Ten must-see works at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Good for: Modern-art buffs.

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  • Photograph: Sheldan C. Collins

    Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games

    Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games

  • Photograph: The Estate of Eva Hesse

    Eva Hesse, No Title

    Eva Hesse, No Title

  • Photograph: Sheldan C. Collins

    Robert Grosvenor, Tenerlife

    Robert Grosvenor, Tenerlife

  • Photograph: Photograph: Jerry L. Thompson The George and Helen Segal Foundation/Licensed by VAGA; New York

    George Segal, Walk, Don't Walk

    George Segal, Walk, Don't Walk

  • Photograph: Courtesy the artist and Picture Palace Pictures

    Kevin Jerome Everson, still from Ninety-Three

    Kevin Jerome Everson, still from Ninety-Three

Photograph: Sheldan C. Collins

Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games

Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games

Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games
As you walk into the Brooklyn multimedia artist's first major New York show, you'll be bombarded by seven bowling video games, dating between the late '70s and the early 2000s. The backgrounds are projected onto the wall in a row, like the lanes in an alley. Two cool things to note: The artist hacked each game and programmed it to bowl only gutter balls; and you get to see some awesomely retro consoles, including '80s and '90s Nintendos and an Atari 2600 from 1977.
Where to find it: "Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools," through Sept 11

Eva Hesse, No Title
See this sculpture while you can; it's slowly deteriorating and rarely displayed. It's also considered one of the Whitney's treasures. The delicate piece was among the artist's last works (she died at age 34) and consists of a tangled mess of latex-dipped ropes, attached to the wall and ceiling in 13 places. Each time it's installed, there are minor variations in how it's hung, giving it a slightly different shape. "It's a paradigm-shifting work," explains the museum's chief curator, Donna De Salvo. "It captures that whole moment that was going on after Minimalism, moving beyond rigid objects defined by solid borders."
Where to find it: "Singular Visions," through July 17

Robert Grosvenor, Tenerife
This large, angular sculpture looks like a spacecraft from an episode of Star Trek, which isn't really that surprising considering it was made during the '60s space race. It's one of only two hanging sculptures by Grosvenor that still exist, and before this exhibition opened last December, it hadn't been displayed for four decades. De Salvo suggests walking around it to view it from different perspectives: "The horizontal element of the piece nearly disappears when looking at the work from behind." That's no small feat for a nine-foot-tall object.
Where to find it: "Singular Visions," through November

George Segal, Walk, Don't Walk
George Segal studied the streets of Manhattan before planning this plaster sculpture, in which three ordinary characters stand together under a pedestrian traffic light. Like real New Yorkers, they ignore each other while they wait for the light to change and convey isolation despite their close proximity. De Salvo notes another juxtaposition: "You have these ghostly, static figures in front of a sign that implies movement. It's quite dramatic." Although the pedestrians are plaster, Segal added a playful detail: the lady is clutching a real handbag under her arm.
Where to find it: "Singular Visions." Through July 17

Kevin Jerome Everson, Ninety-Three
Take the full three minutes to watch this enthralling slow-motion film of a 93-year-old man blowing out 93 candles on a cake. The candles are the only source of light in the shot; as they are slowly, almost painstakingly extinguished, the picture goes dark, eventually disappearing completely. "It's like a life in a moment," says De Salvo.
Where to find it: "More than That: Films by Kevin Jerome Everson." Through Sept 18

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