Photo tour of the West Village in New York City

Vintage charm coexists with modern amenities in the West Village, one of our favorite New York neighborhoods. See the historic homes and stylish residents in our photo tour.

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  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Erected in honor of local World War I soldiers, the Abingdon Square Doughboy statue stands as the park’s towering centerpiece. More than 20,000 New Yorkers gathered for its dedication in 1921, and thousands gawk at it each year as they pass through and relax in the quaint green space. Abingdon Square, Hudson St between Eighth Ave and W 12 St (nycgovparks.org)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Situated at the Commerce Street bend, these homes are just two examples of the neighborhood’s enviable real estate. One was built for 19th-century retail tycoon Alexander T. Stewart, while the other is Carly Simon’s former pad. 46 and 48 Commerce St

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    When seeking refuge from NYC’s perpetual hustle and bustle, those in the know head to this garden, a lush enclave at the Church of St. Luke in the Fields. Ideal for reading, admiring flowers or catching some rays, the two-acre sanctuary lures residents from all corners of the city. The Church of St. Luke in the Fields, 487 Hudson St at Grove St (stlukeinthefields.org, 212-924-0562)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    “I don’t live here but I wish I did!” says Adesewa Bertolazzi Eniola Adesuyi. Born in Nigeria and now living in Rome, the model posed for TONY at the corner of 11th Street and Seventh Avenue South while en route to meet friends.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Though many of the city’s old cobblestone streets have been paved in recent years, a few stretches still remain. Barnlike garage doors are a fitting match for this pathway, which lies on the cusp of the Meatpacking District.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    British ex-pats and Anglophiles alike get their UK food fixes at Myers of Keswick. Peter Myers, who hails from the shop’s namesake town, opened the shop in 1985. Since then, he and his family have supplied the city with homemade pork pies, English teas and royal-family memorabilia. Myers of Keswick, 634 Hudson St between Horatio and Jane Sts (myersofkeswick.com, 212-691-4194)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Aptly portraying the neighborhood’s European influences are two common West Village fixtures: New Yorkers enjoying authentic fish and chips at A Salt & Battery, and a sleek Vespa. A Salt & Battery, 112 Greenwich Ave between 12th and 13th Sts (asaltandbattery.com, 212-691-2713)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    This icy blue Vespa commands attention on Washington Place. While similar scooters zip through the streets, this one is often seen curbside.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Ask Pauline Migliorini, left, and Anita Coady how long they’ve lived in the neighborhood, and the longtime friends will first erupt with laughter, then offer these hints: Four generations of Migliorni women have married at Our Lady of Pompeii Church, starting with Pauline’s grandmother in 1904; and lifelong Villager Coady has raised five kids here. They love the area, but aren’t fond of the moniker “West”—they remember when their hood was simply the Village. The Church of St. Luke in the Fields, 487 Hudson St at Grove St (stlukeinthefields.org, 212-924-0562)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Greenery and flowers adorn an urn in the garden at the Church of St. Luke in the Fields. The Church of St. Luke in the Fields, 487 Hudson St at Grove St (stlukeinthefields.org, 212-924-0562)

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Open for less than a year, British den Whitehall Kitchen + Bar sates palates with hearty fare such as pork chops swimming in hard-cider sauce ($27). Here, the well-stocked bar is reflected in a mirror that looks like it was scribbled on by Will Hunting. 19 Greenwich Ave at W 10th St (212-675-7261, whitehall-nyc.com)

  • The West Village was shot with a Lubitel 166+ ($349), available at Lomography Gallery Store (41 West 8th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves; 212-529-4353, lomography.com).

Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

Erected in honor of local World War I soldiers, the Abingdon Square Doughboy statue stands as the park’s towering centerpiece. More than 20,000 New Yorkers gathered for its dedication in 1921, and thousands gawk at it each year as they pass through and relax in the quaint green space. Abingdon Square, Hudson St between Eighth Ave and W 12 St (nycgovparks.org)


RECOMMENDED: All New York neighborhood photo tours

The West Village is known for its picturesque charm, tasteful brownstone buildings and tree-lined streets. Hit TV shows have helped turn the area into a tourist destination, and an eclectic mix of restaurants and shops draws new residents in each year. But the neighborhood isn’t without its annoying quirks: It can be hard to navigate thanks to its off-grid street pattern, implemented before Manhattan’s structured layout was designed in 1811.

Here, antiquated structures such as hidden carriage houses on Charles Street exist alongside eateries, designer stores and gay bars, including the landmark Julius (159 W 10th St at Waverly Pl, 212-243-1928), which opened in 1862. Reminders of the neighborhood’s boho reputation, cemented in the early 20th century, are visible everywhere. Writer Edna St. Vincent Millay’s narrow home still stands at 75½ Bedford Street, and indie bookstore Three Lives & Company (154 W 10th St at Waverly Pl, 212-741-2069), reportedly named for a Gertrude Stein piece, lives on.

Youthful energy abounds, and celeb sightings can be frequent (Sarah Jessica Parker and Courtney Love are two stars who have West Village pads). But amid the trendy spots and historical markers, you’ll find stalwarts like Pauline Migliorini. Her husband, Renato, runs corner trattoria Piccolo Angolo (621 Hudson St at Jane St, 212-229-9177), which they’ve owned for 20 years. During her off time, she can often be found kicking back with fellow Villager Anita Coady in the lush garden at the Church of St. Luke in the Fields (487 Hudson St between Barrow and Grove Sts; 212-924-0562, stlukeinthefields.org). Like many area dwellers, her ties to the ’hood are long-standing: Migliorini, her mother and her daughter were all married at Our Lady of Pompeii Church (240 Bleecker St at Carmine St, 212-242-4147), a tradition that started with her grandmother’s nuptials in 1904.


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