Best steakhouses in New York

Porterhouse, sirloin and rib eye to die for.

1/9
Photograph: Courtesy Keens

Keens Steakhouse

2/9

Peter Luger

3/9

Three Filets entre at Quality Meats

 

4/9
Photograph: Noah Devereaux

St. Anselm

5/9
Photograph: Lauren Foy

Sparks Steakhouse

6/9
Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

Porterhouse Steakhouse

7/9

Strip House

8/9
Photograph: Ben Rosenzweig

Wolfgang's steakhouse

9/9
Photograph: Dan Eckstein

Sammy's Roumanian Steak House

There are moments in the life of a carnivore that call for a steak—the kind of celebratory confabs that demand to be marked with a napkin tucked beneath your chin, a steak knife clutched in your fist, and a juicy slab of beef in a pool of its own juices on the table before you. That’s why we’ve compiled this list of the very best steakhouses in NYC—from old New York classics that peddle in porterhouse behemoths, to new-wave meateries where you can get your sirloin or rib eye with a side of gnocchi. Did we miss your favorite NYC steak joint? Join the conversation in the comments.

Keens Steakhouse

Critics' pick

Sirloin and porterhouse (for two and three) hold their own against any steak in the city at this 124-year-old slice of history. The ceiling and walls are hung with pipes, some from such long-ago Keens regulars as Babe Ruth, J.P. Morgan and Teddy Roosevelt.

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Chelsea North

Peter Luger

Critics' pick

Although a slew of Luger copycats have prospered in NYC, none have captured the elusive charm of this stucco walled, beer-hall style eatery, with its well-worn wooden floors and tables, and waiters in waist coats and bow ties. The famous porterhouse—44 ounces of sliced prime beef—is a singular New York experience that’s worth having.

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Williamsburg

Quality Meats

Critics' pick

Michael Stillman—son of Smith & Wollensky founder Alan Stillman—shuttered Manhattan Ocean Club, a seafood palace in midtown, and replaced it with this highly stylized industrial theme park complete with meat-hook light fixtures, wooden butcher blocks, white tiles and exposed brick. Lespinasse-trained chef Craig Koketsu nails the steaks and breathes new life into traditional side dishes. Pudding-like corn crème brûlée and the airy “gnocchi & cheese,” a clever take on mac and cheese, are terrific. High-concept desserts are best exemplified by the outstanding coffee-and-doughnuts ice cream crammed with chunks of the fritters and crowned with a miniature doughnut.

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Midtown West

St. Anselm

Critics' pick

Grilling may be the ultimate American art form, but New York restaurants rarely explore its greaseless, flame-licked potential. With St. Anselm, Joe Carroll delivers one of the city’s most impressive exceptions. The well-rounded menu, heavy on veggies, combines Mediterranean, Asian and all-American flavors, but head chef Yvon de Tassigny uses the simple cooking method to tie it all together—from smoky slabs of halloumi to miniature fire-roasted eggplants with fried goat cheese and honey. Main-event proteins include a charred hanger packed with earthy flavor—as fine a slab of beef as is available at any hoary steakhouse in town.

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Williamsburg

Sparks

Critics' pick

Sparks used to be a mob hangout. Now it’s just mobbed. Even with a reservation, you may have to wait for an hour at the cramped bar. It’s worth it: The signature sirloin is a lean 16-ounce prime hunk with a salty, lightly charred exterior. Savory beef scaloppine and steak fromage (filet mignon topped with Roquefort) are also outstanding. When your fork slides through a velvety wedge of chocolate mousse cake, you’ll feel sorry for Gambino crime boss Paul Castellano, who was famously whacked as he approached the entrance in 1985: He died before enjoying his last good meal.

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Midtown East

Porter House New York

This restaurant from chef Michael Lomonaco (Windows on the World) is part of the all-star lineup at the Time Warner Center. Inside the sexy brown-and-tan interior, portions are large and prices are fair. The steaks get a glorious char, and the wine list offers 500 labels to choose from, including a selection of half bottles.

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Upper West Side

Strip House

Strip House cultivates a retro-sexy vibe with its suggestive name, red furnishings and vintage pinups. But it’s still a modern meat shrine flaunting French influences. Executive chef John Schenk makes sure his New York strips arrive at your table still sizzling, seasoned with sea salt and peppercorns, and showing no sign of extraneous fat. Order the New York strip and you’ll experience the sublime combination of a perfectly charred outside with a luscious rare-red inside. Everyone will enjoy the black-truffle creamed spinach, one of several gourmet takes on classic steak sides.

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Greenwich Village

Wolfgang’s Steakhouse

Critics' pick

It was a gamble for Wolfgang Zwiener, a former Peter Luger waiter, to open his own steakhouse in midtown in 2004, and riskier still for him to attempt an offshoot of his offshoot. But this is one of the best (albeit priciest) restaurants of its ilk. The steaks kick ass: They’re thick, juicy and charred enough to be flavorful without tasting like carbon. Big groups can order porterhouses for two, three or four; and solo diners can dig into a filet mignon, rib eye or sirloin and not feel like they’re getting the second-best item on the menu.

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Tribeca

Old Homestead Steakhouse

Opened in 1868 as a dockworkers’ chophouse, this clubby establishment draws a laid-back New York crowd (MePa’s glamazons need not apply). But even those finicky eaters would be impressed by starters such as a tender-as-sashimi seared yellowfin tuna, and by ever-fresh raw bar selections. Still, folks come here for the beef. Spring for the flavorful strip steak, or a well-seasoned prime rib. Any way you carve it, this place stands the test of time.

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Chelsea

Sammy's Roumanian Steak House

Walk into this LES rathskeller on a crowded evening and you may think you’ve stumbled into a bar mitzvah—Yiddish sing-alongs and folk dancing are ignited by the live synthesizer and further fueled by icy shots of vodka. The very Eastern European menu includes saline chicken liver, garlicky karnatzlack sausage and enormous beef tenderloins, all of which are hearty enough to slow down the hora. The sparse decor may be dated, but the prices aren’t: Order carefully or you’ll lose your dowry paying for your meal.

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Lower East Side

Comments

4 comments
Tyrone Bobby Joe H
Tyrone Bobby Joe H

The first picture on this article looked more like a regular house than a steakhouse! I'm definitely going to have to visit some of these places the next time I visit New York! I'm looking for a couple steakhouses in my area right now. Hopefully I find something good! http://www.bardis.com/ 

K Bear
K Bear

List is a joke. St Anslem? Really? Just because a restaurant offers a steak on the menu doesn't make them a steak house. Even Time Out's review doesn't suggest any steaks to eat - but vegetables and lamb. St Anslem could be a great restaurant, but when the title says "Best STEAKHOUSE in NYC" the list should contain ACTUAL STEAKHOUSES.

douglas kris
douglas kris

You are missing the oldest one in NYC, Delmonico's