Social sports leagues

Show off your game at these fun (often boozy) sporty clubs.

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Brewskee-Ball League at Full Circle Bar


The scene: Unsurprisingly, Skee-Ball players don't take themselves too seriously. "Skee-Ball loosens you up," says Andy Harmon, who met his girlfriend in the league. Three-person teams travel from every borough for the love of the sport—and the love of mixing it up on weeknights. "There are definitely some power couples in this league," says Joe Kanakaraj, who's single (for now). Full Circle Bar, 318 Grand St between Havemeyer St and Marcy Ave, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (347-725-4588, brewskeeball.com). Fall "skeeson" began Aug 8, but you can still register by e-mailing join@brewskeeball.com; $100 per player.
Percent single: 70%
Most common single type: Slightly goofy young professionals looking to hang out with other "indoor kids" in a low-pressure environment.
Ease of mingling: The hidden nuances of Skee-Ball (it's all about finesse) provide ample conversation fodder for both teammates and competitors, who often hit the bar together after games.

NYC Social Sports Club Kickball


The scene: Overseriousness is banned within this low-key league. Kickballers care about winning enough to challenge the ref's calls, but the score is quickly forgotten when they head to Aces and Eights (34 Ave A at 3rd St; 212-353-ACES, acesandeightsnyc.com) after the game to drink. "Sometimes we'll get a report from the bartenders like, 'What was in the air last night? It was make-out city,'" says Matt Archambault, the league's marketing manager. Games take place on outdoor courts on Norfolk St at Rivington St. Fall season begins Sept 28; register now at nycsocialsportsclub.com; $100 per player.
Percent single: 75%
Most common single type: Smiley, fit twentysomethings who thrive on the postcollegiate vibe (sports! booze! colorful T-shirts!) perpetuated by the league.
Ease of mingling: Singles who join as "free agents" will quickly bond with teammates, and opponents can let on-field flirtations play out at the bar.

Union Hall Bocce League


The scene: With teams like 99 Problems but a Bocce Ain't One and Chuck Bass's Ascot, this league is rife with laid-back wisecrackers who like to compete without actually breaking a sweat. No experience is necessary, and you can (and probably should) play with a beer in hand. "When you're done, you stick around for drinks. I've definitely met cool guys in the league," says Amy Esposito. , 702 Union St at Fifth Ave, Park Slope, Brooklyn (718-638-4400, unionhallny.com). Fall season begins late August. Visit bocce.unionhallny.com for exact start date and to register; $20 per player.
Percent single: 50%
Most common single type: Unpretentious, professional guys (ages 25 to 40) who come to play—and to meet a girl who knows her way around a bocce court.
Ease of mingling: Players take games seriously, but once the bocce balls roll to a stop, singles on opposing teams get down to business over shots at the bar.

Zog Sports Touch Football


The scene: Zog proudly boasts that 40 now-married couples met through the league, which organizes beer-pong- and flip-cup-fueled happy hours after every game. Teams are determined by skill level, and while participants come to win, they also come to meet like-minded athletic types. "It's a group of guys and girls, plus sports, plus alcohol. There's definitely the potential to meet someone," says player Mike Greene. Locations vary; visit zogsports.org for info. Fall season begins Sept 11; per player $135, per 15-person team $1,450.
Percent single: 75%
Most common single type: Fit guys and girls (ages 20 to 40) who aren't afraid to get sweaty (but still manage to look cute doing so).
Ease of mingling: Players keep their heads in the game while on the field, but during happy hour, they spit game of a different sort.

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