Best restaurants of 2011

As the year comes to a close, TONY's Food & Drink team recalls the year's most memorable meals. What were yours?

0

Comments

Add +
  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    The Dutch

    The Dutch

Photograph: Jolie Ruben

The Dutch

The Dutch

Jay Cheshes, critic

The Dutch
New York's most enduring dining institutions are the ones most impervious to trends. You won't find barrel-aged Negronis at Peter Luger or reclaimed wood at Grand Central Oyster Bar and La Grenouille. It's nigh unheard-of, in fact, that any new restaurant comes to deserve a mention in the same breath as those stalwarts. But the Dutch comes awfully close—the overnight classic emerged fully formed this year as the clubhouse I didn't know I was missing. Sure, there are a few nods to voguish restaurant trends: well-mixed cocktails, a fried-chicken platter. But Andrew Carmellini's eclectic menu of melting-pot soul food feels ageless: The meals I've consumed here have been the most viscerally satisfying of 2011, even squeezed in tight at the bar, thunderous with the murmurs of downtown Brahmins. My fickle  cravings were satisfied one night with oyster sliders, shrimp and grits, and a steak tartare dressed like Caesar salad. Another evening it was lamb-neck mole and a rabbit potpie, at once soothing and exciting. The Dutch is simultaneously a chophouse, a raw bar, a spot for great ethnic eats. These prismatic charms incorporate all the things I love most about eating in this town beneath one warm tavern roof. 131 Sullivan St at Prince St (212-677-6200)


Jordana Rothman, editor: St. Anselm
Chris Schonberger, associate editor: Robataya NY
Jay Cheshes, critic: The Dutch
Mari Uyehara, writer: Isa

Users say

0 comments