New York's best things to do and places to go 2012

Our critics and readers have chosen the best things to do in NYC, including parties, shops, parks, live-music venues, shows and more. What are you waiting for?

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  • Photograph: Bob Berger

    New York's best things to do 2012

    Best private club you can drop in on: Bklyn Rod & Gun

  • Photograph: Paula Court

    New York's best things to do 2012

    Best dance in a museum (so far): Devotion Study #1—The American Dancer by Sarah Michelson

    Pictured: Sarah Michelson (b. 1964). Devotion, 2011

  • New York's best things to do 2012

    Best new theater hangout: Pershing Square Signature Center

     

  • New York's best things to do 2012

    Best place to remember when Brooklyn made big, not twee, things: BLDG 92

  • New York's best things to do 2012

    Best rush seats: The Metropolitan Opera House

  • Photograph: Irwin Seow

    New York's best things to do 2012

    Best indie-film series: Rooftop Films

  • New York's best things to do 2012

    Best street fair: Atlantic Antic

  • Photograph: Wayne Snellen

    New York's best things to do 2012

    Best place for gay culture: Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

Photograph: Bob Berger

New York's best things to do 2012

Best private club you can drop in on: Bklyn Rod & Gun

New York's best things to do 2012

Bklyn Rod & Gun

Best private club you can drop in on: Bklyn Rod & Gun

  • Critics choice

Soho House and Norwood are nice (or so we hear), but for our (lack of) money, we prefer this genuine fishing club in the wilds of Billyburg. The cozy cave of a venue has a unpretentious vibe and regularly hosts performances from local bluegrass combos. Check out the Oldtime Slow Jam every second and fourth Sunday; bring your banjo, mandolin, ukulele or guitar for an open session at 6pm, or watch the pros play at 7:30pm. • bklynrodandgun.com. By donation, members free.—Sophie Harris

  1. 59 Kent Ave between North 10th and 11th Sts, Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Best dance in a museum (so far): Devotion Study #1—The American Dancer by Sarah Michelson

  • Critics choice

The choreographer’s work at the Whitney Biennial was the high point of the current love affair between dance and museums; remarkably, it won the exhibit’s Bucksbaum Award over the work of a visual artist. Michelson created a landscape of movement on a stage painted with Marcel Breuer’s blueprints for the Whitney. Nicole Mannarino—in a bright blue jumpsuit, her arms outstretched like an angel’s wings—led this celestial folk dance while etching backward triplets throughout the space. See the unveiling of Devotion Study #3, staged in MoMA’s atrium as part of the institution’s dance series “Some sweet day” (11 W 53rd St between Fifth and Sixth Aves; 212-708-9400, moma.org; Sat 3 at 1pm; $25).—Gia Kourlas

Best new theater hangout: Pershing Square Signature Center

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

Designed by world-class architect Frank Gehry and collecting three unique, attractive stages under one roof, the Signature Theatre Company’s new home is one of the most exciting recent additions to the Off Broadway landscape. But it’s not just a playwrightcentric multiplex; you can grab a drink, have a preshow bite, or just meet a friend in the spacious and comfortable café-bar. The mood is relaxed but pleasant, whether you’re going to a show or dreaming of having your own work presented there.—David Cote

  1. 480 W 42nd St, (at Tenth Ave)
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Best place to remember when Brooklyn made big, not twee, things: BLDG 92

  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

Kings County’s reputation as the epicenter of all things artisanal and small-batch can overshadow the fact that the borough once produced war ships, submarines and other vessels for the U.S. Armed Forces. For evidence, visit this year-old museum on the grounds of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. In addition to spotlighting the Yard’s contributions to various war efforts, the small institution focuses on the future of the manufacturing base, which is undergoing a revitalization. —Amy Plitt

  1. 63 Flushing Ave, (at Carlton Ave)
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Best rush seats: The Metropolitan Opera House

  • Price band: 4/4
  • Critics choice

Many major New York cultural institutions offer great deals on rush tickets—for students. However, the Met Opera releases 150 prime orchestra seats to all and sundry for just $20 apiece two hours prior to curtain. The deal is on offer at every weeknight opera (except opening nights and galas). For $25 weekend tickets, enter an online lottery every Monday (10am–11:59pm).—Jonathan Shannon

  1. Lincoln Center Plaza, (at 65th St)
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New York's best things to do 2012: Best indie-film series: Rooftop Films

Best indie-film series: Rooftop Films

  • Critics choice

Throughout the spring, summer and fall, this series hosts more than 200 screenings in cool outdoor locations—rooftops, yes, but also parks and beaches. Unlike other alfresco fests, it’s focused largely on new under-the-radar offerings. Annual summertime highlights include the Animation Block Party in Williamsburg, which premieres envelope-pushing shorts, and free screenings on Coney Island Beach. • rooftopfilms.com—Tim Lowery

Best street fair: Atlantic Antic

  • Critics choice
  • Free

Street fairs can be the bane of a New Yorker’s existence. But this ten-block behemoth, which takes over the Brooklyn thoroughfare each fall, is no mere traffic nightmare; it’s a veritable community celebration, with local businesses, officials and artisans, and non-profits all setting up stalls. The festival also boasts far better food and drink options than your standard MozzArepas, including a Sixpoint beer brewed specifically for the occasion. • atlanticave.org—Amy Plitt

  1. Atlantic Ave between Fourth Ave and Hicks St, Brooklyn

Best place for gay culture: Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

  • Critics choice
  • Free

This queer art institution became the first state-chartered museum dedicated to the subject last year. Leslie-Lohman presents at least half a dozen major exhibits a year, and its vast permanent collection and library—consisting of more than 2,000 volumes—make it a vital archive of a highly overlooked demographic in mainstream art. Catch the current exhibit “Del LaGrace Volcano: A Mid-Career Retrospective” before it closes on November 11. • 212-431-2609, leslielohman.org. Tue–Sun noon–6pm; free.—Ethan LaCroix

  1. 26 Wooster St, (between Canal and Grand Sts)
More info


Users say

1 comments
bart boudrez
bart boudrez

Very well done,goos information about NY,like it