Restaurants in Greenwich Village: Where to eat in the Village

Discover the best restaurants and cafés in Greenwich Village in New York City, including critics' picks and affordable options.

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Greenwich Village boasts a wide range of fine restaurants, from hot spot Minetta Tavern (home to one of the best burgers in NYC) to Thai restaurants Kin Shop and Lotus of Siam. In a nod to NYU's presence, there's also a profusion of cheap eats, like pizza joint Artichoke Basille's.

RECOMMENDED: Greenwich Village guide

  1. Critics picks
  2. Cheap restaurants

Critics picks in Greenwich Village

Ushiwakamaru

  • Price band: 4/4
  • Critics choice

It’s no surprise that Japan-philes flock to this austere restaurant: Those new to the cuisine might not know what to make of the tiny cube of green-tea tofu that’s served as an amuse-bouche, or the shrimp heads floating in the miso soup. Entrées feature classic maki (no Elvis roll here), sushi and sashimi, and little else. Put yourself in the hands of chef-owner Hideo Kuribara and you’ll be richly rewarded. A special might include sushi pieces topped with burstingly fresh salmon roe, the choicest slice of fatty tuna or a generous mound of shredded, fresh crab. Kuribara’s attention to quality and detail is ferocious: The wasabi is real (a rare luxury), and the intensely flavored, almost bitter, green-tea ice cream is house-made.

  1. 136 W Houston St, between MacDougal and Sullivan Sts, 10012-25
  2. Average main course: $15. AmEx, DC, Disc, MC, V
More info

Minetta Tavern

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice

For three decades Keith McNally’s New York restaurants have defined effortless cool, generating the sort of overnight buzz—and long-running exclusivity—institutions are made of. His hot spots have become pop culture touchstones—Odeon, Nell’s, Caf Luxembourg in the ’80s; Pravda, Balthazar, Pastis in the ’90s—delivering intangible pleasures that go far beyond food. McNally’s Minetta Tavern, a West Village relic reborn, may be the first iconic restaurant of postmillennial recession New York. The lovingly restored dining room is as nostalgic as the '21’ Club’s—and getting in the door as difficult as penetrating Graydon Carter’s Waverly Inn. But unlike the Vanity Fair editor’s celebrity canteen, Minetta’s prices are reasonable, and the food is as much of a draw as the scene. In recent years, Minetta Tavern—which began as a speakeasy in the 1920s and later attracted all types of luminaries—had become a museum piece, notable only for its time-capsule interior. McNally hasn’t tampered much with the setting. Black-and-white snapshots and caricatures of bygone notables still hang above brand-new, artfully scuffed red leather banquettes. The back-room murals have been buffed to their original splendor, and the place—with an unlisted number for insiders—is as buzzy now as it must have been in its heyday. McNally, who has a sociologist’s gift for reading and responding to the cultural moment, has unveiled a power restaurant for the newly modest New York, a place where jeans and T-shirts a

  1. 113 MacDougal St, at Minetta Ln, 10012
  2. Average main course: $24
Make reservation

Blue Hill

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

More than a mere crusader for sustainability, Dan Barber is also one of the most talented cooks in town. He builds his oft-changing menu around whatever’s at its peak on his Westchester farm (home to a sibling restaurant). During fresh pea season bright green infuses every inch of the menu, from a velvety spring pea soup to sous-vide duck breast as soft as sushi fanned over a slivered bed of sugar snap peas. Start to finish, there’s a garden on every plate—from buttery ravioli filled with tangy greens to just-picked cherries under a sweet cobbler crust. Once among the most sedate little restaurants in the Village, this cramped subterranean jewel box has become one of the most raucous.

  1. 75 Washington Pl, between Sixth Ave and Washington Sq West, 10011
  2. Average main course: $28. AmEx, DC, MC, V
Make reservation

Gotham Bar and Grill

  • Critics choice

Chef-owner Alfred Portale made his name with towering New American constructions, and though the menu doesn’t push any boundaries, the execution is impressive—as is the restaurant’s soaring, masculine space. A beet and mango salad with fennel, red onions and feta sounds like any other upscale beet salad. But the beautifully simple dish—deep red and vibrant orange cubes with ribbons of shaved vegetables on a narrow, rectangular plate—has a presentation as sharp as its crystalline flavors. Juicy fried soft-shell crabs with morels, fresh peas, ramps and couscous is a thoroughly satisfying, borderline architectural tangle of bodies and legs. It’s pricey, but Gotham delivers.

