Top ten best dishes and drinks

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  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Rosejat Rpida at Salinas

    Rosejat Rpida at Salinas
    Spanish cuisine buffs will recognize this Catalan dish as a close cousin of fideu---a paella riff made with short noodles instead of rice. Chef Luis Bollo toasts vermicelli, then simmers the broken strands in a savory bath of chicken stock fortified with sofrito and aromatics until the noodles soak up the flavors of the broth. The finished dish, which incorporates poached chicken, chorizo and briny cockles, gets its competing textures from a toss with creamy saffron aioli aerated in a siphon and a handful of the still-crunchy toasted noodles. 136 Ninth Ave between 18th and 19th Sts (212-776-1990). $24.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Rabbit potpie at the Dutch

     

    Rabbit potpie at The Dutch
    When a gracious server tried to break the towering, crackerlike crust that caps Andrew Carmellini's delirious potpie, we scolded him: "It's like you just opened our Christmas present!" There is serious satisfaction in busting through the puffy dome---which is speckled with sea salt and looks like some sort of Land of Oz mushroom---to pillage the hearty stew within. Shreds of D'Artagnan bunny, braised in stock, riesling and hard cider, mingle with a selection of vegetables such as Tokyo turnips and baby potatoes. Crack the shell (the staff-administered service point has been retired) to release its intense aroma. 131 Sullivan St at Prince St (212-677-6200, thedutchnyc.com). Returns to the menu in mid-October; $27.

  • Photograph: Noah Devereaux

    Blood-orange doughnut at Dough

     

    Blood-orange doughnut at Dough
    It remains to be seen whether the doughnut is the new cupcake, as so many breathless bloggers have mused, but we'll happily bide our time at this Bed-Stuy doughnut shop, which turns out the city's most alluring new rounds. Among the many funky flavors, we like the glinting fuchsia blood orange best: freshly fried gargantuan rings of stretchy, yeasty dough, slathered with tart citrus glaze and crowned with a candied slice of the fruit. 448A Lafayette Ave at Franklin Ave, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn (347-533-7544). $2.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Grapefruit Givr at Boulud Sud

    Grapefruit Givr at Boulud Sud
    Could a frozen grapefruit filled with sorbet really be a contender for most exciting new dessert of the year? Pastry chef Ghaya Oliveira makes it so with this whimsical sweet, which is stuffed with halvah crumbles and house-made rose-scented loukoum, topped with flossy halvah cotton candy and black-and-white sesame tuile. 20 W 64th St between Broadway and Central Park West (212-595-1313, danielnyc.com). $13.

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    The Whole Mishpucha at Mile End

    The Whole Mishpucha at Mile End
    This family-style feast, served in a cast-iron cauldron, is as restorative as a fistful of echinacea. The rich chicken noodle soup floats a gorgeous arrangement of folksy comforts: wispy, chicken-liver-stuffed kreplach (dumplings), coins of softened carrots and greens, and the city's most exalted matzo balls. 97A Hoyt St between Atlantic Ave and Pacific St, Boerum Hill, Brooklyn (718-852-7510, mileendbrooklyn.com). $12 per person.

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Earl's Eggo at Earl's Beer & Cheese

    Earl's Eggo at Earl's Beer & Cheese
    If the brash, comfort-food-obsessed, high-low-blurring zeitgeist of NYC dining in 2011 had to be summed up in one dish, this might be it: An Eggo waffle that's drizzled with thickened maple syrup and stacked with aged Cabot cheddar, coffee-cured bacon and rich slabs of grilled foie gras. It's head-scratching, a bit demented and just about the best thing we've eaten in a bar all year. 1259 Park Ave between 97th and 98th Sts (212-289-1581, earlsny.com). $17.

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Rib eye at RedFarm

    Rib eye at RedFarm
    There are those who might shake their fists at the notion of applying anything other than salt, pepper and fire to a nicely marbled Pat LaFrieda Creekstone Farms rib eye. Those people need to book it to RedFarm. The luscious beef here is a triumph of balance and simplicity: an overnight bath in soy and papaya tenderizes the meat, and an expert sear teases out its umami richness. It's served simply, ringed with blossoms of stir-fried bok choy. 529 Hudson St etween Charles and W 10th Sts (212-792-9700, redfarmnyc.com). $37.

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Grilled sardines at St. Anselm

    Grilled sardines at St. Anselm
    Those who enjoy the elemental pleasures of the grill will love these flame-licked sardines. Head chef Yvon de Tassigny works the fish just right---a slick of citrusy ponzu sauce, a quick char over the smoky fire, and a bit of olive oil and Maldon salt to finish them off. Served with grilled toast and house-pickled lotus roots, the dish is as satisfying as it is simple. 355 Metropolitan Ave between Havemeyer and Roebling Sts, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (718-384-5054). $10.

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Tajarin al sugo d'Arrosto at Manzo (Eataly)

    Tajarin al sugo d'Arrosto at Manzo (Eataly)
    The "no morsel left behind" ethos of traditional Italian cookery is on brilliant display in this Piedmontese classic. Chef Michael Toscano reduces pan drippings from slow-roasted beef ribs (the meat is used in another dish) to create a deeply flavorful sauce, fortified with veal and beef bones and finished with butter. The ethereal gravy naps fine ribbons of tajarin, a rich egg-yolk pasta, topped with a crumble of nutty and funky Castelmagno cheese. 200 Fifth Ave between 23rd and 24th Sts (212-229-2180, eatalyny.com). $21.

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Absinthe Colada at Maison Premiere

    Absinthe Colada at Maison Premiere
    What Pegu Club did for gin and Mayahuel did for mescal, newcomer Maison Premiere has done for absinthe, nudging the anise-flavored spirit---a subtle accessory in many classic recipes---into the spotlight. Bartender Natasha David's gutsy pia colada spin is a beautiful showcase of the liquid's range: A glug of minty Germain-Robin absinthe transforms the pia's usual posse of rum (a rich aged Jamaican variety, in this case), coconut cream and pineapple juice into an herbaceous and balanced peculiarity, pierced with a fragrant bundle of mint. 298 Bedford Ave between Grand and South 1st Sts, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (347-335-0446, maisonpremiere.com). $14.

Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

Rosejat Rpida at Salinas

Rosejat Rpida at Salinas
Spanish cuisine buffs will recognize this Catalan dish as a close cousin of fideu---a paella riff made with short noodles instead of rice. Chef Luis Bollo toasts vermicelli, then simmers the broken strands in a savory bath of chicken stock fortified with sofrito and aromatics until the noodles soak up the flavors of the broth. The finished dish, which incorporates poached chicken, chorizo and briny cockles, gets its competing textures from a toss with creamy saffron aioli aerated in a siphon and a handful of the still-crunchy toasted noodles. 136 Ninth Ave between 18th and 19th Sts (212-776-1990). $24.

Users say

1 comments
Fuego Grande
Fuego Grande

Blood-orange doughnut at Dough - OH MY GOODNESS!!! Nothing more to say! Go! Dough!!