Renderings: These 15 images will show you the future of New York

See what's in store for our city's subway system, parks, museums and robots. (Okay, not robots—but we can dream!)

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  • TRANSPORTATION

    Happening soon: Two of the MTA’s Capital Construction projects are expected to be up and running this year (please, God): The Fulton Center (pictured), with its grand glass-and-steel dome, will officially open on June 26, while the 7-train extension to 34th Street and Eleventh Avenue should be in operation by fall. The new World Trade Center Transportation Hub—anchored by Santiago Calatrava’s swooping, birdlike Oculus—is scheduled to debut in 2015, with a mall, a new PATH station and connections to 11 subway lines.

  • Photograph: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin

    TRANSPORTATION

    Five years from now: Nearly cutting your midsection in half when you badly swipe your MetroCard may soon be a thing of the past: The MTA is working on a replacement for the blue-and-yellow transit pass that would employ contactless chip technology (on cards and smartphones) instead of the current magnetic strip. Meanwhile, the first phase of the Second Avenue subway (called the T, Boston’s similarly named transit system be damned) should be up and running by the end of 2016, connecting 63rd Street to 96th Street via the Q line. This photo shows construction on the 86th Street station.

  • Rendering: Diller, Scofidio + Renfro via Municipal Art Society

    TRANSPORTATION

    In the future: A new Penn Station could be in the works: Madison Square Garden’s lease is up in 2023, allowing for the possibility of a less-crappy train depot taking its place. The rendering above was created for the Municipal Art Society's design challenge last June. shows And the MTA’s oft-delayed East Side Access project—creating a Long Island Rail Road connection at Grand Central Terminal—is now on track to debut in 2020.

  • Rendering: courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper

    CULTURE

    Happening soon: More than a decade after it was first conceived, the completed 9/11 Memorial and Museum will open on May 21. Next year, the Whitney Museum will move from its boxy Upper East Side home to a sleek glass-and-steel Renzo Piano creation near the High Line. Plus, theatergoers will have a new Brooklyn stomping ground: The revamped St. Ann’s Warehouse will begin staging plays at its space, currently under construction at the Tobacco Warehouse in Dumbo, at the end of 2015.

  • CULTURE

    Five years from now: The 60-story New York Wheel, an observatory and Ferris wheel that will serve as the anchor of a new retail-entertainment complex on the Staten Island waterfront, will start terrifying visitors in late 2016. (Be prepared to pony up for the pleasure: Each 30-minute trip will cost around 30 bucks.) Across the harbor, the floating +POOL is anticipated to launch in 2016, bringing a swimming hole filled with filtered river water (less gross than it sounds, we promise) to the NYC coastline—whether it’ll land in the East River or the Hudson is still up in the air.

  • Photograph: © 2014 Diller Scofidio + Renfro

    CULTURE

    In the future: All eyes are on the Museum of Modern Art: Its controversial expansion plan, which calls for replacing the old American Folk Art Museum building with a skyscraper that will include 40,000 square feet of gallery space, is still in the beginning stages, with a planned unveiling in 2019.

  • Rendering: James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro

    PARKS

    Happening soon: Governors Island will open for its 2014 season in May with 30 acres of new parkland, including the utterly awesome Hammock Grove and the Play Lawn, the site of two new baseball fields. (Other amenities, like Slide Hill—which is exactly what it sounds like—won’t come to fruition until 2015. Darn!) In Manhattan, the first phase of the final section of The High Line, running from 30th to 34th Streets around what will eventually be Hudson Yards, debuts sometime this fall.

  • Rendering: MVVA

    PARKS

    Five years from now: The Lowline, one of the city’s most ambitious proposals—it’d bring a park to an abandoned Lower East Side trolley station—is still being planned, but its founders hope to launch by 2016. By that time, all of Brooklyn Bridge Park should also be finished: More revamped piers will debut this year, and the area around Main and John Streets, pictured here, should be completed by 2016.