  1. 12 E 12th St, between Fifth Ave and University Pl, 10003
  2. Average main course: $36. AmEx, DC, Disc, MC, V
Make reservation

Greenwich Village Country Club

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

New York is filled with places to act like a grown-up kid: For every pedantic cocktail joint serving historically inspired punches, there's a place to get hammered while whacking a Ping-Pong ball or shooting animated caribou. Yet for all of its regressive pleasures, Gotham has yet to mine the potential joys of drunken miniature golf—until now. The team behind Bowlmor Lanes has taken on the challenge, outfitting the 16,000-square-foot space above the alleys with the city's first indoor putt-putt course. The new urban country-club concept replaces the Coney Island–themed club, Carnival, though the place still maintains a fun-house vibe, thanks to an odd mishmash of themes: Vintage fiberglass animals taken from a '60s amusement park lurk among the mini-golf holes, an artificial-grass bocce court is lined with black-and-white photos of high-society high jinks, and an awning near the entrance offers an unexplained homage to CBGB. It's plenty weird, and potentially a blast if you're in the right frame of mind. DRINK THIS: Drinking here is something you do between the greens, not an end in itself. Cocktails with names like the Dessert-ini (alcohol-infused chocolate milk, vanilla vodka) should give you pause; instead, play it safe with basic wine-by-the-glass and draft beer options, or grab cans of suds served in paper bags for ultimate mobility while you peruse the amusements. The grub, like the drinks, is more party fuel than anything else. You'll find the same high-concept junk fo

  1. 110 University Pl, between 12th and 13th Sts, 10003
  2. Average main course: $18. AmEx, MC, V
More info

Acme

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Scandinavia is at the top of every wayfaring gastronome's must-visit list lately. With young Nordic chefs racking up international accolades and glossy magazine spreads, the region's food scene—known for the extreme locavore cooking showcased at restaurants like Copenhagen's Noma—is suddenly the hottest on earth. But while New Nordic cuisine may be trending around the globe, it's taken its sweet time in trickling down to New York. Attentive diners may have spotted hints of the region's influence in Gotham already—some foraged ingredients here, some studied plating there. But at the Acme reboot on Great Jones Street, it's finally arrived in earnest, thanks to Danish chef Mads Refslund, who cofounded Noma with superstar Ren Redzepi (but left after a year to do his own thing). The former Cajun dive may be the last place in the city you'd expect to find cutting-edge cooking. But defying convention and expectations is what put the Scandinavian trailblazers on the map to begin with. The new cool-kid owners—restaurateur Jean-Marc Houmard of Indochine and former Boom Boom Room bar manager Jon Neidich—have transformed this once-grungy spot into a raffish and chic downtown bistro, featuring a retro mix of Pop Art and antiques. A room this seductive could draw a stylish crowd even with a menu of burgers and fries, but Refslund can do better than that. His menu delivers an easy introduction to the avant-garde cuisine of Northern Europe, unpretentious and moderately priced. His food is un

  1. 9 Great Jones St, between Broadway and Lafayette St, 10012
  2. Average main course: $25. AmEx, MC, V
Make reservation

Lupa

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

This much-hyped trattorria sure packs ‘em in. The frenetic pace—of the staff, the bar, the adjacent table just off your elbow—are further aggravated by a solid layer of techno. Knowledgeable staff brings fantastic wines from a manageable list, but overall the food proves uneven. An orecchiette with greens and sausage packs a rich, spicy punch, but the ricotta gnocchi can be overcooked. A silky smooth panna cotta is worth the visit, while both the saltimbocca and pork shoulder can be heavy handed. Is Lupa resting on it’s laurels a bit early?

  1. 170 Thompson St, between Bleecker and Houston Sts, 10012
  2. Average main course: $18. AmEx, Disc, MC, V
Make reservation

The Lion

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 4/4
  • Critics choice

Still can’t make it past the host stand at Graydon Carter’s Waverly Inn? No luck scoring a decent table at Minetta Tavern between 5:30 and 11pm? Take heart, scenester. The Lion is much less likely to turn you away. The latest addition to the new power pantheon may be Gotham’s most democratic high-profile restaurant. While the Waverly features just a tiny lounge to accommodate gawkers and won’t take reservations by phone, the bar at the Lion is surrounded by tables for walk-ins, and the phone lines are wide open. Though you may still have a tough time landing a prime table for dinner—we managed to snag seats pretty easily on a Sunday evening—the reception is uncharacteristically warm for a place seeking Page Six immortality. Our waiter was so genial, he could have been stolen from a Danny Meyer establishment. A bartender on another evening was just as fraternal, pouring a generous drink while gushing over the burger I’d ordered. This despite a crush of publishing minions fighting their way to the bar—necks craning to catch a glimpse of every arrival—while co-owner and Men’s Health editor Dave Zinczenko held court among them. While the magazine honcho is a partner in the Lion with NBC’s Dan Abrams, this is first and foremost a John DeLucie establishment. The chef—still the co-owner of the Waverly—is an imposing presence, greeting friends in the dining room one minute, expediting dishes the next. His new restaurant, inspired by the West Village landmark that thrived at this brow

