You need to know about: BMW Guggenheim Lab

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  • Photograph: Paul Warchol

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

  • Photograph: Roger Kisby

    Urbanology interactive game

  • Photograph: Roger Kisby

    Urbanology game

    Urbanology interactive game

  • Photograph: Paul Warchol

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

  • Photograph: Paul Warchol

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

  • Photograph: Paul Warchol

    Roberta's Cafe

    Roberta's Cafe

  • BMW Guggenheim Lab

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

  • Photograph: Paul Warchol

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

    BMW Guggenheim Lab

  • Photograph: Kristopher McKay

    BMW Guggenheim Lab Location

    BMW Guggenheim Lab site before construction

  • Photograph: Courtesy BMW Guggenheim Lab

    Atelier Bow-Wow

    Atelier Bow-Wow

Photograph: Paul Warchol

BMW Guggenheim Lab

BMW Guggenheim Lab

With all the hubbub surrounding admission hikes at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the American Museum of Natural History, it's refreshing to hear that an instution is giving back and reaching out, rather than asking for more from its visitors. That's what German auto maker BMW and the Guggenheim museum set out to accomplish with their ambitious BMW Guggenheim Lab (E Houston St at Second Ave; bmwguggenheimlab.org; Wed, Thu 1--9pm; Fri 1--10pm; Sat, Sun 10am--10pm; free). With a design from Tokyo firm Atelier Bow-Wow, the institution turned a gritty East Village corner—owned and essentially forgotten by the Parks department for 75 years—into a temporary urban oasis that organizers hopes will stimulate all kinds of forward thinking about arts, culture, sustainability and urban planning within New York City.

The mobile carbon-fiber structure, a stylish cross between a greenhouse and Victorian train station, will come down in mid-October so it can be sent to Berlin and then Mumbai. During its ten-week New York engagement, the Guggenheim has planned more than 100 free events touching on the theme of cities and sustainability. The sleek structure will house an interactive Urbanology video game, developed by Long Island City's Local Projects, that allows visitors to weigh their priorities (for example, players have to decide whether they would rather sacrifice the safety of bright street lights to save electricity and money), and Brooklyn eatery Roberta's will set up an outpost next to the lab. Plus, lectures from well-known names—including Gabrielle Hamilton, the chef of nearby Prune, and The Wire and Treme creator David Simon—are sure to pack the open-air structure.

 

 

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