New York Film Festival

Complete coverage of this year's New York Film Festival and reviews of the biggest premieres, from Hollywood's sharpest Oscar fare to the foreign fringe

The prestige cinema event of NYC's fall season, the New York Film Festival stretches back to 1963, when it established a mission of bringing the best work from around the world to Lincoln Center. Highly curated, this year's Main Slate includes 31 titles.

Tickets for NYFF are now on sale and can be purchased directly at the Alice Tully Hall box office from 10am to 6pm, daily. You can also purchase them online at www.filmlinc.com/NYFF or by phone using CenterCharge at 212.721.6500 (10am–9pm, daily).

The options are varied, but essentially, single tickets for the Alice Tully Hall screenings are $20 for Film Society of Lincoln Center members, $25 for nonmembers. (Save on service charges by buying tickets in person at the box office.) Screenings at other venues are $5 cheaper. The opening night, centerpiece and closing-night selections are $25–$50 pricier.

When is the New York Film Festival?

This year, the fest runs September 26–October 12, 2014.

Where is the New York Film Festival?

 The festival's main venue is Lincoln Center's swanky Alice Tully Hall (1941 Broadway (between 65th and 66th Sts). All Main Slate titles have an initial screening there, with subsequent screenings at various Lincoln Center venues, including the Walter Reade Theater (165 W. 65th St) and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (144 W. 65th St).

The 10 best NYFF films

Want to know what to see at NYFF? Check out our top picks

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Movies

Review: Gone Girl

A once-in-a-decade wickedly confident Hollywood thriller

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Interview: David Fincher

We talk with the onetime cinematic bad boy about sharpening his claws again

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Movies

Review: Birdman

A savagely funny, strangely sweet, sad and utterly brilliant New York-set comedy

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Review: Two Days, One Night

Perhaps one of the Dardennes brothers' best films

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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New York Film Festival's biggest Films

Movies

Inherent Vice

Ever since Boogie Nights, the untamable Paul Thomas Anderson has thrilled us with the mania of self-made men—porn stars, game-show hosts, oil prospectors and cultists. Now, for a change, the director grabs you by the nose: Inherent Vice, Anderson's sexy, swirling latest (based on Thomas Pynchon's exquisite stoner mystery set at the dawn of the '70s), is a wondrously fragrant movie, emanating sweat, the stink of pot clouds and the press of hairy bodies. It's a film you sink into, like a haze on the road, even as it jerks you along with spikes of humor. "Go back to the beach, you smell like a patchouli fart." growls Josh Brolin's flat-topped L.A. detective, Bigfoot Bjornsen, to our dazed hero, Doc (Joaquin Phoenix), an unlikely private eye, but one you can't help rooting for. We're in a semifictionalized version of California, sort of like the real thing but scented with hallucinogenic behavior, weird restaurant menus and Manson-era paranoia. (Maybe that's not so altered at all.) Inherent Vice is the first time that Pynchon's elaborately dense prose has made it to the screen, and for good reason. Finally, with this novel, a recognizable thrust could be seen: an us-versus-them hippy fantasia decked out in the trappings of noir. Anderson doesn't so much adapt the novel as hawk it up on the screen proudly, in faithful chunks. (His screenplay is said to have received the author's blessing.) And the movie he's ended up with is astounding: literary, loose-limbed and simply impossible

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Gone Girl

Director David Fincher adapts bestselling novelist Gillian Flynn with a cast including Rosamund Pike (finally getting a proper starring role), Ben Affleck and the ever-wonderful Neil Patrick Harris. In Flynn’s rip-roaring novel, a husband (Affleck) goes in search of his missing wife (Pike) and turns up a lot more than he bargained for. But while we did enjoy the book, we’ll admit to being ever so slightly disappointed that Fincher has chosen to follow ‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ with yet another pulpy crime thriller, particularly when his last three original projects – ‘Zodiac’, ‘Benjamin Button’ and ‘The Social Network’ – showed a fine director becoming a truly great one. That said, this is bound to be a pulse-racing watch.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Mr. Turner