  1. 62 W 9th St, between Fifth and Sixth Aves
  2. Average main course: $25. AmEx, MC, V
Make reservation

Otto Enoteca Pizzeria

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

At Mario Batali’s inspired pizza place, expectant diners are assigned a city, then must wait for it to be posted on a board imported from an Italian train station. It’s a cute idea, but the constant crush of Batali fans means that you can be watching the board for 40 minutes or more. The Otto team can get away with this because the food lives up to its reputation. Italian cheeses come with such counterpoints as jellied Seville orange rinds or honey with black-truffle drippings. The 700-bottle wine list favors offbeat selections that can be sampled in quartino minicarafes. The award-winning gelato selection ranges from excellent to exceptional (the salty-sweet olive-oil flavor). The centerpiece here is the selection of individual-size pizzas. Toppings such as shell-on clams or lardo, thin slices of luscious pork fat, are terrific and come on a pitch-perfect crust.

  1. 1 Fifth Ave, at 8th St, 10003-43
  2. Average individual pizza: $14. AmEx, MC, V
Make reservation

Lotus of Siam

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

New Yorkers love Thai food, but the neutered pad si-ewe we scarf from a carton has nothing in common with the vibrant plates at this pedigreed Vegas import. The menu homes in on the cuisine of northern Thailand, delivering knockouts like an artfully balanced minced-pork larb salad, packed with lemongrass, scallions, green chilies and lime. Other dishes were equally nuanced. A funky crispy-rice and Thai-sausage starter had a fiery kick with bright peanuts and ginger creeping in underneath, while a silky green curry was elevated by kafir lime and cilantro. Caveat emptor: While the menu remains intact, the departure of the Chutima family (which runs the Vegas original) makes us wonder if the restaurant's best days might be behind it.

  1. 24 Fifth Ave, between 9th and 10th Sts
  2. Average main course: $16. AmEx, MC, V
More info

Artichoke Basille's

  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

This ultra-popular slice joint has some serious competition in the West Village—a hood saturated with pizza both excellent (Keste) and iconic (John's). The simple shop, with stool seating and no tables, offers the same brief menu as the East Village original: Come late-night to gorge on Margherita, Sicilian and the creamy artichoke-and-spinach pies, along with cups of Budweiser to wash it down.

  1. 111 MacDougal St, between Bleecker St and Minetta Ln, 10012
  2. Average pizza slice: $4. AmEx, Disc, MC, V
More info

Kin Shop

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Top Chef champ Harold Dieterle channels his Southeast Asian travels into the menu at his sophomore eatery, which serves classic Thai street food alongside more upmarket Thai-inspired dishes. The traditional fare—including taste-bud-obliterating duck larb salad—seems extraneous, but Dieterle’s auteur creations are often inspired. A salad of fried oysters, slivered celery and crispy pork belly is bright and refreshing, while a chefly riff on Massaman curry features a long-braised goat neck with a silky sauce infused with coconut milk, duck fat and pineapple juice. Pair the spicy grub with thoughtful drinks (like the herbaceous Kin & Tonic) that can help tame the flame.

  1. 469 Sixth Ave, between 11th and 12th Sts
  2. Average main course: $20. AmEx, MC, V
More info

Mamoun’s Falafel

  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

It’s 4am, and you have three dollars and the munchies. Take heart: Mamoun’s Falafel is there for you, day or night. Serving quality Middle Eastern food since 1971, the place charges an extra 50 cents for to-go orders (which seems like a premium on top of a $2 order), so it’s an even better deal to show up late at night, when you might get a seat. The tabouli sandwich is tasty, but it will give you dry-mouth (if you don’t already have it), so pair it with lentil soup or order it as a platter (which includes veggies, dressing and pita). The falafel is served in a pita with lettuce, tomato and tahini, and you’d be well advised to add hummus or baba ganoush. Sweet pastries such as baklava and knafe—shredded phyllo dough with pistachios—leave you satisfied and ready for bed.

  1. 119 MacDougal St, between Bleecker and W 3rd Sts, 10012
  2. Average falafel: $2. Cash only.
More info
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  1. Critics picks
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