Interview - Steve Hogarth of Marillion

Marillion frontman Steve Hogarth ponders the demands of crowd-funding and the merits of cult status.

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Marillion Photograph: Jill Furmanovsky

You recently released a beautiful side project with Porcupine Tree keyboardist Richard Barbieri, Not the Weapon But the Hand. What sparked that outing?


You have to go back 15 years to when I first made a solo album, Ice Cream Genius. That was an attempt to explore whatever I could that was not Marillion, and an attempt to remind, if anyone needed reminding, that there was more to me than being the singer in this band. I immediately went to Clem Burke from Blondie and asked him if he would drum on it, and then Dave Gregory from XTC and Richard Barbieri from Japan. And Chucho Merchan, who was working with the Eurythmics at the time, played bass. I was very fortunate to run into [Porcupine Tree leader] Steve Wilson during the process of setting that up, and he played my demos to Richard Barbieri. Richard came in and played synthesizers on my solo album, and we became good friends.


He sent me an email one day, about two years ago, and said, "You don’t fancy making an album, do you, just the two of us?" And it was a great moment for me, because back in the ’80s I used to listen to Japan, Tin Drum, and I really appreciated Japan for what they were, which was this collection of musicians who’d completely redefined themselves and their own instruments. They were just shockingly innovative and one of my favorite ’80s bands—and the ’80s was my favorite decade, anyway.


It’s a very different record, different to just about anything except possibly Richard’s own solo work. You can immediately identify him…he’s one of the few synthesizer players and programmers who has completely, totally and utterly a sound of his own. A dark magic in everything he does, there’s this magical darkness—so I just tried to pour light all over it.


You do a lot of stylistic stretching on the album. Are those things that you only feel free to do outside of Marillion, or is that the kind of research and development that you would consider bringing back into the studio?


If you’d have asked me a few months ago, I’d have said, Yeah, sure, I’m going to try all this experimental stuff on the new Marillion album. But I’m currently putting down lead vocals for it, and there isn’t really the room, to be honest. With so many people expressing themselves at once, it starts to become a bit claustrophobic if I try and stick 15 voices on it and two people whispering and someone making a speech and a wall of other people muttering. [Laughs]


When you’re in the studio, is there a Marillion cop who says, “Oh, no, that’s not Marillion?”


There used to be, back in…I’d have to go back quite a way. But, I mean, it was a very white band when I joined, and so the black influences—it’s not like they weren’t allowed, it’s just that nobody felt that they could go there. And bit by bit we took black influences into the music, which…it’s kind of weird that we wouldn’t, because it all came from there in the first place, let’s face it. Even the whitest bands on earth, like Pink Floyd, are wrapped around what is essentially a blues guitarist, Dave Gilmour.


I was given the freedom day one to pull the thing toward myself—they said, do what you do and we’ll do what we do and we’ll see what happens—and in pulling Marillion in the direction of myself, they were inevitably pulled towards my own influences, which are quite black. So then gospel happened, and dub happened. It got into all that dark, weird stuff in Brave, and then Afraid of Sunlight became a very American sounding album. Maybe not sounding like American people, but rich with American themes.


The references to Elvis Presley and O.J. Simpson, and at least one song that sounds very much like Phil Spector.


Absolutely. We very carefully and deliberately crafted that to make it as Spectorish as we could, just as we introduced the Beach Boys elements in “…Surf…”


Oh, “Cannibal Surf Babe,” sure.


[Long pause] Not many people say, “Oh, ‘Cannibal Surf Babe,’ sure” in regular conversation! [Laughs]


You’re doing two nights in New York. Are the sets going to be different?


There won’t be one song played on night one that’s played on night two. There will be no songs in common. There will be two completely different set lists, with no songs in common. So if you miss one night, you’ve missed a whole show.


Are you showing off any of the new songs?


Yeah. I can’t promise how many, but it’ll be more than zero.


More than zero and less than the whole album, start to finish.


Definitely less than the entire album. We wouldn’t dare do the entire album, because we live in an age now where it would be on YouTube and there would be no point releasing it, then. [Laughs]


Users say

15 comments
Progman
Progman

SIMPLY THE BEST BAND EVER!!!!!

