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The Tony Awards

Follow our coverage for all the nominees, predictions of winners, interviews, reviews and news about Broadway's big night

There is no bigger night in New York theater than the annual Tony Awards, when the best on Broadway are recognized for their outstanding acting, brilliant musical numbers, stellar direction, writing and everything else that makes theatergoers the devoted fans they are. It's a thrill to revisit all the highs of the season, pore over the Tony nominees list and root for the productions and people that moved us the most. With this ultimate guide to the 2016 Tony Awards, you can revisit every stellar moment from the Broadway season, and get prepped to watch the awards broadcast in June 2016.

When are the Tony Awards?

The 70th Annual Tony Awards are in June 2016.

Where are the Tony Awards?

The Tony Awards are held at Radio City Music Hall and televised live on CBS.

How do I get tickets to the Tony Awards?

Tickets to the 70th Annual Tony Awards will go on sale in the spring on the Tony Awards website.

The 2015 Tony Awards

Theater

What are your picks for the top Tony Awards performances of all time?

We’ve made our list of the 25 best Tony Awards performances of the past 48 years, but Broadway lovers are a passionate bunch, and opinions about Tony Award history may differ. So now is your chance to reorder our 25 choices however you like. Have at it, show fans! RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage The Best Bars and Pubs in London

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The biggest surprises at the Tony Awards

As we noted before, this was one of the most unpredictable Tony Awards in recent memory (and yet, predict we did). It was an unusually strong season, full of diverse, exciting play and musicals brimful of stage veterans (Kristin Chenoweth, Chita Rivera, Michael Cerveris, Kelli O’Hara) and newcomers to the Great White Way (Alex Sharp, Steven Boyer, Sydney Lucas). We found ourselves uncommonly divided in terms of who we hoped would win or believed should win (witness the epic battle of the blogs between Adam Feldman’s lobbying for Kristin and my plea for Team Kelli). But the speeches haven been spoken and the tears have dried. What upsets upset us most?In the acting categories, the night started out with unexpected wins: Richard McCabe for supporting actor in a play (The Audience) and Christian Borle for supporting actor in a musical (Something Rotten). Mind you, both are totally deserving, it’s just that we predicted Nathaniel Parker and Brad Oscar, respectively. Then Helen Mirren won for leading actress in a play for The Audience and Annaleigh Ashford for supporting actress in You Can’t Take It With You, and our clairvoyant powers were restored. Same goes for Alex Sharp’s impressive turn in Curious Incident (even though we rooted equally for Hand to God’s brilliant Steven Boyer).An American in Paris did not sweep. It started with director Sam Gold’s win for Fun Home, and continued with Michael Cerveris for best actor in a musical, also for Fun Home. Director Christopher Wheel

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Theater

Kristin Chenoweth talks the Tony Awards, Glee and life as a perfectionist

Kristin Chenoweth is a 4'11" soprano who’s Broadway to the core, with full-on opera training and major acting and dancing chops—the Oklahoma native originated the role of Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked and is up for a Tony this year for her portrayal of an overconfident actor in the screwball comedy On the Twentieth Century. (Those who aren’t Broadway aficionados will recognize her from her roles on Glee and Pushing Daisies or the gobs of other parts in her 18-year theater, TV and film career.) Before she and Alan Cumming tackle the Great White Way’s biggest night on Sunday 7, Chenoweth, 46, reveals that there may be a trembling nerve or two under that gregarious demeanor.How are you feeling about hosting?Well, I’m scared. But that’s why I do things. If you live life without taking risk, you will never know success.You’re following in some famous footsteps, like your good pal Sean Hayes, who hosted in 2010. Did he offer any tips?“You’re gonna get critiqued anyway. So just fuck it, have fun.” I love Sean in such a way. The heart is ginormous and the talent is ginormous. Me and Alan—we’re not really what you’d call vanilla. So we’re gonna go with that. I like vanilla, but I’m more of a chocolate-strawberry-pecan praline–type girl.Have you seen many of this year’s nominated plays?No, because we’re all on the same schedule! I saw The Elephant Man. I was beside myself—I was so emotional. I was very drawn to Patricia Clarkson. And I want to see Kelli [O’Hara] in The King and I.Spe

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The races to watch at the 2015 Tony Awards on Sunday

