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The best restaurants in Tribeca, New York

The Tribeca restaurant scene is constantly shifting—our critic-approved selection includes trusty favorites and the latest hot spots.

Photograph: Lizz Kuehl
Brushstroke

When you’re done looking around the neighborhood’s best shops and bars, treat yourself to dinner at one of the neighborhood’s respected eateries. With figures like Robert De Niro and chef David Bouley behind several of the area’s more famous offerings, you know you can expect to be served something special. From steak to sushi, Tribeca has it all.


RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Tribeca, New York

A.B. Biagi

São Paulo native Antonio Barros Biagi updates traditional gelato with Brazilian flavors. At the bright yellow storefront—outfitted with Brazilian street photography—Biagi churns ice cream using organic milk, in exotic varieties like basil–pine nut and açai-banana. Alongside the cold treats, the store also sells packaged coffee beans.

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Nolita

American Cut

In a city brimming with kitchen rock stars, it takes a lot more than a Food Network show to attract attention. At American Cut, Iron Chef Marc Forgione isn’t turning heads so much as laying down a safe bet. Unlike his other recent debut—Khe-Yo, the city’s first Laotian hot spot—his brassy Tribeca steakhouse delivers more of the same to a city already pumped up with marbled meat and Barolo. A spin-off of his Atlantic City original, it’s a playpen for high-rolling carnivores, suffused with wafting scents of singed fat and smoke-laced bourbon.

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Tribeca

Bâtard

Following Michelin-starred chef Paul Liebrandt's abrupt departure from Corton for the Elm in August 2013, Drew Nieporent has changed gears, enlisting chef Markus Glocker (Gordon Ramsay at the London) to infuse a multicourse European tasting menu with touches of his native Austria: roasted beets "Linzer" with caramelized hazelnuts and red currants; baked turbot with egg yolk and salted pumpkinseeds; and a rabbit "flavors of bouillabaisse" with saffron ravioli and sauce rouille. France dominates the wine list, with a solid lineup of white varietals from the restaurant's namesake, Bâtard-Montrachet.

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Tribeca

Bouley

Briny raw oysters out of the shell, wrapped in raw scallop and topped with osetra caviar, have a primal deep-ocean quality. A slow-poached egg in a far richer appetizer, meanwhile, comes swaddled in buttery polenta and sunchoke puree, with coconut-garlic broth and whisper-thin Serrano ham shards. Our favorite: butter-poached lobster with pomegranate pinot noir sauce, chicken with almond puree and black truffles, chocolate frivolous—Bouley is nothing if not a master of the saucier's art. Tables are all well lit and well spaced. The most romantic have a view of the fireplace and are illuminated by candelabras instead of table lamps.

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Tribeca

Brushstroke

The ever-changing seasonal menu, which rotates through 5,000 dishes that talented import Isao Yamada spent years testing, is best experienced as an intricate multicourse feast known as kaiseki. A meal might start with muted petals of raw kombu-wrapped sea bass, before building slowly toward a subtle climax: asparagus tips with pristine lobes of uni leading to earthy stewed pork cheeks with cider reduction and green-apple puree. In keeping with the basic tenets of this culinary art form, the savory procession concludes with a rice dish—top-notch chirashi or seafood and rice cooked in a clay casserole—and delicate sweets such as creamy soy-milk panna cotta.

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Tribeca

The Butterfly

The cocktailcentric supper club showcases the heady creations of master mixologist Eben Freeman (also the restaurant group's beverage director) at a 13-seat bar, backed by a wooden wall cut to resemble open butterfly wings and a shadow-box mirror. Choose from original and midcentury concoctions, like the crème de menthe–based Grasshopper and the brandy old-fashioned. Booze-friendly bar bites also riff on classics, with comforting dishes like bratwurst sliders, a patty melt and ricotta ravioli with pork ragù.

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Tribeca

China Blue

Like its older sibling, China Blue feels fashionable, but not overdressed in its 1930s decor. Wang and Zhang have switched from Café China’s chili-spiked Szechuan to the much tamer flavors of Shanghai for their sophomore effort, but they’ve retained their trademark aesthetic. The high-ceilinged, teal-swabbed dining room is unlike the city’s other exemplars of the regional cuisine, showcasing antique lamps, worn books and old typewriters like Art Deco calling cards. Young waiters whisk delicate, crab-rich soup dumplings ($10) to tables, while smartly dressed couples sip classic cocktails from etched-glass coupes. Where Café China relies on the one-two punch of chilies and Szechuan peppercorns, China Blue offers subtler interplays among salty, smoky and sweet.

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Tribeca

Daruma-ya

This 40-seat izakaya—taking over the space atop Sushi Azabu—spotlights ramen's high-maintenance cousin, soba. Noodle master Shuichi Kotani turns out fresh tangles every 30 minutes, grinding imported Japanese buckwheat by stonemill and boiling it for exactly 20 seconds. The resulting strands are deployed in eight dishes, topped with roasted duck, Japanese bottarga or grated yam. Beyond the noodle bowl, Nobuhito Dosei (of L.A.'s Michelin-starred Mori Sushi) dispatches sushi and small plates: live scallops with smoked salt and yuzu juice; deep-fried tofu with nameko mushrooms in dashi; and kobe beef with wasabi and oroshi-ponzu sauce.

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Tribeca

Distilled NY

Inspired by historic American public houses that served as social anchors of towns and neighborhoods for centuries, Distilled is located in a landmarked space in the heart of Tribeca designed to create a welcoming and communal atmosphere. The menu offers a wide variety of regional American dishes as well as a beverage program that includes specialty cocktails, wine, craft beer and a selection of meads. We look forward to having you and your friends as our guests.

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Tribeca

Dylan Prime

On weeknights, the candlelit dining area hosts the usual alpha pack. On weekends, however, it works its magic on couples sharing cozy banquettes near the room’s centerpiece, a see-through wine cellar. Starters are made for swapping bites: The house-made garganelli is loaded with lobster chunks, rock shrimp and smoked bacon. For a lighter touch, order the mustard-studded salmon tartare. Move on to any of the five cuts of dry-aged steaks; you can mix and match crusts and sauces (try Maker’s Mark bourbon sauce with your rib eye). There’s no reason to go sober into that good night: Finish with an espresso martini or one of the Pie-Tinis—drinks that taste like their dessert counterparts.

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Tribeca
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