Twice before, first with Topsy-Turvy and then with Vera Drake, Mike Leigh has punctuated his bittersweet studies of contemporary life with period dramas. Now, with Mr. Turner, the British director of Naked and Secrets & Lies takes us back to the nineteenth century and the later years of the celebrated, groundbreaking, difficult painter J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851). Sad and joyful, Mr. Turner offers a wonderfully rich tapestry of experience, digging deeply into a complicated, contradictory life.Timothy Spall—a veteran of Leigh's films—plays this eccentric, determined London bohemian like a bronchial, cantankerous, randy old toad with back ache. He grunts and grimaces and gropes his way through life. He talks like a market trader after a crash course in literary classics. Leigh, meanwhile, explores Turner's life unburdened by any sense of purpose other than an intense, contagious fascination with this man, his work and, increasingly, the inevitable, slow, irresistible trudge towards death.We observe Turner's fondness for his elderly father; his sexual relationship with his meek housekeeper (Dorothy Atkinson); his rejection of his children and their mother; his arms-length acceptance by the lions of the Royal Academy; his late-life relationship with a Margate widow (Marion Bailey); and the mockery of the crowd when his work turns experimental. "Vile" and a "yellow mess" concludes Queen Victoria at an exhibition: The presence of royalty in a Mike Leigh film is just one of its many w

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Goodbye to Language

A boat sails into port. Frankenstein author Mary Shelley scratches in her composition book with a quill. The second movement of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony begins, halts abruptly, then begins again. A naked woman pontificates while her male lover takes a loud shit that would shame Austin Powers’ Fat Bastard. A dog runs into a forest, then back out. The boat leaves port. Those are some of the images and sounds you’ll experience in Jean-Luc Godard’s playful, provocative latest. After his stimulating, highly uneven Film Socialisme (2010), it’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit: As with much Godard after 1967’s epochal Weekend, this is a free-associative essay film that eschews straight narrative, includes a tidal wave of allusions (both visual and verbal), and unfolds over several planes of action. Impossible as it is, you have to look everywhere at once. Godard has called the film a simple one about a married woman, a single man and a dog. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re always portrayed by the same people—or even exist in the same time period. Only that scene-stealing canine (played by Godard’s pet pooch, Roxy) seems to be its own entity, a silent witness to the man and woman’s tempestuous relationship. One shot of our furry friend sleeping on a couch while an offscreen argument rages calls to mind an observation by Abbas Kiarostami (a Godard

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Two Days, One Night

Belgium's Dardenne brothers, Jean-Pierre and Luc, make punchy, contemporary, socially aware films—simple on the surface but alive with compassion and wisdom. As filmmakers, the Dardennes are never less than reliable, yet still, Two Days, One Night feels like one of their best, up there with The Child or Rosetta in its cast-iron sense of purpose, searing relevance and understanding of how tough it is for all of us, especially the less well-off, to do the right thing in our everyday lives. It features a career-high performance from Oscar-winner Marion Cotillard—by far the Dardennes' starriest casting to date—and has a starting-gun premise: A young mother, Sandra (Cotillard), recently taking time off work for depression, is made redundant by a small factory that manufactures solar panels. In her absence, 14 of her 16 colleagues have voted to take their bonuses rather than let her keep her job. But willed into action by a supportive husband, Manu (Fabrizio Rongione), Sandra persuades her boss to give her one last chance and to host a second vote round of voting two days later. Will she be able to save her job by knocking on doors over the weekend to persuade her colleagues to support her? What follows could so easily feel repetitive or like a perfunctory tour of Belgium's working class as, one by one, we meet these 16 colleagues and their families, hovering on their doorsteps or in their homes. But in the hands of the Dardennes, the repetition—the question, "Will you vote for me?

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Birdman

"Most of the successful people in Hollywood are failures as human beings." So said Marlon Brando. But what happens when their 15 minutes are up? It’s not like failure suddenly transforms former megacelebs into humble human beings who can pick up their own coffee from Starbucks. That's Michael Keaton’s problem in this savagely funny, strangely sweet, sad and utterly brilliant New York-set comedy from Mexican writer-director Alejandro González Iñárritu, better known for his gloomy, state-of-the world dramas Babel and 21 Grams.Keaton is Riggan Thomson, an actor who raked in the cash in the early 1990s as a lame pre-Avengers superhero in a blockbuster franchise (a clear nod to Keaton's own days as Batman). He hasn’t made a Birdman film in years—but Birdman is still part of him. Quite literally: There's a booming comic voice in his head ("You're the real deal"), and it gives him superhuman powers. Is Birdman a figment of Riggan's imagination? Is this a dig at superstar actors with inflated egos who have trouble telling the difference between real life and their movie characters? Whatever it is, Riggan has problems. He’s trying to reinvent himself for a second act as a Serious Artist, remortgaging the house in Malibu to write, direct and star in an adaptation of a Raymond Carver short story on Broadway. But Birdman is shitting on the plan, telling Riggan to make a reality-TV show instead of this "piece of shit."Birdman is hilarious simply as a film about putting on a play, shot by

