Frozen treats!

Cool down with the summer's newest crop of sundaes, pops, ice-cream sandwiches and more.

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  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    Imperial Woodpecker Sno-balls
    Southern transplant Neesa Peterson is behind these New Orleans--style "sno-balls" ($4 and up), made with an ice-shaver imported from the Big Easy. The slush soaks up flavors like the orange-and-cream Dreamsicle and the almondlike Butter Cream. Serious sugar fiends should pair the Mardi Gras King Cake syrup with a dollop of sticky condensed milk ($1 extra), or Birthday Cake (pictured) with a scoop of vanilla ice cream ($1 extra) and a flourish of rainbow sprinkles. 124 MacDougal St between Bleecker and W 3rd Sts (251-366-7777)

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Victory Garden
    Situated just a block from frozen-treat meccas Grom and Popbar, this tiny artisanal outfit fills a worthy niche: Goat's-milk soft-serve ($3--$7), friendly to the lactose-intolerant, is made in-house with fresh dairy from Beltane Farm in Connecticut. With a uniquely tangy and tart backbone, rotating flavors like basil-mint and rose petal are creamy, savory and refreshingly grown-up; dress them with high-minded toppings such as crushed halvah, stewed rhubarb and Liddabit honeycomb. 31 Carmine St between Bedford and Bleecker Sts (212-206-7273)

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

    Wooly's Ice

    After traveling to Hawaii and Taiwan, cousins Danny Che, David Sat and Kenneth Sa decided to combine the shaved-ice traditions of both locales into one treat at this stand (daily noon–7pm; $5 and up). They use a Hawaiian ice-shaver to create remarkably fluffy ice that hits your lips like powdery snow. It's flavored, Taiwanese-style, with a sweet kiss of condensed milk or green tea, then drizzled with fresh-fruit syrups and piled high with toppings like plump blueberries and homemade brownie chunks. South Street Seaport, Fulton St at South St (917-885-3919)

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    Coolhaus

    The ice-cream sandwich takes a postmodern turn at this frozen-treats truck, where the overstuffed behemoths put the Chipwiches of your youth to shame. First, choose a cookie; the chewy discs are available in varieties such as potato-chip butterscotch. Then, get a baseball-size scoop—or two, if you're prepared to get messy. The flavor combos are endless, ranging from mescal with banana honey to double chocolate with sea salt (each $6). Follow @coolhausny on Twitter for locations.

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Amorino
    The smooth gelato at this Parisian import is laced with locavore-be-damned goodies like speculoos biscuits from Belgium and mangos from India. While the spatula-wielding staff can arrange flavors into a rose bloom of artful ice-cream petals, the foccacina ($7.50) provides a neater package: Flavors such as vivid Ecuadorian banana are stuffed into a light brioche, then heated like a panino and dusted with powdered sugar. The bread stands up well, and the pressed sides prevent the contents from squelching out onto the sidewalk. 60 University Pl at 10th St (212-253-5599)

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    Nana's

    Former Pies 'n' Thighs baker Cecile Dyer is among the lively cast of restaurant-world vets slinging artisanal eats at Smorgasburg, the Brooklyn Flea's new food-only offshoot. Her passion project is frozen bananas ($5 and up), a county-fair staple that she coats in a rich, dark-chocolate armor and showers with toppings like sea salt, shredded coconut and colorful sprinkles. Because each banana is dunked to order, the chocolate sauce cools to a wonderfully soft, smooth consistency rather than becoming overly brittle and cracking into shards. 27 North 6th St between Kent Ave and the East River, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (brooklynflea.com). Saturdays and Sundays only.

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Ample Hills Creamery
    You can watch your ice cream being made at this bustling new scoop shop. Sci-fi writer turned dessert whiz Brian Smith begins each batch with the same creamy base comprised of top-notch local eggs and dairy, then carefully develops each offbeat flavor (one scoop $3.90). Pints of Sixpoint Otis Stout combine with dark chocolate and chocolate-covered pretzels to create one malty, salty-sweet knockout, while bits of homemade French toast are smashed into maple-cinnamon ice cream for the Sunday Brunch. 623 Vanderbilt Ave at St. Marks Ave, Prospect Heights, Brooklyn (347-240-3926)

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Culture: An American Yogurt Company
    If you haven't thought about fro-yo since the Pinkberry craze died down, this Park Slope outfit will get you back on the bandwagon in a hurry. Its superlative version starts with tangy house-made yogurt, produced on-site by combining antibiotic-free, hormone-free local milk with a proprietary yogurt culture. It's sweetened and frozen to create four rotating soft-serve flavors; order them straight-up or in delicious sundaes ($4.50 and up) like the Key Lime Pie, which deploys tart lime custard and crumbled graham crackers. 331 Fifth Ave between 3rd and 4th Sts, Park Slope, Brooklyn (718-499-0207)

  • Photograph: Jolie Ruben

    Brewla Bars
    Siblings Rebecca and Daniel Dengrove draw on their lab-coat lifestyles---she's a food scientist, he's a molecular biologist---to create these pops ($3). Brewed beverages give each variety a purported health benefit, such as an immunity boost from the red tea in the Hero (pictured). Our favorite is the Doctor, which blends root-beer spices like sarsaparilla with calcium-rich dairy to simulate an ice-cream float. Saturdays: Market Share booth, Smorgasburg, 27 North 6th St between Kent Ave and the East River, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (brooklynflea.com) * Sundays: Fulton Stall Market, South Street Seaport, South St between Beekman and Fulton Sts (fultonstallmarket.com)

Photograph: Jolie Ruben

Imperial Woodpecker Sno-balls
Southern transplant Neesa Peterson is behind these New Orleans--style "sno-balls" ($4 and up), made with an ice-shaver imported from the Big Easy. The slush soaks up flavors like the orange-and-cream Dreamsicle and the almondlike Butter Cream. Serious sugar fiends should pair the Mardi Gras King Cake syrup with a dollop of sticky condensed milk ($1 extra), or Birthday Cake (pictured) with a scoop of vanilla ice cream ($1 extra) and a flourish of rainbow sprinkles. 124 MacDougal St between Bleecker and W 3rd Sts (251-366-7777)

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