An egg that takes photos, and more amazing pinhole cameras

To mark Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day on Sunday 28, we found innovators that have turned eggs, mouths, aircraft hangars and trees into cameras.

0

Comments

Add +


The 13th annual volunteer-organized Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day takes place this weekend on Sunday, April 28. It's a simple, fun premise: People from all over the world take, upload and share pinhole photographs via pinholeday.org.

A pinhole camera is just a lensless camera, basically consisting of a sealed, black box; film or photographic paper; and a tiny hole with a shutter to let the light in. One of the joys of this medium is that it's not beyond anyone to make a DIY version—even we were able to do it (check out how to build a pinhole camera, including shooting tips from the CEO of Lomography USA)—and conversely, there's huge scope for experimentation. Some enthusiasts have been incredibly innovative, and we've gathered a few of the favorites that we found in the slide show below.

If you're interested in trying it out, there are a few events to join in New York, including Lomography’s Pinhole Picnic, which includes a bus trip to New Jersey’s Van Saun County Park plus a rental camera and film, or a pinhole workshop at 19th-century photographer Alice Austen’s family home. B&H Photo Video is also hosting a midtown workshop and photo walk (meet at B&H event space, 420 Ninth Ave at 34th St, second floor; 800-688-9421, bhphotovideo.com; Apr 28 noon–3pm, free, registration required).

  • Photograph: Francesco Capponi

    Italian photographer Francesco Capponi (francescocapponi.it) has made an incredible variety of pinhole cameras using—among other things—a pine nut, a birdhouse, a top hat and (shown here) an egg. Keep clicking for the results from this experiment and see the olive tree he turned into a picture-taking machine.

    See more photos on his Flickr profile, flickr.com/photos/dippold.

  • Photograph: Francesco Capponi

    Photos taken by an egg pinhole camera.

  • Photograph: Francesco Capponi

    The tree pinhole camera

  • Photograph: Francesco Capponi

    Photos taken with the tree pinhole camera

  • Photograph: Justin Quinnell

    Justin Quinnell has pioneered a technique that turns a mouth into a pinhole camera. The camera sits in the mouth, and light is let in by parting your lips. To be honest, we're not entirely sure of the mechanics (how do you get it in and out of your mouth without overexposing the film?), which is why we'll be attending his "Make a SmileyCam" workshop at Lomography in the West Village on May 19 at 1pm ($10, students $7). E-mail shopnyc@lomography.com to reserve a spot.

  • Photograph: Justin Quinnell

    Justin Quinnell's pinhole SmileyCam. Find out more at pinholephotography.org.

  • Photograph: Rob Johnson

    The Legacy Project (legacyphotoproject.com), now a nonprofit that offers photography workshops, created the world's largest camera out of a jet hangar, which yielded the world's largest photograph. Here, you can see the developed photograph displayed in the hangar.

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    Tucson, AZ, photographer Wayne Martin Belger (boyofblue.com) brings a fascinating concept to bear on his work. He creates handmade pinhole cameras (works of art in themselves) with materials that relate to his subject. For instance, he has used skulls in two projects: The Third Eye Camera, pictured, was used to study the beauty of decay (read more at boyofblue.com).

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    San Francisco, taken with the Third Eye camera.

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    Belger has also created Yama, pictured, a stereo camera (letting light in through the two eye sockets) from a 500-year-old Tibetan skull to examine modern incarnations of deities and the Tibetan exodus (read more at boyofblue.com). Watch a video interview with the artist on the Arizona Public Media website (azpm.org).

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    Yama

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    Yama

  • Photograph: Wayne Martin Belger

    Margaret Bourgeoys, taken with the Yama camera.

Photograph: Francesco Capponi

Italian photographer Francesco Capponi (francescocapponi.it) has made an incredible variety of pinhole cameras using—among other things—a pine nut, a birdhouse, a top hat and (shown here) an egg. Keep clicking for the results from this experiment and see the olive tree he turned into a picture-taking machine.

See more photos on his Flickr profile, flickr.com/photos/dippold.


Users say

1 comments