As the Broadway world pants its way toward toward the seasonal finish line of the Tony Awards on Sunday night, it’s clear that a lot of photo finishes are in store. Among longtime Tony obsessives observers, there is a feeling that the 2015 race is the hardest to call in recent memory; there are no clear frontrunners in multiple categories. Knuckles will be whitened, nails will be bitten, and fingers will be flying across smart-phone keyboards as we live-tweet our reactions on the Time Out New York Twitter account. We’ve already published our full predictions, but here is a quick final guide to the (non-design) races in terms of sheer suspense. LOCKS:These are the ones you can bet your children’s lives on.Best Play: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Simon StephensBest Actress in a Play: Helen Mirren, The AudienceBest Book: Lisa Kron, Fun HomeBest Score: Jeanine Tesori, Fun HomeBest Choreography: Christopher Wheeldon, An American in ParisBest Orchestrations: Christopher Austin, Don Sebesky and Bill Elliott, An American in Paris NEAR LOCKS:If any of these lose, it will be considered a major upset.Best Revival of a Musical: The King and I.Best Actor in a Play: Alex Sharp, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.Best Featured Actress in a Play: Annaleigh Ashford, You Can’t Take It With You.Best Director of a Play: Marianne Elliott, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time LIKELY WIN:You guessed it: This is likely.Best Revival of a Play: S

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Theater

The 5 best bars for watching the Tony Awards

It’s fun to watch the Tony Awards, and it’s even more fun to watch them while drinking. For those staying home, we’ve created the ultimate (by which we mean life-threatening) Tony Awards drinking game, but for people who want to see the show while out on the town, these are the five most fun joints at which to catch the action. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Theater

Play Time Out New York’s Tony Awards Drinking Game: everybody wins!

Okay, after some internal struggle, you have accepted that Broadway is big enough to accommodate both An American in Paris and Something Rotten! You've alienated workplace colleagues with incessant talk of how British director Stephen Daldry should be nominated for The Audience as well as Skylight. You’ve had sleepless debating if the gold should go to Kelli or Kristin. And for your weekly spin class you use a shuffle mix of On the Town, Fun Home and On the Twentieth Century. You’ve invited all your Tony-obsessed friends to see the broadcast, regularly checking the Time Out New York Twitter feed for witty observations. What's left but to drink? Following are rules for getting royally sloshed on Tony night, which is one guaranteed way of enjoying it. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage  Round one (8pm-9pm): • Take a polite drink every time there's a celebrity presenter who was on Broadway this year but was not nominated for a Tony but is gamely presenting anyhow because they want to show they're not bitter about not having been nominated.  • Suck bitchily on your white-wine spritzer every time someone gets pitchy. • Two sips for every double entendre.  Round two (9pm-10pm): • Each time co-hosts Kristin or Alan make a joke about Wolf Hall’s length, down a hearty draught of ale. • When Hand to God sock puppet Tyrone is bleeped out for profanity, chug. • For each joke about dysfunctional families (Fun Home, Hand to God, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the

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Theater

2015 Tony Awards predictions

Most years we share our Tony Awards predictions with the caveat that we’re not all-knowing beings of infallible insight (sorry to disabuse you), and some races are too close to call—or we’ve heard contradictory buzz on the Rialto. Some Broadway seasons are so weak that it’s hard to guess which of the sorta deserving will sorta win. But this year, it really is true. There are a number of strong contenders for Best Play and Best Musical, and the acting categories are stuffed with formidable opponents. Will Fun Home beat An American in Paris? It’s possible. Will Steven Boyer win over Alex Sharp? Yes! No! Help! Lightning round: Kristin or Kelli? We simply don’t know. But we can pretend to know. Read on! RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Theater

The 25 best Tony Awards performances

The Tony Awards are not just a celebration of excellence in Broadway theater, but also a national showcase and public record of performances that are otherwise local and fleeting. The most memorable Tony moments can echo in theater history for years or decades to come. But which are the best of the best? We've surveyed every performance of a nominated musical or musical revival since CBS's first Tony telecast (in 1967), and here's our list of the top 25. Note that we're limiting ourselves to Tony-nominated shows in the years they were nominated; don't look here for special material, musical guests, opening medleys and the like. So without further ado—and steeling yourself for the possibility that some of your favorites didn't make the cut—prepare to be razzle-dazzled by the greatest of the Great White Way. Curtain up! RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Give the Tony Award to the most deserving: Kelli O’Hara

