Most stylish New Yorkers: Tziporah Salamon

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  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon layers a child's double ikat kimono from Japan's Edo period, which she bought at an ethnographic show in Santa Fe from a favorite dealer, Chinalai Tribal Antiques (chinalai.net), over a 1920s Shoanai Sashika jacket from Hirosaki, Japan made of tie-dyed Shibori fabric. "It's a very fine piece that I absolutely fell in love with when I saw it hanging on a wall at one of the Asian textiles shows years ago," she says of the latter garment. "It took me a year to pay it off, but it's more than paid for itself in that I live in it." Her indigo Chinese pants hail from the '20s and are also from Chinalai. "They're my dungarees---and they're fading beautifully."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Both the pink gold International Watch Co. wristwatch and gold initial ring, which served as a wedding band, are heirlooms from Salamon's parents. The sculptural ivory bracelets inlaid with emeralds, diamonds and rubies were a flea-market find.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon estimates that this thick ivory cuff from India is "around a hundred years old. I bought it at a flea market from a woman who wanted to part with it because it was a gift from an ex-boyfriend and she did not want to have it around."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    This clutch, made from old fabric from Central Asia, was purchased at the Cancer Care Thrift Shop (1480 Third Ave between 83rd and 84th Sts; 212-879-9868, cancercare.org).

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon's dramatic headpiece is actually two hats stacked together: She uses a simple beaded cap from a flea market as the base and tops it with a Yunnan chicken hat---so named for its poultry-like shape---from the late 19th or early 20th century. "What's interesting is that neither hat works on its own---they only look good together," notes Salamon. "I had them both for years and didn't wear them; then one day, I got the idea to try them together, and voil! They worked." She bought the vintage earrings at the Pier Antiques Show (stellashows.com) to pair with her chapeaus.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon sports thick-soled Jill Sanders shoes.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon spotted this Ralph Lauren men's jacket in the store window while on the way home from a dinner party, and "I knew I had to have it," she gushes. "I knew it would work brilliantly with these Comme des Garons pants and socks and hat; I saw the whole outfit right then and there. I came the next day and it was the last one left in the whole company. It was huge on me, but Anna, the store's brilliant seamstress, worked her magic."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon bought this bejeweled fez at the Manhattan Vintage Clothing Show (manhattanvintage.com), while the earrings come from the Pier Antiques Show. "Alas, I lost one," she laments. "So I had my brilliant jeweler, Joe Rissin (10 W 47th St between Fifth and Sixth Sts, room  902, 212-575-1098), who can do anything, make me a pair copying the one earring I still had."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    "I adore paisley and can't get enough," says Salamon, referring to her Etro gloves from Bergdorf. She bought the Turkoman silver cuff with gold inlay and carnelian stones in Jerusalem. "The bracelet was in the shop window and I was on my way to the post office to send money back to New York for my apartment," she recalls. "I went in, asked the price, the dealer put it on the scale and said '$500,' and I told him I only had $400 cash. I was late on the rent, but at least I got the bracelet!"

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Fair Isle--printed socks that were "probably from Barney's sock department, which is the best," add a graphic punch to Yohji Yamamoto lace-up shoes.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    "These pants are copies of an old pair of Armani knickers that I bought when I worked at Barney's on 17th Street and we were allowed one outfit at half-off," explains Salamon. "I keep having them copied in different fabrics and colors; they're my favorite pants." She wears them here with a vintage jacket. "The weight of the sleeves is unbelievable and the construction is brilliant," she enthuses.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon purchased these matching Bakelite cuff bracelets separately, ten years apart from one another. "I was very lucky to find two of them," she admits. "They're rare." She bought the vintage gloves from vendor Katy Kane (katykane.com) at the Modern Show. "They feel like butter."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon spotted this structured hat as she was leaving the Pier Show a few years back. "I had to have it, but I had no more money," she recalls. "I asked [the vendor] if he could hold it for me and he said no, he was packing everything up and sending it to a movie set. My heart fell, but then I reached into my pocket and lo and behold, I found two $20 bills---enough to cover the $35 price tag."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    This jacket from the '30s was the first vintage piece Salamon bought in New York City. ("It was in the early '80s from a store on the Upper West Side called Alice Underground," she recalls.) She tops it with an Issey Miyake scarf and finishes the look with Paul Smith pants.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    All of Salamon's accessories---from the gloves to her Mark Cross alligator clutch and '40s silver-link bracelet---are vintage.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Striped socks from Barney's spruce up an old pair of Jimmy Choo flats.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    A vintage Persian lamb cap and mother-of-pearl earrings make this outfit look luxe.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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     Both the Comme des Garons pants and Yohji Yamamoto coat were purchased at now-defunct boutique Linda Dresner. "I just love the bustle look of the coat and decided to make it period," Salamon says of her decision to pair it with an early-Victorian silk collar.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon wore this 1860s beaver top hat from the Pier Show while celebrating President Obama's inauguration in New York "as a tribute to him, because Abe Lincoln was his favorite president."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon scooped up these 1940s drop earrings from the Antiques Garage (112 W 25th St between Sixth and Seventh Aves, hellskitchenfleamarket.com).

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    These vintage shoes from the '40s were never worn when Salamon bought them. "I just love the way white socks go with them---kind of an old-fashioned schoolteacher look."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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     A patterned Jean Paul Gaultier blouse complements a pair of men's striped pajama pants from the '40s in a similar shade of maroon. "I bought these pants in the early '80s and have worn them to death," admits Salamon. "My brilliant seamstress has restored them over and over, patching them, backing the holes and giving them new life."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Salamon tops off her look with a Comme des Garons coat and a scarf that was "given to me 24 years ago when I saw it on a Japanese man," she recalls. "I complemented him on it and he took it off his neck and handed it to me. I've cherished it ever since."

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    This early-'20s woven paisley coat was discovered at the erstwhile 25th Street Flea Market, while the capelet came from the Pier Show.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    "The perfect headwear for smoking a pipe of opium whilst reading a slim volume of Baudelaire," muses Salamon of her silk hat from Aleppo, Syria.

  • Photograph: Zenith Richards

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    Practically a perfect match to her capelet, Salamon bought this hand-stitched paisley-fabric clutch at the Antiques Garage.

Photograph: Zenith Richards

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Salamon layers a child's double ikat kimono from Japan's Edo period, which she bought at an ethnographic show in Santa Fe from a favorite dealer, Chinalai Tribal Antiques (chinalai.net), over a 1920s Shoanai Sashika jacket from Hirosaki, Japan made of tie-dyed Shibori fabric. "It's a very fine piece that I absolutely fell in love with when I saw it hanging on a wall at one of the Asian textiles shows years ago," she says of the latter garment. "It took me a year to pay it off, but it's more than paid for itself in that I live in it." Her indigo Chinese pants hail from the '20s and are also from Chinalai. "They're my dungarees---and they're fading beautifully."

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