No Quay Brothers


Even Shrek was better than a lot of these films, the sequels not so much.
And really wasn't LOTR largely animated? If you include Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Jason and the Argonauts...

Olivier S
Olivier S

And Batman Phantom Mask ? Patlabor Movie2 ?

Simon B
Simon B

I was disappointed not see Frankenweenie on the list, that was Tim Burton at his finest

James C
James C

This list is a lot stronger than the majority of 'greatest animation' lists and I'm very glad to see some lesser known films get the recognition they deserve, and very happy also to see Shrek isn't stinking up this list like a lot of the others. This does suffer from the same problem as most of the existing lists though, which is a real lack of diversity and representation. I'd mostly put this down to the voting structure used to compile the list combined with how the history of animation has been recorded. Although a lot of the voters are within the industry and have the credentials it doesn't mean they have a far-reaching knowledge in regards to the history of feature length animation (most animation buffs I know tend to have a far better knowledge of the shorts). Unless you're specifically looking at the animation history of a certain country, most available publications on the history of animation tend to omit large sections of film history (most often those from countries with differing political views to the USA and UK). I am saddened to see countries with rich histories of animation mostly snubbed within this list (Hungary has one film in the list, Russia has none), whilst Bakshi's racist rotoscoped messes, Disneys dullest and mostly live action films with smidgeons of animation have all found a place. 
 
Firstly the list certainly favors more recent films. There are more films within this list from 1990-2014 than there are films from 1926-1989. Over half of the list are films from the USA, and nearly a third where released by Walt Disney. Japanese films take up just over a fifth of the list, half of these by studio Ghibli, and the remainder of the list are mostly French and British films. Three Czech films made the list, but it should be noted they are all by the same director (Jan Svankmajer). I'm not trying to say most of these films don't deserve to be in the list (apart from Ralph Bakshi's, I'm happy to say that), I'm just trying to draw attention to how much is missed from these lists simply because of a film not receiving a western release, or through them being forgotten from the animation history books, and how through a voting format more well-publicized films have the immediate advantage. 

Mario_Thang
Mario_Thang

 I couldn't agree more. What struck me after seeing the list are 1) the list is really English-eccentric, which little recognition to Russian and Hungarian or Czech animation. I remember reading somewhere about the Big Four animation studios in the classic era that are Disney (USA), Soyuzmultfilm (USSR, which released many masterpieces like Tale of Tales (1979), The Old Man and the Sea (1999), Pannonia Film Studio (Hungaria, which released some of classic gems like Cat City (1986); Little Fox (1981)) and Toei Studio (which responsible for early-anime). 


There is no recognition towards Osamu Tezuka (the godfather of anime), many of early anime (like Hakujaden), or the works of Jiri Trnka. 


I think if any foreign countries released the poll like this, Disney would be half as popular as it featured here


Still kudos for the recognition of many American indie animation like Consuming Spirits, Let the Wind Blows or It's Such a Beautiful Day. Any list that ranks It's Such a Beautiful Day high on their list is a winner for me.


2) It still favours many recent films (like you said). I'm actually quite happy that I know most of the titles on the list, but at the same time quite sad that it didn't actually surprise me (which it should, considers many other great animated titles out there)


On the side note, I feel sad that Satoshi Kon's (my favorite director, period) works just appeared in the bottom half of the list. I think his films will grow though.

Marianne H
Marianne H

Movies I am surprised not see here include: The Prince of Egypt, The Road to El Dorado, Anastasia and The Land Before Time. Granted, I think the 60 movies I have seen out of the list all deserve to be here, so maybe there just simply was not room to recognize everything.

michael a
michael a

@tinyorc  exactly! especially prince of egypt and anastasia stood out when you mentioned them

Bat F
Bat F

Did I miss MARY POPPINS on the list? Great songs, academy award winning, in fact. Didn't Julie Andrews win best actress? Pretty rare for a musical, much less one filled with animation. Remember Dick Van Dyke dancing with the animated penguins? Carousel horses flying off the carousel and then interacting with a fox hunt and then a derby race. This movie was a hard one for Disney to make. Watch the movie Saving Mr Banks and you'll see what he went through. I can't believe such a landmark film wasn't there. I'm just hoping I wasn't paying close attention and missed  it.

