Treat your feet

Give your barking dogs a break with these TONY-approved pampering services and take-home products.

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    Ahava Foot Indulgence gift set with Dead Sea bath crystals, mineral foot cream and terry-cloth warming socks, $30, at Lord & Taylor, 424 Fifth Ave between 38th and 39th Sts (212-391-3344)

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    Silver Linings odor-absorbing shoe liners, three pairs for $16, at Jim's Shoe Repair, 50 E 59th St between Madison and Park Aves (212-355-8259)

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    Foot Petals Killer Kushionz shoe inserts, $13, at C.O. Bigelow, 414 Sixth Ave between 8th and 9th Sts (212-533-2700)

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    Tweezerman Pedro Too callus stone, $20, at Sephora, locations throughout the city; visit sephora.com

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    Dr. Hauschka Rosemary leg and arm toner, $35, at Carnegie Hill Chemists, 1842 Second Ave between 95th and 96th Sts (212-987-5494)

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    Tweezerman Sole Mate dual-sided foot file, $20, at Sephora, locations throughout the city; visit sephora.com

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    Avon Foot Works Vanilla & Brown Sugar Moisturizing Foot Cream, $4, at avon.com

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    Foot Petals Sexy Soles customizable shoe inserts, $19, at Z Chemists, 40 W 57th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-956-6000, zchemists.com)

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    Deborah Lippmann Get Off callus softener, $38, at Barneys New York, 660 Madison Ave at 61st St (212-826-8900, barneys.com)

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    Gehwol Fusskraft Bamboo Scrub, $35, at Gita Gabriel Salon & Spa, 30 E 60th St between Madison and Park Aves, suite 505 (212-486-1539)

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    Amenity men's foot spray, $32, at mugonline.com

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    Merben Foot Butter, $12, at amazon.com

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Ahava Foot Indulgence gift set with Dead Sea bath crystals, mineral foot cream and terry-cloth warming socks, $30, at Lord & Taylor, 424 Fifth Ave between 38th and 39th Sts (212-391-3344)

The Energizer at Wellness Lounge
Instead of chugging that extra latte for a boost of gift-hunting energy, try this naturally stimulating treatment for your worn-out lower half. The session began with an hour-long reflexology rubdown in one of the Chinese-themed spa's dimly lit treatment rooms. After owner Yelena Kozlyansky stimulated acupuncture meridians in my feet with a deep and refreshing massage, I was led to a cushy chair for a detoxifying footbath. I sipped a cup of chamomile tea while my pups soaked in a warm mineral bath, where a fizzing energy-balancing machine sitting in the water created an electromagnetic current that supposedly stimulated my lymphatic system and drew out the toxins in my body through my feet. As if to dispel my suspicions, the water soon turned a murky brown to indicate the pollutants leaving my system. Whether the treatment was bogus or not, I left the spa feeling like I was walking on air rather than pounding the pavement. 133 Water St at Adams St, Dumbo, Brooklyn (718-875-1514, wellnessloungenyc.com). 80 minutes for $120 (normally $140). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Dec 30.—Laura Lanz-Frolio

Fruit Acid Pedicure at Cowshed Spa
From the moment you step inside the elevator that whisks you up to the Soho House's rustic-chic, third-floor spa, the calming scent of eucalyptus wafting from the steam room hits you. Indeed, relaxation will seem to seep into your very pores throughout the course of this sole-smoothing pedicure. Though the procedure is similar to your typical pedi, the experience is anything but. I realized this when I was offered a plush robe and led into a small private room concealed behind wood barn-style doors. Eschewing a pedicure station, my aesthetician attended to my tootsies as I sat on a comfy banquette lined with pillows, instructing me to soak my feet in a copper basin full of soapy warm water. After she meticulously filed and tidied up my nails, she rubbed SkinCeuticals' fruit acid peel on my soles, which tingled as it worked to remove a dead layer of skin. Next, she wrapped my feet in a peppermint-scented hot towel and slathered my skin from the knees down in an all-natural cream smelling of lemongrass. After applying two coats of Essie polish to the nails, the technician led me to the lavish, chandelier-bedecked relaxation room, where I could snack on apples, sip tea and read magazines while I waited a half hour for my nails to dry. Though lengthy, the treatment was effective in removing stubborn calluses off from my feet. Soho House New York, 29--35 Ninth Ave between 13th and 14th Sts, third floor (646-253 6111, sohohouseny.com). 90 minutes for $64 (normally $75). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Dec 30.—Cristina Velocci

High-heel Relief at Graceful Services
Who says your feet should have all of the fun? The reflexology-focused treatment at this second-floor walk-up will revive more than just your battered toes, as the technician triggers pressure points in your upper and lower legs and joints. After the practitioner stretched my quads as if I were preparing for a marathon, my shins and ankles got an equally thorough workout, leaving me feeling loose-limbed. Finally, the arches, heels and balls of my feet were kneaded like dough with copious amounts of oil, releasing the pain and discomfort that comes with wearing a fierce pair of five-inch platforms. Once my metatarsals regained consciousness—and I awoke from nodding off—I descended the stairs feeling victorious over my stilettos. 1095 Second Ave between 58th and 59th Sts, second floor (212-593-9904, gracefulservices.com). 60 minutes for $60 (normally $80). Bring a copy of this article to receive this discount through Jan 31.—Maria Bobila