Marillionfan4life
Marillionfan4life

Great interview, great music, great band. Never been happier to be a fan.

marillion1@comcast.net
marillion1@comcast.net

Excellent interview Steve. "A better way of life". Marillion attracts Good and passionate people. All you have to do is listen to the music and lyrics. Pre-orders have nothing to do with any kind of charity at all. It's our contribution to " A better way of life". Mike Riley

todd cadle
todd cadle

as one of the following I am totaly in awe of what these guys can do and cant wait each time to hear what they do, in a world of mass production where you cant tell one artist from another this is what music and inspiration is about they arent Gods they are great creative people who are able to share the passion and joy with us and that is truely special in every way. Love these guys and all the fans

Andrew
Andrew

I have always respected the honesty of the guys in this band,their music & approach to their fan base. Having met them in March this year in Milton Keynes & spoken to them,it brought home to me how genuine and down to earth they are.The last 30 years of Marillion being in my life has flown by and long may it continue.

Michael Stead
Michael Stead

Brilliant interview Steve being down to earth and honest as usual. I LOVE THIS BAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

kevin
kevin

Like many of those that have posted here already, I have followed marillion for many years. To be precise, I first encountered the band almost 30 years ago iear1983 have seen tem in Scotland, England, Ireland Canada and next week I will make the short from the UK to Chicago to Add the US to the list. Why you may well ask? It's simple the pure brilliance of the combination that is marillion, the music, the fans and a band that is there fortheir fans as much as they are there for them :)

Mark
Mark

I thoroughly enjoy reading posts from fellow Marillion enthusiasts and sit in eager anticipation of the Toronto show next week. While I must often travel to see them (what's 100 miles each way for a little "medicine"?),I have not seen the band since 1992--in Toronto--during the "Holidays" tour. That show set the emotional and spiritual standard for ALL shows/concerts that I have attended since; needless to say, none can match the Marillion experience. Their music has evolved and changed over the years with one common denominator--the "connection" of sound and soul. H and Company have rescued me from myself countless times...Can't wait 'til Toronto.

Robin
Robin

Thank you so much for this article. H is right when he says that Marillion fans aren't going to shows for the entertainment, it's a spiritual part of who they are. The first time I heard Marillion (in just 2007 no-less) it was like coming home, and I have been a die-hard fan ever since. My husband and I have been to the Montreal convention and we will be flying down from Seattle to hit the San Fran show on the 29th. CANNOT WAIT!!!!

Esteban
Esteban

Love this band. I've been following them for years. All their releases are top notch... I saw them playing live in Mexico during the Marbles tour and it was really an unforgettable experience.

Paul
Paul

I have been a fan since the 80's, and I have supported the band in all the above mentioned ventures. My wife and I just saw the DC show, and I was once again impressed at how nice the band is, how kind all the fans are to each other, and how spiritual the fans find the band & their music. I met the band 20+ years ago, and met them again Sunday. They are the same, down to earth guys now as then. Although the 9:30 Club was packed to the gills, there was none of the rude pushing and shoving you see at most concerts. I wish I was independently wealthy and could follow them as they tour North America!

Simon Nash
Simon Nash

I think Steve is absolutely right when he talks about the way the fans feel about the music. It's developed way beyond an entertaining level. The music, the production and especially the lyric get inside you and become part of you. Sometimes it's a feel good medicine, But for the most part, it's a way of digging out those emotions locked away inside me. Try it yourselves! Get a copy of 'Brave' and follow the instructions on the back cover...

Manny Ferreira
Manny Ferreira

Marillion remains Britain's best kept secret. Just ask anyone who continues to follow them. Their sound remains fresh because they refuse to follow a formula. Listen for yourself. You can request a free sample CD or download of their music by visiting http://www.marillion.com

Manny Ferreira
Manny Ferreira

Marillion remains Britain's best kept secret.... just ask anyone who continues to follow them. Their sound remains fresh because they refuse to follow a formula. Listen for yourself. You can request a free sample CD or download of their music by visiting http://www.marillion.com

John
John

I have followed Marillion for years now and have always appreciated the music they create. I will be at the LA show supporting the worlds most underrated band