Nicholas Kratochvil

The BBlessing designer models his best outfits; we show you how to get the look.

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  • GET HIS LOOK!

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  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

  • GET HIS LOOK!

Kratochvil bought this Thom Browne madras shirt off a friend. The broken-in...

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Photographs: Krista Schlueter

Nicholas Kratochvil, 27, menswear designer for BBlessing (bblessing.com), East Village

His personal style: “It’s a classic American look of basics. I love color.”

His inspirations: “The cinema inspires my style more than I’d say musicians do. Jacques Tati’s Monsieur Hulot character is a big influence, as are Alain Delon in Jean-Pierre Melville’s films and Jean-Paul Belmondo in Godard’s [movies]. That’s all very French, but I’ve found that these characters’ eccentricities and quirks in dress show up often in what I wear out of the house.”

Favorite stores: “I’ve called BBlessing my workplace and home since its inception, so I buy the majority of my clothing there; I have the opportunity to wear my own creations, which I take advantage of. I also like Barneys: There’s a nice selection of designers and price points, and they get very creative with their merchandising, which I appreciate. I go to Other Music for their selection of reissued albums. The staff there is knowledgeable without being snobs and always happy to guide me so that I don’t overlook anything.”

His signature piece: “My Dana Lee black bag has been with me every day for years. When I find a piece I like, I usually wear or use it until it breaks or stinks or until the seasons change. It becomes a sort of uniform, or identifier, and I don’t mind this.”

Favorite designers: “As far as New York goes, I am a huge fan of Thom Browne’s (thombrowne.com) basics. I also like Patrik Ervell (patrikervell.com), who has been able to make what I think is the perfect pair of pants. I like Rogan’s (rogannyc.com) skills with creating a graphic identity. The Rag & Bone (rag-bone.com) guys and Tim Hamilton (timhamilton.com) are also very strong. I also like Fingers Crossed (thefingerscrossed.com), a much newer collection, that I hope will get the recognition it deserves.”

How he describes New York style: “The color black. Black is boring. No thanks. Over my decade here, I’ve seen so many permutations of this look, which right now is draped, deconstructed cobwebs of layers. The only person I know of who can pull off this look impeccably is Daphne Guinness; everyone else can take a seat and change it up. You’re in New York—why be so dreary?”

How his style has evolved throughout the past two decades: “My first ever notion of what style meant was watching Will Smith on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air when I was eight. I’d never seen anything like his outfits before, so I tried to emulate them. It didn’t go over that well. Since then, I’ve dressed [like a] skater, I’ve been prep, I’ve gone rave, I’ve saved up to buy from the bigger Italian designers in high school. Now, I try to invest in pieces that will last me a long time. I’d say that about half of what I wear, I’ve owned for years. I can understand, spot and respect trends, but I no longer give in to them. I’m not a victim of fast fashion. I like what I wear, and people seem to like it, too. You can be stylish without being a cartoon.”

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