Holiday Shopping Foot Relief at Metamorphosis Day Spa
Never mind that this treatment targets your lower extremities: This short but sweet half-hour massage-and-scrub combo leaves your entire body feeling relaxed. After entering one of the two hushed private rooms, I crawled onto the heated massage table before the technician covered my eyes with a soft, warm, lavender-scented eye mask. First she cradled my tired feet in steamy towels before giving my calves and soles a major rubdown with an oil-infused microscrub to slough off dead skin. Snuggled under the blanket on the table, I nearly dozed off as she slathered my peds with a pomegranate-cranberry lotion. At the halfway mark, I slipped my tootsies and calves into a tub of hot paraffin wax infused with ginger-spice oil to moisturize and soften dry skin. I walked away smelling like a holiday market and feeling refreshed, with feet that felt noticeably silkier. 127 E 56th St between Park and Lexington Aves, suite 5 (212-751-6051, metspa.com). 30 minutes for $60 (normally $90) Mention TONY to receive this discount through Dec 31.—Kim Anderson

Hot Stone Foot Massage at Lia Schorr New York Day Spa
After years of wearing the highest heels I could find, my feet are not in the best shape. So I was pumped to go to this unpretentious 30-year-old sanctuary to relieve my lower-leg tension. The technician immediately diagnosed my problem as fallen arches and recommended I start wearing gel shoe inserts. She then proceeded to oil my legs from the calves down and placed warm pebbles between my toes. Using the heated stones and her hands, she kneaded out any stress I'd inflicted on my extremities. After the treatment, I had a hard time getting motivated to stand up; my feet had reached a truly blissful state of comfort and relaxation. 686 Lexington Ave between 56th and 57th Sts, fourth floor (212-486-9670, liaschorr.com). 25 minutes for $35 (normally $50). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Jan 30.—Lauren Levinson

JellyBath Pedicure at Townhouse Spa
The slushy, gelatinous foot treatment at this tri-level midtown spa is like a middle-school science project gone terrifically right. The service started like any other pedicure, with a quick nail shape and buff, but when it came time to dip my toes into the bath, the water went from crystal-clear to a therapeutic goo that retained heat and got thicker as I swirled my feet around. A few minutes in the gunk—typically used as a toxin-sucking, swell-reducing physical-therapy treatment for aching muscles in the entire body—is also the perfect solution to revive stiletto-damaged feet. Next came a salt-scrub rub, a mud mask and two coats of Deborah Lippmann's shimmery lilac Whatever Lola Wants polish. In just an hour, I was on my way with a rejuvenated pair of smoothed soles. 39 W 56th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-245-8006, townhousespa.com). 60 minutes for $60 (normally $75). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Jan 31.—Rachel Raczka

Magic Clay Slipper at Jin Soon Natural Hand & Foot Spa
Zen is the first word that comes to mind upon entering this soothing East Village space: Japanese screens separate the pedi, mani and waxing areas, and charming details, such as the vintage school desks used for manicure stations, give the salon its unique flair. As I was escorted to my seat, I was offered the choice of green or citrus tea (I opted for the former). I then had to choose from five essential oils to add to the footbath; the scent of my choice of peppermint filled the air, intensifying the overall sense of serenity. After my nails were meticulously filed and shaped, it was time for the treatment. My aesthetician generously applied a honey-sugar exfoliating scrub with essential oils, put on textured terry-cloth gloves and rubbed it all over my feet and lower legs. Next, she smoothed on a softening mimosa-fig clay mask, which she explained provides deep moisture, stimulates microcirculation, and relieves tiredness and stress. After letting the mask set for ten minutes, she rinsed it off and gave me an amazingly thorough calf and foot massage. Finally, she expertly applied polish—Jin Soon carries an impressive roster of colors from brands like Essie, Nars, MAC, Zoya, Chanel and OPI. By the end of the hour, I was so relaxed that I was ready for a nap; my feet felt like new and were left feeling baby-soft and glowing. 56 E 4th St between Second and Third Aves (212-473-2047, jinsoon.com). 55 minutes for $50 (normally $55). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Dec 29.—Celia Shatzman

Reflexology at Relax Foot Spa
Upon arriving at this dimly lit street-level enclave, I was whisked into a small private room where my bare feet were dunked into a steamy concoction of hot water, salt and Chinese herbs. The reflexologist explained that the herbal medley promotes circulation as he treated me to a calming 20-minute shoulder massage. While I melted into the comfy reclining chair, he dried my feet and slathered my legs from knee to sole with a creamy cocoa butter. For the next 40 minutes, my calves and feet were prodded to their full tension-free glory as the technician applied pressure to 62 reflection points—a technique known for banishing stress and restoring the body's equilibrium. Now my feet are only aching for a trip back. 202 Hester St at Centre St (212-226-8288, relax-footspa.com). 60 minutes for $25 (normally $30). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Dec 31.—Leah Faye Cooper

Smooth Callus Buff at Wellness Men's Day Spa
Foot models and marathon runners alike can benefit from this restorative treatment, designed to eliminate buildup of hardened dead skin on the bottoms of your feet. Kick off the 40-minute affair by sipping a gratis beverage (wine, tea, juice) and soaking your dogs in a mint-infused bubble bath. A trained staffer peels off the thick top layer of skin with a tool that looks like a lemon zester, then gently applies a callus-removing cream and binds your feet in plastic wrap to soften them. Next: a vigorous buffing, followed by another soak and a cooling cucumber moisturizing scrub to finish. While not exactly relaxing, the process doesn't hurt one bit, and my feet came out looking and feeling as smooth as a baby's buttocks. Word to the wise, though: You'll need to return for about six treatments—once every two to four weeks—to see a long-term reduction in your callus development. 44 W 22nd St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-366-9080, wellnessmensdayspa.com). 40 minutes for $21 (normally $25). Mention TONY to receive this discount through Jan 31.—Chris Schonberger

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