Dinner and a movie: Venus in Fur; Jersey Boys; Norte, the End of History

We've got your date night planned, with three perfect dinner-and-a-movie pairings

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  • 1. Venus in Fur + Play

    The film
    Roman Polanski serves up a twisted good time with this S&M-tinged showdown between a fussy director and a smarter-than-she-seems actor. The subtext here is power; fans of the director's early classics—Knife in the Water, Repulsion and Rosemary's Baby—will notice echoes of the same dirty dynamic. At age 80, Polanski's still got it.

    The food
    See the film at IFC, then take a 20-minute stroll uptown and follow up the psychosexual drama at—where else?—the Museum of Sex, at their ground-floor café-bar-lounge, Play. Titillating plates include burrata dusted with rose-petal powder, green-tomato tempura with a tomate de árbol emulsion, and drunken mussels with achiote-herb crème on toast—wash 'em down with a naughty tipple (or three) like the Loose Women & Pickpockets, a confit-washed cognac number with orange cordial.

  • 2. Jersey Boys + Carbone

    The film
    We've got some quibbles with the much-anticipated film version of the 2006 jukebox musical (mainly related to director Clint Eastwood being out of his depth). But there's no denying the tunefulness of the Four Seasons, nor the singing chops of Frankie Valli portrayer John Lloyd Young, a Broadway star whom Hollywood was wise to retain.

    The food
    After seeing the movie at the AMC Loews on 19th St, you're going to want some Italian food. Frankie Valli's hallmark falsetto frequently serves as soundtrack to the midcentury Italian feasts at nearby Carbone, that big-ticket Village red-saucer from Torrisi power trio Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi and Jeff Zalaznick. Round up the band to share the decadent rigatoni alla vodka, drenched in cream and melted onion, the hulking caramelized cherry ribs or that hyped-but-deserved veal Parmesan, worth every penny of its $50 price tag.

  • 3. Norte, the End of History + Jeepney

    The film
    Settle in for Lav Diaz’s generous feast of a Filipino drama—four hours of social injustice, class resentment and tricky domestic tensions. Novelistic is a term that gets thrown around a lot these days, but Diaz’s film more than earns the adjective; you’d be hard-pressed to find another movie that approaches a marathon-length running time yet still makes you wish it were twice as long.

    The food 
    Make the very worthwhile trek from Lincoln Center down to the East Village for some killer Filipino at Jeepney, the ramshackle, centerfold-papered cousin to Maharlika. Park yourself beneath posters of Filipina babes and Jesus murals—seriously—for funkified Southeast Asian eats like banana-ketchup-glazed chicken wings, pig-ear tacos with avocado cream and—if you really want to prove your adventurousness to your date—the Balut, a hard-boiled duck egg with a slurp-ready fertilized duck embryo encased inside.

1. Venus in Fur + Play

The film
Roman Polanski serves up a twisted good time with this S&M-tinged showdown between a fussy director and a smarter-than-she-seems actor. The subtext here is power; fans of the director's early classics—Knife in the Water, Repulsion and Rosemary's Baby—will notice echoes of the same dirty dynamic. At age 80, Polanski's still got it.

The food
See the film at IFC, then take a 20-minute stroll uptown and follow up the psychosexual drama at—where else?—the Museum of Sex, at their ground-floor café-bar-lounge, Play. Titillating plates include burrata dusted with rose-petal powder, green-tomato tempura with a tomate de árbol emulsion, and drunken mussels with achiote-herb crème on toast—wash 'em down with a naughty tipple (or three) like the Loose Women & Pickpockets, a confit-washed cognac number with orange cordial.


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