The Feed first look: Carbone

Rich Torrisi, Mario Carbone and Jeff Zalaznick (Torrisi Italian Specialties, Parm) expand to the Greenwich Village with their third New York restaurant.

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Tortellini a la ragù at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Bass oreganata at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Seafood salad at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Half grapefruit at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Crostoli at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Limoncello and fig-and-fennel-infused grappa at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Old-Fashioned at Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Carbone

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Photograph: Jessica Lin

Carbone

Chef wunderkinds Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone—the trailblazing duo behind Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm—graduate to empire-building status with their third high-flying joint: a 72-seat tribute to mid-20th-century red-sauce relics opening March 8th. As at their Nolita hot spots, the pair will breathe new life—with primo ingredients and Café Boulud–trained technique—into nonna standards, culled from old-school genre masters like Rao’s and the menu archives at the New York Public Library. The food-historical toques will dispatch chicken scarpariello (cotechino sausage, morel mushrooms and piquillo peppers), ragù-slicked tortellini and lobster Fra Diavolo. The retro-inspired decor in the time-honored Rocco’s space recalls 1950s New York: Servers bustle around the blue-and-white tiled floor (inspired by similar flooring seen in The Godfather) in vintage-style tuxes designed by Zac Posen. Sepia-toned art curated by cine-kid Vito Schnabel (son of director Julian) lines the walls. The bar—crafted from hand-carved walnut with mother-of-pearl inlays—highlights Italian and American wines, as well as classic cocktails from Manhattans to mai tais, overseen by decorated drink vet Thomas Waugh (former Death & Company head bartender). 181 Thompson St between Bleecker St and W Houston Sts (212-254-3000)

Comments

1 comments
Tony T.
Tony T.

Wow, looking at those pictures starts to make me wonder. Looks like Over-Worked Foo-Foo Food ... I thought they were Promising Old-School Italian-American? Those dishes in the pictures don't look Old-School to me .. I live in the neighborhood and was a fan of Rocco's for years. Was sorry to see Rocco's go, but figured this guys might do the space good. Now after having seen these pictures of Foo-Foo-Italian, it gets me wondering. I plan on going soon (They Opened Yesterday) to check out for myself, and I'm hoping for the Best and that these Guys leave they Crappy-Arrogant-Attitude behind when moving into the Storied Italian Greenwich Village ... Tony, a Italian-American Greenwich Village Native