IndieCade invades Queens

Get your mitts on the newest, weirdest and best video games at the annual expo

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  • Photograph: Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

    Night Games at IndieCade East

  • Photograph: Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

    IndieCade East

  • Photograph: Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

    Night Games at IndieCade East

  • Photograph: Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

    IndieCade East

  • Photograph: Ben Helmer

    "Indie Essentials: 25 Must-Play Video Games" at Museum of the Moving Image

  • Photograph: Ben Helmer

    Visitors playing SPACETEAM (2012) in the exhibiton "Indie Essentials: 25 Must-Play Video Games" co-presented by Museum of the Moving Image and IndieCade. On view at the Museum through March 2, 2014. Photo: Ben Helmer.

Photograph: Lauren Naefe / Museum of the Moving Image

Night Games at IndieCade East

Indie titles like Minecraft might not get the same headlines as the flashy new PlayStation console. Yet, the sandbox-style game, with primitive, blocky graphics and no objective goals, has sold more than 35 million copies. Increasingly, it’s been similarly resource-strapped developers that have taken the lead in creating innovative, challenging games (see recent breakouts Kentucky Route Zero and Journey). Now in its second year, IndieCade East—an outgrowth of the International Festival of Independent Games—is an ideal place to get a beat on the industry’s cutting edge. Here are the three things you won’t want to miss.

1. Play new social games with IRL friends

While some titles cater to maladjusted loners swearing into Xbox headsets, others like Wii Bowling or Rock Band foster incredible communal experiences. On Saturday 15 (7–10pm), Night Games champions the latter in a late-night buffet of unusual interfaces and spectacle-filled contests that think outside the button.

2. Hear from groundbreaking game designers

Creators Rami Ismail (Ridiculous Fishing), Bennett Foddy (QWOP) and Auriea Harvey (The Path) exist on the cutting edge of independent gaming and headline IndieCade East’s lecture offerings. Will this brave new world hold something more ridiculous than Ridiculous Fishing? Bet on it.

3. Get a first look at up-and-coming talent

Anyone with a game or a game-in-progress who wants to share it with the world (or at least the IndieCade world) can sign up on a first-come, first-served basis for a time slot at the Show and Tell showcase. The experience allows developers to get input from their peers and see how their creations respond to inquisitive players and hands-on testing. Hopefully they like our Yellow Snowsicle simulator.


IndieCade is at Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave at 37th St, Astoria, Queens (indiecade.com). Fri 14 10:30am–6:30pm, Sat 15 10:30am–10pm, Sun 16 10:30am–6:30pm. $35–$55, weekend pass $100–$125.


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