Street survey: Occupy Wall Street

We chatted with Wall Street protesters and other New Yorkers to find out why they're angry, and where else they would occupy in New York City.

0

Comments

Add +
  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Judy G., 63; retired social worker; Salida, CO

    "I've been here for four days. I couldn't not be here. The corporations own America; they're taking our homes, our jobs, everything. We need to reconfigure and reform the country, and since all we have now are our bodies, we have to use them. We don't have a future if we don't win."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Ibraheem A., 26, student, Middletown, NY

    "I've been here some mornings and evenings for ten days. I think people coming out sends a powerful message. The greatest influence on our government is the corporations and money. Voters have no voice. This gives people a chance to express their own individual perspectives and opinions in a public way."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Scales, 20, activist, midtown

    "I'm the librarian here. I think that the fact that we have a library really legitimizes the movement. Libraries throughout history have been centers for knowledge and information---nonbiased information. Plus, our library is entirely based on donations, which shows that the books we have are considered to be useful or valuable."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    (left) Michelle Z., 25; child-care director; Baltimore

    "We specifically came this weekend to support the global call to action. A lot of people's hardships aren't being heard, and our cases aren't being brought to justice. We do need to fight, and in some cases break laws and get arrested to get our points across. Voting isn't enough anymore."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    (right) Caitlin R., 27; administrative assistant for a nonprofit; Baltimore

    "In Times Square people had time to decide if they were going to be arrested or not. The cops gave ample warning, so the people who stayed were the ones who decided for themselves that they wanted to get arrested as a way to stand up for their right to peacefully protest. The Occupy movement has been inspired by what's going on globally---in Spain, in Iceland, even what happened in Wisconsin, although that was shut down. It left people feeling unresolved---they still want change."


  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Andrew P., 23, art student, East Village

    "I'd occupy the Museum of Modern Art. I'm an art student, and there's a lot of money involved there. People don't always realize how much of an institution it is in terms of financial decisions. They recently bought a tape made in the '70s or '80s of ants crawling all over Jesus Christ, but they paid millions of dollars for it. It's now a symbol of what modern art is, but who made that decision?"

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Stathis A., 53, professor of comparative literature, Morningside Heights

    "Occupy everywhere! The point is that people should feel comfortable in their neighborhoods and take to the streets. It'd be a much more formidable movement if people went out in the areas where they lived and occupied all their local parks. You'd notice that."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Mark R., 24, business developer, West Village

    "I'd occupy Washington Square Park, especially if it was like this every day. Sunday, 65 degrees, some jazz music playing in the background.... This is a great place to be. Wow, I think I just lost all my cynicism."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Gabriella D., 26, editorial assistant, West Village

    "I live around here, and I think that it'd be great to see a demonstration at Christopher Street--Sheridan Square. I was there when [the bill legalizing] same-sex marriage passed, and even though in this neighborhood it may be preaching to the converted, it was great to see such a public display of community and solidarity."

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    William M., 46, real-estate broker, Turtle Bay

    "I'd occupy Washington Square Park and the surrounding area. I love this neighborhood, but I hate what NYU has done with it. They bought up so much real estate that it's impossible to live here. Also, if I could get human beings to deal with nature a bit better it would be an improvement. When people leave trash everywhere and feed the squirrels and pigeons they domesticate them. They take the nature in the park for granted and forget that they should coexist."

Photograph: Alex Strada

Judy G., 63; retired social worker; Salida, CO

"I've been here for four days. I couldn't not be here. The corporations own America; they're taking our homes, our jobs, everything. We need to reconfigure and reform the country, and since all we have now are our bodies, we have to use them. We don't have a future if we don't win."

Users say

2 comments
Andrew Park
Andrew Park

Hey RB, you're a dweeb. You probably don't know anything about Socialism or the workings of class warfare and you probably haven't lived or travelled extensively in other countries. You probably watch too much Limbaugh. You probably aren't rich and you probably don't create jobs on a consistent basis. And you probably weren't around when the United States was "thriving". Now, these are all assumptions (similar to the kinds you made), but I'm certain about one thing: You have no imagination. These people were simply answering questions they were asked. Idiot.

RB
RB

Just like most other stories I've read about OWS, this was pointless. Most of these people don't know why they're here, they are just against "the rich" while taking advantage of all the conveniences and benefits that capitalism has brought to the world. Let them go live in a socialist 3rd world country and get government out of the way here so America can thrive again! This is class warfare, pure and simple. Question for OWS: What poor person ever gave you a job? Exactly.