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Best New York restaurants by neighborhood: The best places to eat now

Our New York neighborhood restaurant guides point you to the best places to eat, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots.

Photograph: Jeffrey Gurwin
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Restaurants

Astoria restaurant guide

Our Astoria restaurant guide points you to the best places to eat in the neighborhood, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots. Known for its Greek tavernas and Egyptian eateries, this Queens nabe is increasingly gastronomically diverse. Our Astoria restaurant guide includes a superior Thai spot and a standout café. There are also plenty of cheap eats and select brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Astoria, Queens Arharn Thai Here’s one for your short list of local (or worth-the-trip) Thai eateries. Arharn is Thai for “food,” and the dishes are as uncomplicated as the name. Ingredients are sliced, diced, wokked, tossed and sauced with rugged confidence. Chicken-coconut soup is thick and meaty, but be prepared: If you ask for it hot, you’ll get it fiery. Crunchy fried chunks of meat are drenched in a gingery lime bath for duck salad. Soft-shell crabs, when available, are sautéed in garlic; complement them with a noodle or curry dish. For dessert, try the lychee or durian ice cream. The Astor Room Thirty years ago, a restaurant like the Astor Room might have sizzled like the ’21’ Club, with its live entertainment on a baby grand, a buttoned-up barman pouring stiff drinks, and tables crowded with warm Parker House rolls and complimentary bowls of crisp crudités. As a period piece, that first impression feels right—ragtime on the stereo, tiled walls and Tiffany lamps, a stuffed and posed beaver behind an imposing oak bar. Even the crowd—mostly gray-haired on one recent

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Restaurants

Chelsea restaurant guide

The Chelsea restaurant scene is constantly shifting—our critic-approved selection includes trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. The arrival of The NoMad, a block away from cult hits The Breslin Bar & Dining Room and The John Dory Oyster Bar, has boosted the Chelsea restaurant scene and cemented the neighborhood’s northeast corner as a hot dining destination. You’ll also find top-notch barbecue and tapas spots, plus plenty of cheap eats and great brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York Boqueria Given that Boqueria is named for Barcelona’s centuries-old food market, you might expect the menu to lean toward the classics. Not quite. Chef Seamus Mullen’s bacalao (salt cod), a standard tapas ingredient, is served here as an airy and crisp beignet. The most successful sangria is an unorthodox beer-based version that mixes lager, pear puree, lemon juice and triple sec. The Flatiron location is small and the bar area packed; a better bet is the 16-seat communal table, where you can nibble shaved jamón under the glow of filament bulbs. Meanwhile, the Soho branch is a less manic scene, more than twice as big and nearly twice as inviting. There, diners can see into the open kitchen, where exceptional classics like fluffy salt-cod croquetas, and dates oozing cabrales cheese are realized. Caveat emptor: While the big flavors that made the first spot a sensation have successfully transitioned farther downtown, so too have the minuscule portions. The Breslin Bar & Di

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Restaurants

Chinatown restaurant guide

Our Chinatown restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Between Kenmare and Worth Streets, Mott Street is lined with restaurants representing the cuisine of virtually every province of mainland China and Hong Kong; the Bowery, East Broadway and Division Street are just as diverse. The choice is overwhelming, but our Chinatown restaurant guide will help you narrow it down, whether you crave fiery Szechuan cuisine or Peking Duck; also check out our picks for cheap eats and brunch.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chinatown, New York Grand Sichuan Grand Sichuan’s comprehensive menu comes with an annotated booklet describing the history and cooking process for each of the 100-plus dishes. Szechuan cuisine is based on heat, so prepare for a meal that is not only mouthwatering but eye-watering as well. The dandan rice-noodle starter, loaded with dried peppercorns, will open your sinuses. Waiters routinely caution those who order the memorable braised beef in chili sauce—it’s an inferno on a plate. Panfried au zhao chicken offers equally addictive flavor with less heat. Experiment, because gems abound on the menu, and you have nothing to lose but your fear of fire. Peking Duck House Your waiter parades the roasted duck past your party beforeplacing it on the center show table. A chef brandishes his knives dramatically, then slices the aromatic, crisp-skinned, succulent meat with great flair. Folks

