Apartment tour: 2BR in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Designer Whitney Pozgay's bohemian abode is a blend of vibrant colors, sentimental knickknacks and elements of nature.

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  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    Fashion designer Whitney Pozgay (whit-ny.com) has shared her railroad-style rental with her painter-cum-media-artist fianc, Parker Argote, for nearly four years, and she acknowledges that when it comes to decorating, "everything is a negotiation." The result: an eclectic mix of funky 1960s- and '70s-style furniture, artwork and heirlooms from the pair's family and friends, and curiosities picked up around the globe. The creative couple completely overhauled the space when they first moved in, turning the second bedroom into a giant walk-in closet with bright red walls, changing the light fixtures and rearranging kitchen appliances. "Everything was spray-painted; it was really ugly," says Pozgay, who tirelessly repainted to make their place look cleaner and feel like home.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    A multicolored Moroccan rag rug from Pozgay's favorite high-end home-accessories shop, John Derian Company (6 E 2nd St between Bowery and Second Ave; 212-677-3917, johnderian.com), functions as wall art above the couple's Craigslist-acquired couch. "It wasn't our most responsible purchase, but we needed some color in here," she admits. Pozgay garnishes the gray couch with a green pear pillow from Jonathan Adler (locations throughout the city; visit jonathanadler.com) and a blue-patterned one from Calypso St. Barth Home (407 Broome St between Crosby and Lafayette Sts; 212-925-6200, calypsostbarth.com).

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    "We've been collecting books forever and we're constantly getting new ones," says Pozgay, referring to the couple's Design Within Reach (locations throughout the city; visit dwr.com) contemporary bookcase piled high with architecture, science and vintage art tomes. The assortment continues in neat piles atop a war trunk that belonged to Argote's great-uncle, and which doubles as a storage unit and coffee table. She tops off the look with a yellow vase from the West 25th Street Market (W 25th St between Broadway and Sixth Ave, hellskitchenfleamarket.com).

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    Pozgay loves animal figurines like the ones featured in this collection of miniature elephants she inherited from her late grandmother. "We'll have a little menagerie eventually," she jokes of the herd of pachyderms, which are set beside little glass bottles filled with colored sand left over from the thank-you packages she sent following her debut fashion presentation.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    "When I was an intern at Kate Spade (katespade.com), I was in love with this couch," gushes Pozgay of the vivid orange-and-blue Mexican oilcloth chaise longue she salvaged from the designer's office before it ended up in the Dumpster. She added a muted Anthropologie (locations throughout the city; visit anthropologie.com) pillow to complete the look and hung a black-and-white photo of actress Jean Seberg, also acquired from the Kate Spade showroom.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    "We're on round three with this cactus garden situation," jokes Pozgay about her fianc's attempt at exercising his green thumb. To add some foliage to their kitchen, the couple picked up cacti at Sprout Home (44 Grand St between Kent and Wythe Aves, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-388-4440, sprouthome.com). The wood baby dresser, purchased at the Antiques Garage (112 W 25th St between Sixth and Seventh Aves; 212-243-5343, hellskitchenfleamarket.com), was originally pink until the couple repainted it white and repurposed it for their kitchen.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    The sentimental designer's refrigerator is crowded with pages torn from vintage home and garden magazines, artwork from friends and "a lot of funny, favorite photos I didn't want to put in a box," she says.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    Pozgay's friends indulge her penchant for interesting bric-a-brac by bringing her souvenirs from their travels, such as this Mexican Day of the Dead candelabra in her kitchen. "We love antiques and odd finds, but try to keep it as organized as possible," notes Pozgay.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    "I go for work [purposes] and end up coming back with apothecary bottles and glass birds," confesses Pozgay, who is a regular at the Brooklyn Flea (brooklynflea.com) and the Antiques Garage. She recently snatched up old glass flower vases that are temporarily functioning as centerpieces on her faux-antique wood dining table from Craigslist before putting them to use on her reception tables at her March wedding. Ever expanding her art collection, Pozgay obtained this horse print from one of her frequent flea-market trips.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    This silver bird wall sculpture is an "on-the-street trash-can find," admits Pozgay. "When I work at home, this becomes my desk," she says, motioning toward the tear sheets littering her kitchen table.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    Pozgay's abode is embellished with sundry decorative pieces, including these Patrick Swayze--signed ballet slippers used in Dirty Dancing, which her mother won at a school auction in Arizona. "I hate to get rid of things," she reveals.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    Pozgay opts for pale-blue bedroom walls that reflect the natural light and are accented by organic ornaments, such as antique deer antlers and a decorative wild-turkey-feather arrow from Partners & Spade (40 Great Jones St between Bowery and Lafayette St; 646-861-2827, partnersandspade.com). Her bed is surrounded by stacks of vintage fashion and home magazines that she's accumulated over the years.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    According to Pozgay, her apartment is a study in "keeping the best of both worlds." Her nature-loving fianc's hodgepodge of taxidermy insects, coral and seashells brought back from beach trips adorn their bedroom fireplace mantle, and surround one of Argote's own paintings, a still-life of lemons.

  • Photograph: Alex Stada

    The designer picked up ornithologically themed fabric from Swedish home-goods shop Just Scandinavian (161 Hudson St at Laight St; 212-334-2556, justscandinavian.com) and had a friend sew it into playful curtains that match a pair of ceramic cerulean birds her father gave her. The peacock statues perch on a wood nightstand that Argote picked up in college at an Austin antiques store, while the vintage bicycle was scored on Craigslist. "Only a couple of the gears work," notes Pozgay of her wheels, which she parks in the bedroom for lack of storage.

Photograph: Alex Stada

Fashion designer Whitney Pozgay (whit-ny.com) has shared her railroad-style rental with her painter-cum-media-artist fianc, Parker Argote, for nearly four years, and she acknowledges that when it comes to decorating, "everything is a negotiation." The result: an eclectic mix of funky 1960s- and '70s-style furniture, artwork and heirlooms from the pair's family and friends, and curiosities picked up around the globe. The creative couple completely overhauled the space when they first moved in, turning the second bedroom into a giant walk-in closet with bright red walls, changing the light fixtures and rearranging kitchen appliances. "Everything was spray-painted; it was really ugly," says Pozgay, who tirelessly repainted to make their place look cleaner and feel like home.

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Moon River Chattel (62 Grand St between Kent and Wythe Aves, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-388-1121, moonriverchattel.com)
Pozgay snagged her organic-cotton bedding at this simple, rustic housewares store.

The Evolution Store (120 Spring St between Greene and Mercer Sts; 212-343-1114, theevolutionstore.com)
"This is where we get our bugs, geodes and little oddities," says Pozgay of the natural-history collectables shop.

Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. (27 Vestry St at Hudson St; 212-226-6113, schoolhouseelectric.com)
Pozgay loves the midcentury light fixtures from this home-goods showroom that's open only to the trade. She and Argote changed up the lighting in their living room and kitchen to give them more of a period feel.

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