Review: Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

Adam Rapp's new play mixes WASP manners and surreal shocks.

0

Comments

Add +
  • Photograph: Kevin Thomas Garcia

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling at Classic Stage Company

  • Photograph: Kevin Thomas Garcia

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling at Classic Stage Company

  • Photograph: Kevin Thomas Garcia

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling at Classic Stage Company

  • Photograph: Kevin Thomas Garcia

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

    Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling at Classic Stage Company

Photograph: Kevin Thomas Garcia

Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling

Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling at Classic Stage Company

Time Out Ratings :

<strong>Rating: </strong>3/5

Over his decade-plus career, the hyperlific (prolific? nah) Adam Rapp has dabbled in a broad range of genres and milieus. He's written country gothic, urban gothic, suburban absurd, bohemian noir, deadpan music-theater and even quirky historical epic (last year's The Hallway Trilogy). Where Rapp previously feared to tread, as far as I know, is a wealthy WASP family's dining room. Now, with Dreams of Flying Dreams of Falling, the dramatist bursts through the Edward Albee--A.R. Gurney class barrier to deliver a mannered fable about the porous border between savagery and civilization.

While Rapp's characters have traded up in terms of flatware, furnishings and intoxicant of choice (yum, Lafite), they remain the same tribe of soul-scarred, bile-spewing, borderline-violent sociopaths. Bossy, foul-mouthed matriarch Sandra Cabot (Christine Lahti) struts around and practically molests affable friend-of-the-family Dirk (Cotter Smith), but she's no more in control of the household than her emasculated husband, Bertram (Reed Birney), or their weirdo-savant daughter, Cora (Katherine Waterston). Clues and portents proliferate—Sandra draws Dirk into a murder plot, a lioness is said to prowl the basement, the sky turns Apocalypse Beige—but it's hard to see how these outr devices add up. Not that Rapp is one to let half-assed surrealism get in the way of bawdy fun, as when Cora and mentally disturbed boy-next-door James (Shane McRae) engage in loud, animalistic coitus on the dining-room table. (Quincy Tyler Bernstine, as a maid-cum-houseguest, looks on in amusing horror.) Dreams of Flying is too goofy and random to be too boring, but its facile and derivative demerits may tire both Rapp's fans and his detractors.

See more Theater reviews and follow David Cote on Twitter

Classic Stage Company. By Adam Rapp. Dir. Neil Pepe. With ensemble cast. 1hr 25mins. No intermission. See complete event information.

Users say

0 comments