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Restaurants

East Village restaurant guide

Our East Village restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. The East Village has a knack for sprouting reasonably priced eateries that draw cult followings. No East Village restaurant guide would be complete without mention of David Chang’s enduringly popular Momofuku Noodle Bar, which spawned his mini empire, and other top toques—including Peter Hoffman with Back Forty and Daniel Boulud with DBGB Kitchen and Bar—have set up shop in the nabe. Northern Spy Food Co. has become a locavore staple for its earnest (and delicious) devotion to seasonal cooking. Also consult our curated lists of cheap eats and great brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to East Village Back Forty Chef-restaurateur Peter Hoffman (Savoy) is behind this seasonal-eats tavern, where farmhouse chic prevails in the dining room (vintage tools adorn the walls) and on the menu. Gastropub fare—like the pleasantly gamey grass-fed hamburger or pork jowl nuggets, frozen in a crisp jacket of batter—is uniformly solid. Veggies shine too: Baby cauliflower gratin is layered with leeks and Gruyère, and the exemplary brussels sprouts are slicked with cherry butter and served with shallot puree. Desserts uphold the pub end of things: Conclude with a creamy stout float. DBGB Kitchen and Bar Chef Daniel Boulud doesn’t do decent, so-so or almost great. Even as he branches out around the world—with outlets in Palm Beach, Beijing and Va

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Restaurants

Harlem restaurant guide

Our Harlem restaurant guide points you to the best places to eat in the neighborhood, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots. Known for soul food and the West African eateries of “Little Senegal” (W 116th St between St. Nicholas Ave and Morningside Park), the neighborhood’s restaurant scene has been revitalized by the arrival of Marcus Samuelsson’s eclectic hot spot Red Rooster Harlem, which spawned a subterranean lounge, Ginny’s Supper Club. Our Harlem restaurant guide also includes cheap eats and select brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Harlem, New York Chez Lucienne Harlem gains an ambitious French bistro from Daniel alums Jerome Bougherdani and chef Matthew Tivy. The 60-seat space, with its globe lights and powder-blue banquettes, evokes a classic bistro, while dishes from the Lyon, France-born executive chef, Thomas Obaton, range from the traditional (beef bourguignonne) to the bold (calf’s-foot croquettes). Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Weathered gas-station signage and barbershop mirrors constitute the artfully gritty decor at this honky-tonk saloon. The old Harlem meatpacking warehouse sees a heady parade of low-country favorites like fried-green tomatoes, chicken wings and beer-boiled shrimp. But true ’cue lovers should go straight for the meat: Fork-tender beef brisket, succulent ribs and juicy pulled pork get a dry rub, up to 18 hours of smoking over hickory, apple and cherry woods, and are finished with a slather of sweet-spicy secret sauce. Lido The team behin

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Restaurants

Hell’s Kitchen restaurant guide

Our Hell’s Kitchen restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Daisy May’s BBQ USA Southerners know that the best barbecue comes from run-down shacks in the worst parts of town—so don’t let the location of Daisy May’s BBQ USA, on a desolate stretch of Eleventh Avenue, or its college-town atmosphere deter you: Daisy May’s, despite a few missteps (the pulled pork is overstewed in its own sauce), is the real down-home deal, a masterful barbecue survey. The Kansas City Sweet & Sticky Pork Ribs are meaty and just tender enough, while the creamed corn tastes like ballpark nachos—and that’s a good thing. The sweet tea with mint leaves will make you long for a front porch. Skip the desserts for a side of bourbon peaches, which calls to mind a drunken cobbler. Don Antonio by Starita While tourists bumble into Sbarro looking for a New York slice, pizza aficionados have been busy colonizing this pedigreed newcomer—a collaboration between Kesté’s talented Roberto Caporuscio and his decorated Naples mentor, Antonio Starita. Start with tasty bites like the frittatine (a deep-fried spaghetti cake oozing prosciutto cotto and béchamel sauce), before digging into the stellar wood-fired pies, which range from standards such as the Margherita to more creative constructions like the Rachetta, a racket-shaped pizza with a “handle” made of ricotta-stuffed dough. The main event, however, should be the habit-fo

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Restaurants

Little Italy and Nolita restaurant guide

Which restaurants in Little Italy and Nolita stand out from the sea of red-sauce joints and trendy eateries? Check out our critic-approved selection. Though Manhattan’s traditional Italian stronghold is being squeezed out by Chinatown and Nolita, there are still some good Italian restaurants in Little Italy, including a venerable pizza joint, and new-school spots like Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm are revitalizing the locale. There are also some culinary gems in Nolita.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Little Italy and Nolita Café Habana Nolita’s fashion-forward crowd storms this chrome corner fixture for the jumping scene and addictive grilled corn: char-grilled golden ears doused in fresh mayo and generously sprinkled with chili powder and grated cotija cheese. Staples include a respectable Cubano and crisp beer-battered catfish with spicy mayo. For dessert, try the eggy caramel flan. Those not willing to suffer the wait for a table can hit the takeout annex next door—you can get that corn, on a stick, to go. Da Nico If out-of-town guests insist on visiting Little Italy, steer them toward charming Da Nico. The solid red-sauce fare includes spaghetti with a chunky bolognese and entrées like hearty veal chops and salmon, simply grilled and spritzed with lemon. Keep an eye on the brick oven in the restaurant’s foyer—crisp pizzas emerge from it, topped with sweet sauce and plenty of melted mozzarella. If that doesn’t quell your rumbling belly, the gratis plate of piping-hot zep

