See how Queens’ abandoned railway might be transformed

No, it’s not the High Line’s second coming, but these renderings do look a lot like Manhattan’s elevated park

0

Comments

Add +
Make It! Grow It! by Song Deng and René Biberstein of Toronto, Canada

Make It! Grow It! by Song Deng and René Biberstein of Toronto, Canada Rendering courtesy the American Institute of Architects

What would you do with a forgotten stretch of railroad track? A group of innovative designers has been considering the question for QueensWay Connection: Elevating the Public Realm, a competition organized by the Emerging New York Architects (ENYA) committee of the AIA New York Chapter. Challenged to redesign an elevated viaduct that stretches over 3.5 miles on an abandoned railway across Queens, over 100 architects submitted ideas.


Above, see the third-prize–winning design, and you can scroll down for more renderings, including the ENYA victor at the bottom. While the five finalists’ submissions are beyond cool, the plans won’t be put into action just yet; the viaduct is currently being considered for a green conversion. Whether or not that's feasible, you can see the proposals up close at an unveiling exhibition on July 17 at the AIA Center for Architecture.


The track line, known as the QueensWay, is a former branch of the LIRR and has been deserted for about half a century. But with the QueensWay Park, a bicycle and pedestrian walkway could connect communities across the borough. Could this be the High Line’s newest competitor? Most definitely. A park would not only physically transform the neglected space itself, but also transform residents' methods of transportation.


From a rooftop garden to a sprawling staircase, the sketches call for some pretty grandiose construction. It’s unlikely any of these specific ideas will actually be executed, but a city can dream, right?


Queens Billboard by Nikolay Martynov of Basel, Switzerland

Queens Billboard by Nikolay Martynov of Basel, Switzerland Rendering courtesy the American Institute of Architects

Ebb & Flow by Jessica Shoemaker of Albuquerque, New Mexico

Ebb & Flow by Jessica Shoemaker of Albuquerque, New Mexico Rendering courtesy the American Institute of Architects

Upside Down Bridge by Hyuntek Yoon of Queens, New York

Upside Down Bridge by Hyuntek Yoon of Queens, New York Rendering courtesy the American Institute of Architects


The Queensway Steps by Carrie Wibert of Paris, France
Rendering courtesy the American Institute of Architects


Users say

0 comments

Send tips and cat photos to:

Editor: Marley Lynch (@marleyasinbob)

marley.lynch@timeout.com

Time Out videos



Subscribe to Time Out New York on Spotify for playlists and recommendations from our Music team.

Check out New York's best restaurants, hottest street style, cool apartments and more.