Nastja J
Nastja J

There are some good suggestions on this list but all in all still a bad list. Americans just shouldn't make those lists, they are way too close minded and blind for a true beauty.

Brandon H
Brandon H

@Nastja J  Not all americans think that way... I personally love Japanese animation and without a doubt would pick it over most of the American animation any day! Some of them do belong on the top 100 and that being said i just looked at the top 10 just to get an idea.. Just dont bunch all Americans up together! :)

James C
James C

@Nastja J  I wouldn't go as far as to say Americans are closed minded or blind to beauty but i see your frustration. I think it's largely to do with a patriotic focus within american books on animation and how animation is reported on. The only foreign films that tend to get attention given to them in these lists are those that made it to America for the fesitvals and managed a release. Ideas that animation is for kids rather than an artform seems to be reinforced in America more than other countries also. Far more adult oriented animation has come from Europe and Asia. Not everyone who voted on the list was American, but it's fairly obvious by the selection how bias would exist. A whole section of voters from disney and pixar... jeeeez.

Mari5HK
Mari5HK

 @Nastja J Ar, 100% agree. Animation can be both leisure for kids and artforms for adults.

Kyle F
Kyle F

It's insulting that Shrek isn't on this list. Whether you liked the sequels or not (although even Shrek 2 should have been towards the top), there's no denying that it's one of the most original and influential animated films of the past several years. 

And its still yet to be matched in terms of very real, very fleshed out characters.

James C
James C

I'm insulted you're insulted. Shrek is pretty poor. Give it 30 years, you'll see how relevant and well-loved it still is then. Pop culture gags don't tend to hold up that long (especially bad ones based on the matrix).

John W
John W

No howls moving castle? Sad..

Woodsy
Woodsy

...and where is The Wind Rises?  Wolf Children easily deserves a spot as well.

John H
John H

@Woodsy The Wind Rises is good, but a) it's too new for most to have seen, and b) it's not Miyazaki's best anyway (though it probably does deserve to be on the list, not near the top). Wolf Children probably does deserve to be on the list as well. Grave of the Fireflies is the best animated film ever made and they put it at 15th, so it's a bit biased to what Americans probably haven't seen (i.e. they might have seen a Miyazaki film, but not less well known Japanese animated films).

justin h
justin h

Sorry, but you have Wreck-It Ralph listed above the Lion King...

And neither Dumbo nor The Incredibles should be listed in the top 10.

A great 100 films nonetheless.

Marc R
Marc R

I am sure we all will have a favorite not on this list.  I, for one, love HEAVY METAL, but what I don't understand is why there are live action films like KING KONG, JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS, AND WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT on a list intended to celebrate the artful beauty of animation.  Live action films do not cross over into the realm of animation because they incorporate animation or stop motion into their visual effects.  If we did that practically every modern film that utilizes excessive amounts of CGI would be considered animated.

Patrick K
Patrick K

 All those films were ground breaking for their time in terms of technical side of animation. WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT was a training ground for many of the animators that went on to make other films on this list such as ALADDIN, LION KING etc.

As for JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS & KING KONG, although not personal favourites of mine many stop motion animators were inspired to go into the profession from watching those films so they rightfully have a place on the list imo.

James C
James C

I'd have to agree with you here. I am fine with live action in my animated films, but I consider it a different thing to animation in a live action film. For example I have no issues with James and the giant peach being in the list, but I do with king kong. 5 minutes of animation does not consitute an animated feature. I'd say at least 75% of the feature would need to be animated.

Eric M
Eric M

I have a hard time understanding how Wizards, arguably Bakshi's finest work, didnt make the list..

Francis Y
Francis Y

A nice list, although I think it would've been better if it was unranked. Ranking such a wide range of films leaves it open to heavy recency and exposure bias. A good example is Spirited away at 2. No doubt this is thanks its theatrical release and exposure in the West, but within the realm of Ghibli productions, Spirited Away doesn't even figure into the top 5.

The one egregious omission from this list, however, is Mamoru Hosoa (The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, Summer Wars, Wolf Children Ame and Yuki). Genuinely surprised not a single one of his movies made it here.