Here’s what you’ll see if you take a Great Saunter through the heart of the city

Inspired by the weekend’s grand walk around NYC, we took a trip straight down the middle

0

Comments

Add +

Photographs: Sarah Mulligan


After seeing photos of the Great Saunter on Saturday, I thought to myself, Yeah, that's great and all…strolling around the edge of Manhattan, seeing the outer boroughs and that "sixth borough," New Jersey, from a distance. But what if I wanted to stretch my legs, cut that walk in half and see the heart of the city?

Follow my lead and walk the length of Broadway in Manhattan.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Starting from 230th Street in Manhattan (right on the border of the Bronx), me and my merry band of Manhattan ramblers traveled all the way down Broadway to the very bottom, ending at Battery Park. I chronicled my adventures along the way via Instagram with the hashtag #AllBroadwayOrBust, which could easily be changed to #AllBroadwayOrBus if we failed and used public transport the rest of the way.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    225th. A feather attached to the claw, foot or at least some bloody part of what once was a whole pigeon at some time. As our feet are a main part of this journey, is this an ominous omen for one of our travelers? Or just an unfortunate mishap from the 1 train barreling up above?

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Did you know that part of the Bronx is technically the borough of Manhattan? The Marble Hill section that the Broadway Bridge connects Inwood to is actually still part of Manhattan.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    204th. The Dyckman Farmhouse, a preserved oasis of old Dutch New York. It was here that one member of our caravan informed us that tulips are edible, and ate one of the Dyckman garden's tulips. I feared the omen from 225th Street would come true after all.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Dongan Place, Fort Tryon Park. Blossoms in full bloom.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Brick balconies adorned apartments along Broadway at 190th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    175th. The United Palace Theatre: gorgeous architecturally on the outside, even lovelier on the inside. A theater dipped in gold.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Precocious peering on 151st.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    A bit of San Fran hillside loveliness on 147th. The third-floor veranda on the gray house midway down the block stopped me in my tracks.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    143(rd) dominos.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    I was asked today if I found any good restaurants to try during the walk. I hardly paid attention to what food there was, but the decaying signs and hand-painted type of yesteryear always caught my eye, especially this one on Tiemann Place.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    114th. Broadway in the lower teens becomes Columbia territory, or J.Crew town.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    113th. Dogs can't eat chocolate. Stop looking at it, boy.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    107th. A staredown while I take these patrons' photograph. What is more absurd, the endless waiting in line for bagels, or the one who Instagrams the wait?

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    A street fair on 91st.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Parisian charm on 74th. If only more of these buildings were preserved…

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Spider-Man's really blowing up on 68th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    "Invincible. Inspirational." 64th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    They've sure got all their bases covered. 51st.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Claustrophobia on 47th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Cacophonous overstimulation on stilts. Times Square, 46th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    45th. This was the first time I ever saw the Naked Cowboy in person.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Hello Kitty. Hello pity. 44th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    "Hot Stuff" on 36th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Herald Square: Not my first, nor my last choice, for a nap, but this industrious, weary citizen made it work on 35th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    28th. Despite being a native, it wasn't until this day that I realized there are fake Mister Softee's floating around the city, called Master Softees. However, this begs the question, "Which came first, Mister Softee, or Master Softee?"

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Our recent collaboration with Stromae, in the wild, on 26th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Flatiron, from 24th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Tippy top of Union Square at 17th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Sunday Strand scroungers on 12th.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    The only two sections of Broadway we found naturally overwhelming were Times Square and here, in Soho on Houston.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Canal. A flood of…this.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Spectacular graffiti on Walker.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Catherine Lane. Pretty name, wary look.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Another relic of New York's great architectural past: the Woolworth Building on Park Place.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    LET'S GO, METS. Dey St.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Trinity Church, Wall Street.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    We're being invaded, and not by tourists. Morris Street.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Steps before our completion, more oddities appear: a man feeding squirrels as they climb up his legs in Battery Park.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    C'est fini.

  • Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

    Our badass caravan of energetic New York–lovin' troupers.

Photograph: Sarah Mulligan

Starting from 230th Street in Manhattan (right on the border of the Bronx), me and my merry band of Manhattan ramblers traveled all the way down Broadway to the very bottom, ending at Battery Park. I chronicled my adventures along the way via Instagram with the hashtag #AllBroadwayOrBust, which could easily be changed to #AllBroadwayOrBus if we failed and used public transport the rest of the way.

Follow associate art director Sarah Mulligan on Instagram @smulligan for more photographic adventures around NYC.


Users say

0 comments

Send tips to:

Editor: Marley Lynch (@marleyasinbob)

marley.lynch@timeout.com

Subscribe to Time Out New York on Spotify for playlists and recommendations from our Music team.

Check out New York's best restaurants, hottest street style, cool apartments and more.