Holiday window secrets

Designers dish on their festive creations.

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  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

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    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

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  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

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    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman2

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman3

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman4

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman5

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

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    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman7

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman8

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    bergdorfgoodman9

    Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

bergdorfgoodman0

Bergdorf Goodman Holiday Windows 2010

Macy's | Henri Bendel | Lord & Taylor | Barneys | Saks Fifth Avenue | Bergdorf Goodman

Bergdorf Goodman
754 Fifth Ave at 57th St (212-753-7300, bergdorfgoodman.com). Through Jan 3.

The concept: When creating the travel-inspired motif "Wish You Were Here," window designer David Hoey was influenced by many sources, including Judy Garland films (look for nods to Meet Me in St. Louis and The Harvey Girls) and the work of Salvador Dal. Hoey's designs take about a year to come to fruition (sometimes more), a process that includes hashing out a concept, tracking down materials (from thrift and antiques stores, flea markets and even eBay) and actually constructing the displays.

The result: Each of the five main windows depicts a different mode of transportation: In one scene, a Victorian-looking flying contraption—made from bicycle parts and the remains of a vintage hot-air balloon—appears as if it's ready to take flight; in another, a nautical vignette is tilted on a 23-degree angle, evoking the rolling motion of a ship. Each set is crammed so full of antique maps, bicycle wheels and other whimsical items (which Hoey calls "unabashed maximalism") that you may need to do a double-take to absorb all the details.

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