June and Nancy

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Photograph: Letizia Mariotti

Dignity, grace, humor and a bit of upper torso are on display in Michelle Ramoni’s June and Nancy, a new drama that presents a naked look at the love that dared not speak its name in the era of Ozzie and Harriet. It’s the late 1950s, and dutiful young June (played by Ramoni) is married to solid, conventional Marty (Jeffrey Coyne), a successful architect. Once a dedicated painter, June now makes do volunteering at the local art gallery; but when she swaps her morning Chock full o'Nuts for a fifth of Jack, it's clear there's trouble a-brewin’. For one, June longs to paint again, but Marty is unsupportive—so when progressive, pants-wearing Nancy (Gabrielle Maisels) shows up at the gallery and awakens June's sense of self-worth, June is ripe to fall. An affair ensues, upending June's world. Kate Holland’s sensitive direction evokes grounded, brave performances from all four actors (including Peter Daniel Straus, a standout as June’s lovable friend); expressive paintings, such as Dalí’s The Persistence of Memory, projected from an upstage screen add a nice metaphorical touch to a production that also wins the award for Most Effective Use of a Futon. Though the play contains some predictable plot points and the writing occasionally hits a false note, June and Nancy is ultimately a touching portrait of intimacy and love. (Visit our Fringe Festival page for more reviews, and fringenyc.org for more information.)—Robin Rothstein

Event phone: 212-777-6088
Event website: http://horsetrade.info
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