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Maps to the Stars

Targets don’t come much softer than Hollywood. What stops David Cronenberg’s grotesque noir, written by L.A. insider Bruce Wagner, from feeling tired is that it’s deliciously odd. It hovers in the ether above reality, as if the director of The Fly, A History of Violence and Cosmopolis managed to get his hands on a rogue script for TV’s Entourage and up the weird factor tenfold. Some of this creepy portrait of Beverly Hills screw-ups is deeply silly—here’s looking at you, John Cusack as a self-help guru—but it has just enough venomous bite to leave you feeling poisoned simply from being in the company of these gargoyles for two hours. At first, it feels like Maps to the Stars is going to play close to known reality, with characters talking about "Harvey" (Weinstein, we presume) and about how one filmmaker "ain’t P.T. Anderson." "This is Garry Marshall not Bertolucci," says Julianne Moore’s desperate, fat-lipped actress Havana. She’s a horrific creation: spoiled, needy, two-faced, the daughter of another actress ("a dead cult figure") and a lonely, walking mess in Rodeo Drive clothes, aching to land a role. Another character, Agatha (Mia Wasikowska), steps off the bus from a shady past and becomes her assistant. Her arms are always covered; on her face are scars. She’s obsessed with celebrity and makes friends with a limo driver-cum-wannabe screenwriter (Robert Pattinson, in a side role), but her eye is always on a bigger prize. Elsewhere we meet a child movie star, Benjie (Eva

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Clouds of Sils Maria

When we first meet Maria Enders (Juliette Binoche), she’s riding on a train through the Alps with her ever-present assistant, Valentine (Stewart), by her side. Olivier Assayas’s initially intriguing, ultimately wispy drama doles out the facts in quick succession: Maria is a high-profile stage and film actor in the process of a bitter divorce, and she’s on her way to present an award to the writer who, twenty years earlier, authored the play that first brought her to the world’s attention. (It was a workplace dramedy about a young secretary coldly seducing her female boss to get ahead.) But then Valentine gets a call: The poor honoree has died of a heart attack, the first of several crises that throw Maria off her axis. Assayas’s film is similarly unmoored, though it takes a while to realize that. He keeps a placid distance from his characters, settling into an easygoing, lightly satirical groove after Maria accepts an offer to do a new production of her deceased mentor’s play. The catch: This time, she’ll be the older woman and troubled Hollywood starlet JoAnn Ellis (Chloë Grace Moretz)—whom we primarily see in TMZ-like paparazzi videos and a hilarious movie-within-the-movie superhero parody—will play the conniving assistant. If you’ve seen Ingmar Bergman’s Persona, you’ll have an inkling of where this is headed. Part of the fun, though, is watching Assayas put his own playful spin on the actorcentric metamovie: It’s actually assistant Valentine who becomes Maria’s quasirival

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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The latest New York Film Festival reviews

Movies

New York Film Festival reviews

Keep up to date with the hits and misses from this year’s New York Film Festival

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New York Film Festival 2013

Movies

About Time

Awkward young Brit Tim (Domhnall Gleeson) wants nothing more than to meet the love of his life. American expat Mary (Rachel McAdams) fits that bill perfectly. So far, so rom-com formulaic, but there’s a wrinkle: Like all the men in his family, Tim can travel through time, allowing him to correct any slipups. Writer-director Richard Curtis (Love Actually) has fun setting up the high-concept premise; in an early scene, patriarch Bill Nighy hilariously explains the ins and outs of their special ability, which relies on clenched fists as opposed to flux capacitors. It’s not too long, though, before the film turns into a treacly male weepie, with several facepalm-worthy music cues (Gus Van Sant’s Gerry excepted, it’s time to retire Arvo Pärt’s “Spiegel im Spiegel” now, filmmakers) and some truly icky gender politics (all the female characters are oblivious playthings for their male counterparts to manipulate with extratemporal abilities). This is one of those dreadful NYFF titles that makes you wonder why it was included. Click for showtimes.—Keith UhlichRECOMMENDED: All New York Film Festival coverage Most popular in Film The 50 greatest war films of all time Fall in for TONY's list of mighty military movies. See more film lists 50 American films, 50 states In celebration of the big, bold USA, we take a trip through all 50 states via 50 indelible American films. See more film lists Movie moms: The 50 most classic movie mothers of all time Movies about youth & rebellion: Th

