Most stylish New Yorkers: Jordan Bradfield

The choreographer and nightlife denizen adds color to his wardrobe with Pop Art--inspired pieces and S&M gear.

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  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield refers to this as his "safari" look. "I am obsessed with prints, and the crocodile print on the sleeves and back is major," he says of the patterned top, part of Versace's collection for H&M (locations throughout the city; visit hm.com). He found his Dolce & Gabbana pants at a now-closed thrift store in the East Village, and the brown army boots at Kaufman's Army & Navy (319 W 42nd St between Eighth and Ninth Aves, 212-757-5670). He also wears his mother's vintage rabbit-fur coat.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    "I named this necklace Juan Carlo," says Bradfield of his bull-head pendant from Topshop (478 Broadway between Broome and Grand Sts; 212-966-9555, topshop.com). "I love the old Southwestern feel it has; it's similar in shape to a bolo tie, and I live for a bolo tie." He found the gold rectangular ring at the Bargain Stop (33-02 30th Ave at 33rd St, Astoria, Queens; 718-777-0797 * 458 Fifth Ave between 9th and 10th Sts, Park Slope, Brooklyn; 718-832-0797 * bargainstopdiscountstore.com). "This ring is very cheaply made---that's what originally drew me to it," Bradfield says. "I knew it was going to age quickly and that is a quality I love in pieces, as I prefer all of my clothes to look very worn. I think it adds instant character." 

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    The picture-frame watch is part of Jeremy Scott's collection for Swatch. "They are the best pop of fun for any outfit," enthuses Bradfield. His navy belt was found at an Astoria Goodwill (locations throughout the city; visit goodwill.org).

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    "This is my 'urban warfare' look," explains Bradfield. He pairs black Uniqlo pants ("an homage to Dickies," he says) with a vintage Gianni Versace button-up from Screaming Mimi's. "This print is so complex, I could stare at it forever," he explains. "It reminds me of the tiling in old Roman baths."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield's quirky Mickey Mouse high-tops are from Jeremy Scott's collection for Adidas. "Jeremy is a friend of mine," notes Bradfield. "These shoes are one of the key pieces in my wardrobe: I can put them with any look, and it automatically adds a great Pop twist to the entire aesthetic."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    He adds another subversive twist to the outfit with a harness, which he found at Purple Passion DV8 (211 W 20th St between Seventh and Eighth Aves; 212-807-0486, purplepassion.com). "I love knowing I'm wearing items intended for bondage and not fashion, because it adds that level of attitude to a look." He got the spiked cuff in middle school, during "my Hot Topic goth phase." Both the black-crystal-studded crocodile bracelet and his ring are by Swarovski (1540 Broadway between 45th and 46th Sts; 212-764-7936, swarovski.com).

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    "This is my bad-boy-from-Catholic-school look," says Bradfield. While some of the items---such as his vintage Givenchy Homme sweater---are luxe, most of the outfit was found at Goodwill. "I love pairing high-end pieces with Dumpster finds---true style should be eclectic, not bought each season."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    According to Bradfield, this Jeremy Scott for Adidas jacket "fits my style aesthetic to a T---it's very hard in its motorcycle nature, but has an added level of refinement with the coattails in the back." The pill-patterned bag is Jeremy Scott for Longchamp, and was part of the designer's 2011 collection, Candyflip. "It's the perfect blend of pop and punk," says Bradfield.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Like many of his finds, this brown studded glove came from Goodness Gracious Thrift Shoppe (3013 30th Ave between 30th and 31st Sts, Astoria, Queens; 718-777-0494). "A man had just dropped off an entire bag of old S&M gear to the store, and I just so happened to be there when he left---it was a major score," he says. His belt is from Rural King, a farming-goods store in Indiana.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield pairs his Versace for H&M boots with patterned socks from East Village mainstay the Sock Man (27 St. Marks Pl between Second and Third Aves; 212-529-0300, thesockman.com). "I think socks are a great way to add commentary to an outfit," he notes.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield's "Pop war" look was inspired, in part, by Occupy Wall Street. "I made the police brutality shirt after seeing a photo of an 84-year-old woman who had been pepper-sprayed by police at an Occupy Wall Street rally," he explains. "I paired it with vintage jewelry that reminded me of my own grandma and a Jeremy Scott Mickey-printed cardigan to add a Pop contrast to the aggressive nature of the shirt." Bradfield used to wear the camouflage pants to high-school football games and he admits he "never could seem to part with them."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    "My eyes just flew to the gaudy cluster of mother-of-pearl," recalls Bradfield of the day he discovered this necklace in Astoria's Furniture Market (22-08 Astoria Blvd between 21st and 23rd Sts, Astoria, Queens; 718-545-3935, myspace.com/thefurnituremarket). "It was the perfect mix of hideous and amazing; I instantly saw it paired with half of my suits and knew it was a must-have. I wear it religiously." The black crystal broach is from the Goodwill (32-36 Steinway St between Broadway and 34th Ave, Astoria, Queens; 718-932-0418, goodwillny.org), and he scored the pins on his jacket at a Brandi Carlile concert for free. "I love wearing things [that evoke a] memory---they instantly fill me with the energy I associate with the specific piece."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    These studded Converse sneakers were modified by local designers Obesity and Speed.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield accessorizes this look with another Jeremy Scott for Swatch wristwatch, and bracelets found in Belize, Los Angeles and a New York City street fair.

