13 worthy Oscar winners to stream on Netflix tonight

0

Comments

Add +
  • Marlon Brando, Best Actor, 1955, On the Waterfront

  • Hearts and Minds, Best Documentary, 1975

  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Best Visual Effects, 1992

  • The Red Shoes, Best Art Direction, 1949

  • Black Narcissus, Best Cinematography, 1948

  • Purple Rain, Best Song Score, 1985

  • La Strada, Best Foreign Language Film, 1957

  • The Exorcist, Best Sound, 1974

  • Linda Hunt, Best Supporting Actress, 1984, The Year of Living Dangerously

  • Bram Stoker's Dracula, Best Costume Design, 1993

  • Barry Lyndon, Best Cinematography, 1976

  • The Virgin Spring, Best Foreign Language Film, 1961

  • The Third Man, Best Cinematography, 1951

Marlon Brando, Best Actor, 1955, On the Waterfront

Mouse over a photo for more information and click it to stream on Netflix.

Baby it's cold outside, so gather the family round the sickly light of your monitor: TONY's 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time list is perfect Netflix fodder, but since "neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds" no longer (or ever) describes the U.S. Postal Service, we've found the 13 films on the list that you can stream online and have included links to their Netflix pages (once you've logged in).Mix yourself a winter drink and settle in—here we go:

Marlon Brando, Best Actor, 1955, On the Waterfront
"I coulda been a contender!" cries Terry Malloy. Yet for the already-thrice-nominated actor who played him, the role finally turned Marlon Brando into a winner. The brooding star had revolutionized acting with A Streetcar Named Desire (1952), but his tough, tender take on Waterfront's working-class hero was something else entirely. Once the Bowery brute delicately handled Eva Marie Saint's glove, you could divide screen performances into two categories: before and after Brando. This Oscar win solidified his standing as the greatest actor of his generation—a reputation he'd try to live down for the rest of his career.—David Fear
Play now

Hearts and Minds, Best Documentary, 1975
One of the rare movies to openly criticize the Vietnam War while it was still going on, Peter Davis's look at the U.S.'s imperialist jaunt in Southeast Asia portrayed the military as morally unsound goons; its win signaled an acknowledgment that the antiwar movement had reached critical mass. A damning, defining vrit landmark, Hearts and Minds also underlined the era's generation gap at the Oscar ceremony itself: After Davis read a statement from the Viet Cong during his acceptance speech, presenter Frank Sinatra publicly distanced himself from the remarks. Privately, he allegedly offered to smash the director's face in.—DF
Play now

Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Best Visual Effects, 1992
Think back to the first time you watched Robert Patrick's sleek killer robot slowly regenerate its metallic surfaces like molten steel. Did I actually see what I think I just saw? Groundbreaking doesn't begin to cover what T2's four-man visual-effects team—Gene Warren Jr., Robert Skotak, Stan Winston and Dennis Muren—managed to do in this sci-fi action behemoth; game-changing would be more accurate, as every blockbuster from Jurassic Park to the Lord of the Rings trilogy would adopt the film's CGI ber alles mentality. The Academy didn't just salute a crack team of FX experts, it also nodded to the future of digital filmmaking: a series of ones and zeroes bringing flights of fancy to life.—DF
Play now

The Red Shoes, Best Art Direction, 1949
If the recent restoration of this ballet classic proves nothing else, it's that the movie's dynamic art-direction duo—Hein Heckroth and Arthur Lawson—knew how to use vivid color and creative sets for maximum impact. Look at that cobbler's shop! The velvet green interior of that coach! Those titular pieces of footwear!—DF
Play now

Black Narcissus, Best Cinematography, 1948
In Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's classic, a group of British nuns set up shop in a windy Himalayan palace; Jack Cardiff's searing Technicolor imagery helps to project their torments of the flesh. It's cinematography as psychology—particularly inspiring to next-gen American filmmakers like Martin Scorsese.—Keith Uhlich
Play now

Purple Rain, Best Song Score, 1985
The image of Academy voters getting down to Prince's "Darling Nikki" is a strange one indeed. But it only demonstrates the influence of the High Priest of Pop, whose inimitable music and mesmerizing performance style made us feel like we were glimpsing the future.—KU
Play now

La Strada, Best Foreign Language Film, 1957
The Academy inaugurated its official (as opposed to merely honorary) foreign-film award with one of vintage Italian cinema's best. Federico Fellini's circus-performer tragedy helped turn on countless Americans to the joys of reading subtitles, and significantly broadened the domestic audience for non-English-language movies. Molto grazie, Oscars.—DF
Play now

The Exorcist, Best Sound, 1974
The creativity that went into this picture is scary: First came the vocal talents of sprightly Mercedes McCambridge as the voice of the demon—treated, slowed, reversed. Then came Gonzalo Gavira, the recordist behind the trippy El Topo, who utilized mushy eggs and a plucked comb to create the sounds of head-spinning terror.—Joshua Rothkopf
Play now

Linda Hunt, Best Supporting Actress, 1984, The Year of Living Dangerously
And Russell Crowe thought Gladiator was hard. Try performing across genders (and, let's not forget, races). The character of Billy Kwan is Chinese; he's also Australian and a dwarf. Hunt, a New Jersey--born stage actress, did a total transformation and tore eyeballs away from the then-sizzling Mel Gibson.—JR
Play now

Bram Stoker's Dracula, Best Costume Design, 1993
Clothes make the man (and the monster): The exotic capes and headpieces that Eiko Ishioka designed for Francis Ford Coppola's operatic horror film were a singular achievement, so eye-catching that you couldn't help but be dazzled and seduced.—KU
Play now

Barry Lyndon, Best Cinematography, 1976
For their stately costume drama, director Stanley Kubrick and cinematographer John Alcott procured three of NASA's Zeiss lenses (developed for moon landings), enabling them to film certain sequences by candlelight. The results? Luminous. Inspired by the example, future filmmakers like James Cameron pushed the boundaries of technology.—KU
Play now

The Virgin Spring, Best Foreign Language Film, 1961
Ingmar Bergman's superb medieval morality tale took the prize and cemented the Swedish master's stateside reputation. Its influence would be felt most prominently—and rather bizarrely—at the grindhouse: Wes Craven adapted the revenge story to contemporary America and called it The Last House on the Left.—KU
Play now

The Third Man, Best Cinematography, 1951
Carol Reed's 1949 noir boasts a svelte Orson Welles playing a man of mystery, along with a killer zither score. But it's Robert Krasker's luscious black-and-white imagery that truly sets the tone: a nightmarish Vienna of canted angles, dark shadows and romantic fog.—JR
Play now

Users say

0 comments