Live Photos: The Decemberists + Best Coast at Prospect Park

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best Coast

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists + Best Coast play at the Prospect Park Bandshell

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    The Decemberists

Photograph: Virginia Rollison

Best Coast

Fuzzy surf-pop band Best Coast and indie-rock poets the Decemberists played a sold-out Celebrate Brooklyn benefit at the Prospect Park Bandshell. Even Best Coast frontwoman Bethany Consentino's sun-dappled demeanor couldn't keep the rain away—but the steady downpour didn't seem to bother concertgoers, who danced beneath a sea of umbrellas. The Decemberists dedicated most of their set list to their latest album, the rustic The King Is Dead (read our review here), including "This Is Why We Fight" and "June Hymn." Thankfully, they also left time for older standouts such as "The Rake's Song" and "We Both Go Down Together." In between songs, Colin Meloy playfully interacted with his audience (read: led them in a synchronized hand dance), effectively making the huge crowd feel like an intimate gathering of friends.