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    For this ensemble---which Bradfield describes as "Studio 54 glam-grunge"---he wears one of his mother's vintage fur coats with a Ksubi blazer, leopard-print pants from Trash & Vaudeville (4 St. Marks Pl between Second and Third Aves, 212-982-3590), and black Doc Martens. "I love these pants because they make me feel like David Bowie when I wear them."

  • Photograph: Chiara Marinai

    Bradfield incorporates handmade items, including the chain-link necklace, with older pieces---the black costume pearls were his grandmother's, and he bought his cuff in middle school. The black ring is Swarovski crystal. "It looks like a bolt, giving it a very masculine quality, but it's solid black crystal, so it also has a level of glam that I love," he explains.

Photograph: Chiara Marinai

Bradfield refers to this as his "safari" look. "I am obsessed with prints, and the crocodile print on the sleeves and back is major," he says of the patterned top, part of Versace's collection for H&M (locations throughout the city; visit hm.com). He found his Dolce & Gabbana pants at a now-closed thrift store in the East Village, and the brown army boots at Kaufman's Army & Navy (319 W 42nd St between Eighth and Ninth Aves, 212-757-5670). He also wears his mother's vintage rabbit-fur coat.

Jordan Bradfield, 24; choreographer, stylist and nightlife host (fleetingobsession.tumblr.com); Astoria, Queen

His personal style: "It's very much a reflection of growing up an artistically minded child surrounded by rurally minded people, having [been raised] in Santa Claus, Indiana—a town of 2,000. I love to take references that all of middle America can recognize and add a level of subversion to them. For instance, taking vintage women's clothing and wearing it within a very masculine infrastructure. I guess you could say my style is a complete objectification of Americana with the intent to provoke."

His style inspiration: "I decide each morning how I want to be perceived by the world, and formulate that perception with my dress. I have a reference file with more than 2,000 categorized images that I draw inspiration from. However, in the sense that my style is only defined by the idea of the objectification of American society, I would have to say my biggest inspiration is Andy Warhol. Warhol's art and views on both society and pop culture have been the biggest inspiration in all facets of my life."

His favorite stores: "The upper level of Screaming Mimi's (382 Lafayette St at 4th St; 212-677-6464, screamingmimis.com) is filled with amazing vintage finds from the archives of Versace, Jean Paul Gaultier, Comme des Garons, Vivienne Westwood and more. It's basically heaven. You can find any vintage item of clothing you could ever think of stuffed within the endless racks at No Relation Vintage (204 First Ave between 12th and 13th Sts; 212-228-5021, norelationvintage.com), and it's all so cheap! It's a regular haunt for me, and definitely my favorite place in the city to find great jackets and coats. I find the best accessories while walking around Astoria and looking through the vast amount of bargain stores out there. They've produced so many amazing, random finds for me, and I love nothing more than telling everyone they cost 99."

Favorite local designers: "The designers of Obesity and Speed (obesityandspeed.com) are both really good friends of mine—I basically live in their clothes. They are the epitome of downtown grunge-chic. Their clothes are all produced, destroyed and screened by hand in New York, so each is one-of-a-kind. Pamela Love's (pamelalovenyc.com) jewelry is the perfect mix of darkness and decadence. I also think Zana Bayne's (zanabayne.com) leatherwork is pretty amazing. I love the idea of a leather harness to add that level of subversion to any suit or T-shirt, and Zana Bayne does them like no other."

His signature item: "My hair is my favorite accessory. I love to dye my hair solid, vibrant colors like turquoise, pink and purple to add an element of fun to my life. I think hair is one of the most underappreciated accessories. If only we all lived in that town in Edward Scissorhands."

His New York fashion icon: "Michael Alig. He was another small-town boy from Indiana who created his own reality with the way he dressed each day. I just keep my looks a little more chic."

How his career influences his style: "I'm surrounded by artistic people who are not afraid to push boundaries and are willing to think in ways beyond what they were taught. It's a very conducive environment for personal growth and exploration. Also, working as a door host, you see anywhere from 800 to 1,500 people a night; you're bombarded with street style from all walks of life. You'll find more ingenious ways to wear clothing on the streets than you will on the runways."

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