Gilles Verot’s sausage primer

A cheat sheet of our favorite links at DBGB

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  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Beaujolais

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Tunisienne

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Vermont

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Boudin blanc de volaille

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    DBGB Dog

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Thai

Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

Beaujolais

Beaujolais
“This is our most popular sausage,” says Verot, and it’s easy to see why. The hunks of red-wine–marinated pork belly that make up the grind are at once sweet and smoky, and they’re interspersed with chewy bits of bacon, roasted mushrooms and onion. With slow-cooked French green lentils gathering up the meaty juices, the dish brings to mind a rib-sticking cassoulet. $14

Tunisienne
The crew doesn’t stray far from tradition for their spicy merguez, a coarsely ground blend of lamb leg marinated for up to two days with mint, harissa, paprika and a flurry of other spices. The curled banger is served ceremoniously in a North African–style tagine, resting on a bed of chickpeas and deeply flavorful spinach braised with more harissa. $15

Vermont
Perhaps the richest of the bunch, this homage to the Green Mountain State is made from smoked pork belly and stuffed with tangy yellow cheddar that seeps into the meat with each bite. A wedge of gratinlike hash browns with red onion and zesty crème fraîche rounds out the dish. $15

Boudin blanc de volaille
Charcuterie tends to be a porkcentric discipline, but Verot and Dufour work diligently to incorporate other proteins into DBGB’s bill of fare. For their most recent creation, they’ve remixed the classic boudin blanc, swapping in chicken for swine to create this lighter seasonal riff. The poultry is turned into a mousse then poached to produce a fluffy, creamy texture. A dose of curry spices brings to mind a German currywurst, and the accoutrements—cauliflower kicked up with green-curry dressing, plus white raisins and toasted almonds—work to amp up the subtle Indian flavors. $13

DBGB Dog
Verot’s rendition of the American classic—made with 100 percent beef and house-smoked—is a worthy addition to the NYC hot-dog pantheon, with a creamy interior and plenty of meaty flavor. The boulangers contribute a squishy white-bread bun, while chef Olivier Quignon piles on toppings such as julienned radish, house relish and a tangy blend of ketchup and Dijon $9, bar $10 (includes one beer)

Thai
Lemongrass and red-curry spices bring distinct Southeast Asian flair to this pork sausage, served alongside a fragrant mound of basil-fried rice. The same wiener shows up with country pâté, house-cured ham and jalapeño mayo in the excellent banh mi hot dog at Épicerie Boulud. $14

Related: Behind the scenes with Gilles Verot

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