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Abuse of Weakness

French provocateur Catherine Breillat (Fat Girl) delves into her own discomfiting history with her latest feature. Maud Schoenberg (Isabelle Huppert, in one of her finest performances) is a filmmaker who suffers a stroke and, during recovery, falls under the spell of a con artist—played by enticingly rugged hip-hop performer Kool Shen—who she wants to cast in her new project. If these elements sound vaguely familiar, it’s because Breillat herself had a stroke in 2004 and soon after was bilked out of a small fortune by the notorious swindler Christophe Rocancourt. Abuse of Weakness feels like a personal exorcism—unsentimental in its presentation of illness and especially tough (neither apologetic nor pitiable) in the way it views the often-irrational behavior of Breillat’s onscreen surrogate. It’s another fascinating entry in the director’s ongoing exploration of the sadistic and masochistic facets of human behavior. Click for showtimes.—Keith UhlichRECOMMENDED: All New York Film Festival coverage Most popular in Film The 50 best documentaries of all time Get back to reality with our ranked list of nonfiction triumphs. See more film lists 50 American films, 50 states In celebration of the big, bold USA, we take a trip through all 50 states via 50 indelible American films. See more film lists Movie moms: The 50 most classic movie mothers of all time Movies about youth & rebellion: The 50 best youth-gone-wild films The best and worst James Bond movies: a ranked list The t

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Movies

Alan Partridge

TV characters rarely make a satisfying leap to feature-length affairs, though fans of Steve Coogan’s Alan Partridge—a former BBC talk-show host reduced to killing time as a small-town radio DJ—have long prayed this brilliant cringe-comic creation would be the exception to the rule. The big-screen debut for North Norwich’s No. 1 son, however, is a textbook case of why these things are bad ideas: By dropping his iconic Britcom character into a Die Hard–lite scenario involving a hostage situation, Coogan & Co. come dangerously close to squandering two decades’ worth of good will. There are still intermittent moments of genius involving Partridge’s bottomless narcissism, as well as a handful of great lines (Partridge’s deejaying banter: “That was soft-rock cocaine enthusiasts Fleetwood Mac!”), but you’re better off just watching the various Beeb series for the first time, or the gajillionth. Click for showtimes.—David FearRECOMMENDED: All New York Film Festival coverage Most popular in Film The 50 greatest war films of all time Fall in for TONY's list of mighty military movies. See more film lists 50 American films, 50 states In celebration of the big, bold USA, we take a trip through all 50 states via 50 indelible American films. See more film lists Movie moms: The 50 most classic movie mothers of all time Movies about youth & rebellion: The 50 best youth-gone-wild films The best and worst James Bond movies: a ranked list The top 50 sports films of all time The 100 best f

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Movies

All Is Lost

There are survivalist tales, and then there’s J.C. Chandor’s rigorous, rugged story of a nameless seafaring man (Robert Redford) trying desperately to save himself as his boat slowly sinks. A floating shipping container knocks a hole in the cabin of our hero’s modest yacht; drastic countermeasures are taken, things fall apart, and a waterlogged existentialism sets in as this rugged seaman watches his chances dwindle to zero. (Imagine the middle section of Life of Pi as rewritten by Master and Commander’s Patrick O’Brian, and you’re halfway there.) Dedicated to authentically depicting nautical know-how (and nearly dialogueless), the director’s follow-up to Margin Call presents one of the most stunning man-versus-nature battles in recent memory—aided by Redford, who gives a career-best performance while barely saying a word. Click for showtimes.—David FearRECOMMENDED: All New York Film Festival coverage Most popular in Film The 50 greatest war films of all time Fall in for TONY's list of mighty military movies. See more film lists 50 American films, 50 states In celebration of the big, bold USA, we take a trip through all 50 states via 50 indelible American films. See more film lists Movie moms: The 50 most classic movie mothers of all time Movies about youth & rebellion: The 50 best youth-gone-wild films The best and worst James Bond movies: a ranked list The top 50 sports films of all time The 100 best films set in New York City Our 50 favorite film fools The 50 best u

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New York Film Festival 2012

Araf—Somewhere in Between

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Barbara

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The Bay

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