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  • Photograph: Dennis Hopper

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    Andy Warhol
    A shock of white hair, dark glasses and black turtlenecks were key elements of the Pop Art pioneer's understated yet instantly recognizable image. "He loved life, art and people, and he knew how to bottle that," says admirer Lori Goldstein.

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    Diana Vreeland
    The former Vogue editor-in-chief and Met Costume Institute maven was a formidable fashion arbiter for more than 40 years. "She's divine! Individual, artistic, bohemian, daring, chic, classic and totally her own person," says Tziporah Salamon.

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    Edie Sedgwick
    The psychologically fragile Poor Little Rich Girl who became a Warhol "superstar," Sedgwick was the quintessential 1960s It girl. "Her fashion was almost dirty; she had this 'I don't give a shit' attitude," says Tess Pare-Mayer, while Becka Diamond loves her "silver hair, heavy eye makeup and minidresses."

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    Greta Garbo
    The aloof Hollywood star settled in Midtown East in the late '40s. "When I first moved to New York, I would often see her walking---always alone," idiosyncratic fashionista Jean says of her style icon. "We began what I thought was a silent acknowledgement, but what she probably considered a pain in the neck."

  • Photograph: Tom Palumbo

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    Miles Davis
    The jazz trumpeter who presided over the Birth of the Cool, Miles Davis was one hip cat. "Miles put his authentic fingerprint on everything," says Dana Leong, "whether it was the musical sounds he pioneered or his daring sense of fashion."

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    The Notorious B.I.G.
    Darlene Okpo singles out the rapper and Bed-Stuy native: "He had the Versace shades, Coogi sweater, denim jeans and fresh Timberland boots, and he was simply cool in it," she says.

  • Photograph: David Shankbone

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    Sarah Jessica Parker
    Style lines blur between chic Manhattanite Sarah Jessica Parker and her more sartorially daring Sex and the City character Carrie Bradshaw. "SJP and Carrie both perfectly represent my ideal New York style: fashionable yet quirky," says Gabi Gregg. "I love that Carrie unapologetically wears a tutu and heels during the day. No matter what she's got on, her confidence is truly what sells the outfit."

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    Iris and Carl Apfel
    A 2005 exhibition at the Met, "Rara Avis: Selections from the Iris Barrel Apfel Collection," brought the fabulous plumage of octogenarian Iris Apfel, cofounder of a textile company with her husband Carl, to the general public. "The Apfels are two of the most vivacious personalities in the worlds of fashion, textiles and spatial design," says Paul Tate dePoo. "Their refined personal style is both witty and wildly eccentric, reminding us that getting dressed can be its own creative process."

  • Photograph: Alexander Plyushchev

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    Yoko Ono
    According to Mia Moretti, the avant-garde artist's quirky headgear long predates her Lennon years. "It's hard to describe Yoko's style because it very natural and effortless," she says. "She's been wearing those hats since she was four, so they're part of her, like a third thumb."

  • Photograph: Piers Allardyce

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    Jerry Hall
    With her undulating blond mane and slinky disco frocks, the model and ex--Mrs. Jagger is closely associated with the Studio 54 era. "I've always loved Jerry Hall," says Lauren Beene. "There is this image of her in an old British Vogue wearing a turban, a printed bikini and an oversized caftan...the quintessential summer dream."

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    Jean-Michel Basquiat
    The Brooklyn-born artist frequently offset his trademark dreads with dapper tailoring. "He had the ability to take any piece of clothing and wear it in a way that reflected his personal style," says Yoni Goldberg.

Photograph: Dennis Hopper

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Andy Warhol
A shock of white hair, dark glasses and black turtlenecks were key elements of the Pop Art pioneer's understated yet instantly recognizable image. "He loved life, art and people, and he knew how to bottle that," says admirer Lori Goldstein.

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