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Restaurants

Long Island City restaurant guide

The dining scene in this Queens nabe is constantly evolving—our list of the best restaurants in Long Island City includes trusty favorites and new hot spots. The Long Island City restaurant scene has been steadily improving for years, but Quebecois chef Hugue Dufour took local dining to new heights in 2010 with M. Wells, a classic diner that moonlighted as a world-class restaurant. Sadly, it shuttered in summer 2011, but more than a year later, Dufour resurrected his eclectic menu at M. Wells Dinette in MoMA PS1, which ranks among the best restaurants in the neighborhood.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Long Island City, Queens, New York Manetta’s Ristorante This terra-cotta-tiled trattoria is tended by members of the Manetta clan—the kitchen, which turns out homestyle Pan-Italian eats, is capably supervised by matriarch Filomena. Her wood-burning brick oven produces marvelous crisp-crusted pizzas with toppings like spicy cacciatorini sausage, porcini mushrooms and house-made pesto. The pasta is a triumph: Linguine with four cheeses drips with lush Gorgonzola, mozzarella, fontina and Parmesan—ideal for pre-P.S.1 carbo-loading. M. Wells Dinette Circumstances, such as natural disasters and irascible landlords, can conspire to sink even the buzziest restaurant. And long lines outside don’t always translate to a cushion against trouble. M. Wells, among the most celebrated debuts of the past few years, brought Quebecois gluttony to New York, turning a remote corner of Queens into a hot

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Things to do

Lower East Side restaurant guide

Our critic-approved roundup points you to the best restaurants on the Lower East Side, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Lower East Side pioneers wd~50 and Freemans paved the way for many a hot table in the neighborhood—San Francisco import Mission Chinese Food has joined the list of best restaurants on the Lower East Side. But don’t dismiss classic eateries from the pre-hipster era, including one of the city’s best Jewish delis.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Lower East Side Frankies Spuntino 17 Clinton Street The Manhattan outpost of Frankies is as beloved as the Brooklyn original. The no-reservations policy keeps a steady crowd angling for a table most evenings, and though there are just 26 seats, the restaurant feels cozy—not cramped. Nibble on cheeses, cured meats and salads, including a stellar combo of watercress, caramelized apple and Gorgonzola, while sipping one of 12 wines by the glass. If grazing isn’t your thing, more filling fare includes fork-tender porchetta with gigante beans and fennel agrodolce. Freemans This Lower East Side restaurant has come to be regarded as the tastemaking cabin-in-the-’hood at the end of the now-legendary alley. In the oft-copied taxidermied environs, the hearty menu additions include a charred tender quail atop buttery grits, and a generous rabbit roulade entrée of boneless bacon-wrapped bunny (the signature bar snacks remain—there wasn’t even a question of tampering with the cult artichoke dip). Simple desserts—caramel

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Things to do

Park Slope restaurant guide

Our Park Slope restaurant guide points you to the best places to eat in the neighborhood, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots. Fifth Avenue is the nexus of the Park Slope restaurant scene. Our critic-approved list includes a longtime fixture that ranks among New York's best Italian restaurants, and Top Chef contender Dale Talde’s eponymous eatery, which reflects the current trend for cutting-edge Asian cuisine. There are also several bars with notable kitchens, including recent arrival Pork Slope.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Park Slope, Brooklyn al di là Aspiring restaurateurs in Park Slope should study this convivial Fifth Avenue pioneer. Nine-year-old al di là remains unsurpassed in the neighborhood. Affable owner Emiliano Coppa handles the inevitable wait (due to the no-reservations policy) with panache. The wait is worth it for co-owner and chef Anna Klinger’s Northern Italian dishes. It would be hard to improve on her braised rabbit with black olives on steaming polenta; even simple pastas, such as the homemade tagliatelle al ragù, are superb. Beet Beet is a small word for a Park Slope restaurant with a big concept. Pat Rodsomarng, who owns Mango nearby, has opened a modern Thai eatery and is cooking both traditional dishes and his own French-inspired inventions. Every meal begins with a basket of beet chips and continues with your choice of salads, soups, noodles, dumplings, curries, or boozy innovations like cognac ginger beef or red snapper with champagne-vani

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Comments

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karoline c
karoline c

why is there a big black box covering every single article on this site???