Two days ago my esteemed colleague Adam Feldman uttered a cri de coeur rallying Tony voters to support Kristin Chenoweth, dammit, because she is so amazing in On the Twentieth Century and it is a crime—a crime—that she has never gotten a Tony Award for Leading Actress in a Musical. He made a strong argument.But I disagree. I believe Kelli O’Hara deserves to win the Tony for her immaculately poised and richly modulated performance as Anna in Lincoln Center Theater’s revival of The King and I. Weighing all the elements—vocal brilliance, acting subtlety, conception of role, support of artistic vision and that X factor of a star challenging herself—I find myself more impressed by O’Hara’s achievement than Chenoweth’s admittedly delightful turn.Of course, like all talent contests at this high a level, the race is inherently silly, comparing apples and oranges—or perhaps, apples of equally complex savor. Chenoweth is in terrific voice, she’s funny as all get-out, and Lily Garland is precisely the kind of role she can do with both hands tied behind her back. What’s more, Chenoweth is clearly, on some intangible level, channeling the wonderful Madeline Kahn—who originated the role in 1978. What’s not to like?And yet O’Hara is giving a smart, deeply felt performance that is by turns radiant and restrained (when it needs to be), centered and nuanced, humor mingled with melancholy. She is the anchor in a production that revisits a Broadway classic that, in 64 years since it opened, has

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Give Kristin Chenoweth the Tony Award she deserves

The Tony Awards will be broadcast on CBS on June 7, and as is often the case in Broadway-loving circles, much of the talk this year is about the race for Best Actress in a Musical. We are blessed in 2015 with multiple strong contenders—perhaps the strongest field since 2004. But one nominee, despite her small physical stature, stands head and shoulders above the rest. That nominee is Kristin Chenoweth for On the Twentieth Century, and if she doesn’t win, it will be a crime against musical theater. To me, Chenoweth is not just the right choice; she is the obviously right choice. This is a relevant distinction, because a lot of people seem to be overlooking the obvious. Conventional wisdom this season has held that the Best Actress race would come down to Chenoweth and Kelli O’Hara, for The King and I; lately, there has also been a surge of support for Chita Rivera, for The Visit. Both of those women are giving very good performances, but Chenoweth is giving a legendary one. Rivera, of course, is already an icon. Her turn in The Visit draws from that reputation; at 82, she has only to appear onstage, looking regal and sly, and the audience colors her in with nearly 60 years of Broadway history. But she doesn’t have all that much else to do in The Visit, an evocative but slender musical parable, and Best Actress should not be an award for lifetime achievement. (I would be happy to see Rivera get one of those; she could put it next to her other two Tonys, and her medal from the

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2015 Tony Award nominated shows currently on Broadway

Theater

An American in Paris

The arrival of two big musicals derived from classic 1950s movies located in the City of Light (see Gigi) indicates either a resurgent interest in the early film oeuvre of Leslie Caron or a lack of producer imagination.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Based on the 2003 best-seller about an autistic teen’s search for the killer of his neighbor’s pooch, this stage thriller comes to Broadway on a wave of acclaim from England. The adaptation is by the prolific Simon Stephens, and the spectacular staging is by Marianne Elliott (War Horse).

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Fun Home

It’s her job to fit stories into boxes. But her own life story resists easy lines. Lisa Kron and Jeanine Tesori’s Fun Home, based on Bechdel’s graphic memoir, gracefully and movingly contrasts two narratives. One is about Alison (played as an adult by Beth Malone, as a college student by Emily Skeggs and as a child by Sydney Lucas) and her nervous, joyous self-discovery as a lesbian.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Hand to God

Praise be to the angels behind it: Hand to God has made it to Broadway. No need for heavenly choir music, though, because the reception the play deserves is the one it gets nightly at the Booth: roars of gleeful laughter.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The King and I

The King and I arrives this spring much like the ship Chow Phya heaves into view of Bangkok on the Vivian Beaumont stage: a majestic vessel of excellent construction, expertly piloted and bringing with it many wonderful things—starting with Kelli O'Hara. 

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

On the Town

The 1944 Broadway classic about sailors on shore leave in New York returns to remind us that it's a "helluva town." The Leonard Bernstein score and Comden and Green lyrics are handled by a charming cast directed by John Rando. For lovers of the score, music to your ears: the orchestra will number 28.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Something Rotten!

Do you still, to this day, fondly remember that 1986 Taming of the Shrew episode of Moonlighting? Whenever blue, do you stream Shakespeare in Love or Blackadder II? Elizabethan fops and wenches forming a stagewide kick line cause a little flutter under the ruff? If you said “yes” to two or more, then hie thee posthaste to the St. James Theatre, where Something Rotten! has established itself as Broadway’s funniest, splashiest, slap-happiest musical comedy in at least 400 years.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Past Tony coverage

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Broadway watch: post-Tony nomination massacres

