New plans unveiled for Domino Sugar development

Two Trees Management has released an updated proposal for the Williamsburg waterfront area, but are their changes enough to appease opponents?

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  • Domino Sugar Factory

    Domino Sugar Factory

    Domino Sugar Factory at present (courtesy Vivienne Gocwa via Flickr)

    Domino Sugar Factory
  • Domino Sugar Development

    Domino Sugar Development rendering

    Domino Sugar Development rendering, courtesy SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

    Domino Sugar Development
  • Domino Sugar Development

    Domino Sugar Development rendering

    Domino Sugar Development rendering, courtesy SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

    Domino Sugar Development
  • Domino Sugar Development

    Domino Sugar Development rendering

    Domino Sugar Development rendering, courtesy SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

    Domino Sugar Development

Domino Sugar Factory

Domino Sugar Factory

Domino Sugar Factory at present (courtesy Vivienne Gocwa via Flickr)

Construction and development projects in New York City always involve a fair share of drama, and the Domino Sugar development is no exception.


Back in 2004, C.P.C. Resources and Brooklyn developer Isaac Katan jointly purchased the property where the Domino Sugar factory currently sits, but the partnership soured and Two Trees Management eventually took control of the land in October of last year. We've yet to officially see or hear any of their plans—until today.


Two Trees, which spearheaded much of the development in nearby Dumbo in the 1980s and '90s, has called on SHoP Architects (Barclays Center, East River Esplanade) to design the forthcoming complex. The proposal encompasses 2,284 residential units, nearly 80,000 square feet of space for independent retailers and 630,000-plus square feet of office space. Most noticeable among the changes from the C.P.C.-Katan plan? An additional 533,000 square feet dedicated to professional workspace, taller buildings (the highest ascends 60 stories) and two more acres of public-park space. Also included in the agreement are 660 affordable-housing units—provided government subsidies come in as expected—and a public school.


The ideas being tossed around for the outdoor space sound tempting (everything from a beer garden and kayak launch to a farmers' market and community garden), but we've seen how easily these lofty goals disappear. What do you think of the Two Trees proposal? Would you want to live or hang out there?


Let us know in the comments and on Twitter (@timeoutnewyork) and peek at this group who did a (probably illegal?) photo safari in the abandoned structure.



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