Greenpoint, Brooklyn: New developments and the best things to do

The influx of young residents in Greenpoint is changing the demographics of that neighborhood. Find out more and see our picks for the best Greenpoint spots.

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  • Photograph: Noah Devereaux

    WNYC Transmitter Park

  • Photograph: Noah Devereaux

    WNYC Transmitter Park

  • Photograph: Noah Devereaux

    WNYC Transmitter Park

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Anise Anephew at Paulie Gee's

  • WORD

  • WORD

Photograph: Noah Devereaux

WNYC Transmitter Park

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Williamsburg’s northern neighbor has been quietly undergoing a transformation of its own in the past decade. Its cachet rose even further this year, thanks to the debut of spaces such as WNYC Transmitter Park, which opened in August, not to mention Greenpoint’s use as the setting of HBO’s much-discussed Girls. Young, wealthy residents are moving into the neighborhood in droves: According to 2010 census data, the population of 30-year-olds in the area has doubled since 2000. But this has led to tensions between old and new denizens. One example: The so-called brunch wars from earlier this summer, in which eateries butted heads with Community Board 1 over the issue of outdoor seating before noon on Sundays.


The population jump has also put a strain on the G train, the neighborhood’s sole subway line. “The G is kind of the little stepsister of the other MTA trains,” observes state committeeman Lincoln Restler, who was a major advocate for the permanent G train extension to Park Slope. “It only has four cars, and even during rush hour it only comes every eight minutes.” As younger residents move in, the area’s older, chiefly Polish population may find itself pushed out. “My deli was aimed at the Polish community, and there are not enough of them to sustain my business,” says Mieszko Kalita, who will close his storefront on Manhattan Avenue next month. “I’ve been here for 24 years, and clearly, it’s time to give it to the new people. The neighborhood’s core is changing.”


Where to go

WNYC Transmitter Park

WNYC Transmitter Park

The waterfront area that once held WNYC’s AM transmitter towers is now a 1.6-acre green space. The park features a small pier, lush lawns and a stellar view of the Manhattan skyline. • nyc.gov/parks

  1. West St between Greenpoint Ave and Kent St

Paulie Gee's

Pizza hobbyist turned pro Paul Giannone produces truly original creations. Among our favorites is the Daniela Spinachi, which combines shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano, sliced fresh garlic, baby spinach and milky fior di latte. • 347-987-3747, pauliegee.com

  1. 60 Greenpoint Ave, (between Franklin and West Sts)
More info

Old Hollywood

Though this boutique carries duds for guys and gals, it’s best known for its eclectic jewelry selection, curated by owner Tiffany Porter. You can find such treasures as dainty embroidered monogram lockets ($88) and brass monocles ($38). • 718-389-0837, oldhollywoodmoxie.com

  1. 99 Franklin St , (between Greenpoint Ave and Milton St)
More info

WORD

This independent bookstore carries classics by authors such as Henry Miller, as well as contemporary titles. Try to time your visit to one of the spot’s quirky weekly literary events.
718-383-0096, wordbrooklyn.com

  1. 126 Franklin St, (at Milton St)
More info

The Diamond

Low-alcohol brews dominate at this bar, which devotes an entire section of its menu to session beers (owner Dave Pollack ensures that they’re all under 4.5 percent alcohol by volume, though 5 percent is a common standard). Throw one back while challenging your friends to a match on the bar’s shuffleboard table. • 718-383-5030, thediamondbrooklyn.com

  1. 43 Franklin St, (between Calyer and Quay Sts)
More info

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