  • Rendering courtesy Mayor's Office/Flickr

    PARKS

    In the future: Staten Island’s Freshkills Park is currently under construction on the remains of Fresh Kills, once the city’s largest dump; when it’s completed in 2035, it will become NYC’s biggest green space (and hopefully not its smelliest) as shown above. And while there’s no set opening date for the QueensWay yet, the proposal—to build an elevated, High Line–style park along an abandoned railway in Rego Park—has garnered plenty of interest, not to mention detractors, who think the site would be best used as, you know, a functional railroad. 

  • Rendering courtesy nARCHITECTS, copyright MIR

    HOUSING

    Happening soon: Modular units are all the rage: The long-awaited B2, the first of several units going up at Atlantic Yards, is scheduled for completion by the end of 2014. And construction has already begun on the winning plan from the city’s My Micro NY competition, in which designers dreamed up NYC’s first all-micro-unit building; the teeny apartments (all 375 square feet, tops) on 27th Street should be ready for occupancy next spring. See what it might look like in the rendering above.

  • Rendering courtesy SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

    HOUSING

    Five years from now: Mayor de Blasio is pushing for 200,000 affordable housing units to either be created or preserved in the next ten years. One possible victory in that fight: the Domino Sugar development in Williamsburg, which will now have 700 below-market units when it’s ready for occupancy.

  • Rendering: Related Cos. via Bloomberg

    HOUSING

    In the future: When Hudson Yards is completed in 2025, the city will have essentially created a new neighborhood: The massive, long-delayed development (shown here) includes housing, office space, new parks and the Culture Shed, a performing- and visual-arts space. Essex Crossing on the Lower East Side will serve a similar function, to a slightly lesser degree: Set to open on the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, it may boast housing, shopping and an Andy Warhol museum (yay!), with a projected opening date of 2023.

  • Rendering courtesy the Howard Hughes Corporation

    WATERFRONT

    Happening soon: The East Side of Manhattan is poised to look a whole lot different. After razing Pier 17 at South Street Seaport last year, the Howard Hughes Corporation will open a new shopping center, a marina, a movie theater and other amenities in its place by 2015. The rendering above depicts what that redevelopment might look like. And a portion of the proposed East River Esplanade, part of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway project, should also be open by then.

  • Rendering by WXY Architecture + Urban Design

    WATERFRONT

    Five years from now: The rebuilding of the Rockaway boardwalk is already under way, with the first phase (from Beach 86th to 97th Streets) set to debut in 2015; the whole thing, which will be elevated to minimize future flood damage, should be finished by 2017. Brooklyn Bridge Beach, a proposed man-made sand pit underneath the bridge’s Manhattan side, is expected to welcome sunbathers by 2016.

  • Rendering courtesy Atema Architecture and FLOW Collaborative

    WATERFRONT

    In the future: Say goodbye to that weird smell permeating parts of Brooklyn on hot days: The Superfund-designated, contaminated Gowanus Canal and Newtown Creek should be cleaned up by 2025. Proposals as to how to revamp the former include Atema Architecture's Street Creeks, an intricate system of gutters, cisterns and vegation that would prevent dirty water from running into the canal, pictured above. So yeah, hopefully no more traces of gonorrhea in the Gowanus waterway’s future.

TRANSPORTATION

Happening soon: Two of the MTA’s Capital Construction projects are expected to be up and running this year (please, God): The Fulton Center (pictured), with its grand glass-and-steel dome, will officially open on June 26, while the 7-train extension to 34th Street and Eleventh Avenue should be in operation by fall. The new World Trade Center Transportation Hub—anchored by Santiago Calatrava’s swooping, birdlike Oculus—is scheduled to debut in 2015, with a mall, a new PATH station and connections to 11 subway lines.


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Editor: Marley Lynch (@marleyasinbob)

marley.lynch@timeout.com

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