Live photos: The Kills at Terminal 5

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  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

Dark, transatlantic duo the Kills played Terminal 5 last night, following an appearance at Chicago's Lollapalooza, and their moody blues-rock was balanced by the openers: local indie faves the Pains of Being Pure at Heart and A Place to Bury Strangers. When the lights eventually dimmed for the glamorous headliners, Irish DJ-personality BP Fallon took the stage to hype the crowd with a spoken-word rendition of "I Believe in Elvis Presley," a play on John Lennon's "God" that was met with cheers from the crowd. Finally, Jamie Hince and Alison Mosshart strutted onto the stage, unequivocally (and somewhat predictably) looking the part of distressed and totally sexy rock & rollers in their layers of black garnments and ready-to-be-whipped, messy hair.

Without a word to the audience, the duo launched into "Future Starts Slow," off of their fourth studio album, Blood Pressures. Highlights of the set included the heavily blues-influenced "DNA" (which featured two backup singers); "Pots and Pans," in which Mosshart unleashed a fury over the scantily used drum kit; and the surprisingly raw "The Last Goodbye," which was part of the three-song encore. Hince (who recently married Kate Moss) kept a rather mellow presence and let his creative partner--muse Mosshart rule the stage—and did she ever. Whether writhing like a tortured soul, daintily tiptoeing to and fro, or pacing around the mike like a feral cat, her alluring voice kept fans mesmerized. At times a fierce howl, a raspy whisper or a vulnerable coo, her soulful voice stole the show and closed the set with a bang with a cover of Marilyn Monroe's "One Silver Dollar." TONY photographer Lizz Kuehl was on hand to capture all the dark, steamy action.

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