It’s a grim annual ritual: Tony Award nominations come out and snubbed shows start dropping like flies. Yesterday it was Living on Love, the Renée Fleming vehicle that received less than loving responses, struggled at the box office, and then gave up after garnering zero nods. Living on Love goes cold this Sunday.The Heidi Chronicles opted for pre-emptive action: After failing to draw audiences to this Wendy Wasserstein revival—despite casting Mad Men star Elisabeth Moss—producers announced a premature end last week. It also shutters after Sunday’s matinee.So who’s next? All eyes are on Doctor Zhivago, which got some of the nastiest notices of the season (including this pan from yours truly). The show looks expensive to keep going on what must be terrible word of mouth, and it too was completely ignored by Tony nominators. Last week the box office take was $485K—probably shy of the behemoth’s weekly “nut” (the basic cost of running it). But with 50 producers (is that a record?) there might be cash sloshing around to burn. But how long?Hand to God (five nominations) and It Shoulda Been You (zero nominations) each filled 73% of the house last week. The Visit was at 72% capacity. Each is praying to do better business in coming months, either from June Tony wins or an uptick in word of mouth.Otherwise, most of the nominated shows are doing well at the box office: The King and I, Something Rotten!, An American in Paris and Fun Home are playing to full or near-full capacity. Wolf H

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Theater

Exclusive: The 2015 TONY* nominees have been announced!

Call it a chronic case of premature appreciation. The official Tony Awards nominations will be announced on Tuesday, April 28. But Tony fever has us shaking and shivering. So here’s our annual trick—er, tradition: the TONY* (*Time Out New York) nominations! Below are the 2015 Tony nominees as we—Theater editor David Cote and associate Theater editor Adam Feldman—would choose them: not our predictions of who will be nominated, but the Broadway shows and artists that we think should be nominated by the actual Tony Nominating Committee. Making up our minds wasn’t easy, especially after the insane crush of shows in the past three weeks—many of them quite good. (To other contenders, we were a cold Siberian winter.) Enjoy the list, and tell us how wrong we are in the comments section below. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Theater

The 5 best bars for watching the Tony Awards

By Ben Rimalower It’s fun to watch the Tony Awards, and it’s even more fun to watch them while drinking. For those staying home, we’ve created the ultimate (by which we mean life-threatening) Tony Awards drinking game, but for people who want to see the show while out on the town, these are the five most fun joints at which to catch the action. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Theater

Five theater clichés the Tony Awards just can't resist

The familiar is always comforting—especially, it seems, to the members of the Tony nominating committee. There are certain hoary theater conventions they love to reward, if not with actual statuettes then at least with nominations. Here are five of the most egregious. The big black girl with a big voice who belts out a big number Tony doesn’t reward all of these characters—there are just too darn many of them! This season alone, there were four new ones: Capathia Jenkins in Newsies, Kecia Lewis-Evans in Leap of Faith, Liz Mikel in Lysistrata Jones and Da'Vine Joy Randolph in Ghost, who snagged a Tony nod for being the only bright spot in a deadly show. It’s true that some excellent character actors working on Broadway today fit this archetype (see Tony Award winner Lillias White), but just once we’d like to see a thin Asian girl get a chance to bring down the house. 

Actors who provide their own accompaniment Perhaps this is less a cliché than a trend that started when director John Doyle earned accolades and Tony Awards for his mountings of Sweeney Todd and Company (and next, possibly, Merrily We Roll Along). True, the cast of Once pulls impressive quadruple duty acting, singing, dancing and playing various instruments. But while leads Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti deserved recognition, we had to consult our Playbills to remember Best Featured Actress nominee Elizabeth A. Davis. And even then, we’re not sure what’s so great about her beyond the fact that she really know

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Theater

Ten Tony Blunders

Theater devotees know that the only thing more entertaining than predicting the Tonys is second-guessing them. So without further delay, here is our guide to the worst Tony decisions in each of the past ten years.

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Theater

Tony clip of the day

As the Tony Awards loom on the horizon, what's an obsessive to do? Dig into the past, of course, to relive some of the most memorable moments from past telecasts. We've already compiled a list of the top 25 performances by Best Musical nominees over the years—the Tonys' greatest hits. Now we turn our attention to the B-sides and rarities: a new video each day, all celebrating the quirkier side of the Tonys—the good, the bad and the campy. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Tony Awards 2014! Winners and losers

Another year, another Tony Awards telecast. In general, the gold went to the most deserving of the season: Few would carp about Bryan Cranston or Neil Patrick Harris" href="http://www.timeout.com/newyork/theater/neil-patrick-harris-interview-you-might-as-well-own-the-spotlight" target="_blank">Neil Patrick Harris nabbing top honors, and relative newcomers (Sophie Okenedo and Lena Hall) were recognized too. 

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2014 Tony Award predictions

As we noted five weeks ago, when the 2014 Tony Award nominations were announced, some of the races were made less interesting than they could have been. 

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