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The best things to do this week in NYC

Find the biggest and best events, activities and things to do in New York City this week, as chosen by Time Out's editors

Photograph: Joseph Moran
Shakespeare in the Park

Lincoln Center Out of Doors

One of the great good things that New York does in the summer, this festival includes free offerings by major talents—don't miss Garth Fagan Dance on August 1st or Abakuá Afro-Latin Dance Company on August 6.

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Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center Until Sunday August 9 2015 Free

Rooftop Films

Critics' pick

For more than 15 years this outdoor gathering of indoor types (sorry, sorry, film buffs) has hosted screenings in a variety of creative locales—beaches, parks, plazas, farmland and roofs (duh). This year’s series will be held at seven al fresco spots including the Industry City complex in Sunset Park. There’s something about looking out over the city from up high, soaking in the skyline, that makes the experience much more, dare we say, cinematic. Programming runs the gamut from tried-and-true cult faves to world premieres. See site for specific times and locations.

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Location TBA Friday August 7 2015 - Friday August 14 2015

Warm Up at MoMA PS1

Critics' pick

After 18 years, MoMA PS1's Warm Up is bigger than ever, with music aficionados and sun-worshipping revelers flocking to the museum's courtyard to take in the top-tier lineup of bands, DJs and producers, along with the same great taste in art, beer and food it's boasted from the beginning.

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MoMA PS1 Until Saturday September 5 2015

Full Moon Fest 2015

Critics' pick

In its fifth year, Full Moon Fest—named for and modeled after the monthly all-night parties on the Thai island of Koh Phangan—moves from the sandy shores of Governors Island to the Superfund banks of East Williamsburg. But its not as depressing as it sounds: The fest is taking over a luxe new 53,000-square-foot indoor-outdoor space, dubbed Brooklyn Mirage. The spot consists of a massive warehouse, an outdoor courtyard, roof decks with sweeping views of Manhattan, some pretty festive decor (including palm trees and creeping vines), and food and drink options from local spots like Tacombi, Uma Temakeria and Carnal. The lineup features 15 eclectic midsize acts, including Germany’s melodic house monster Tensnake and French popster Yelle, as well as local deep house and funk stalwarts Soul Clap and Wolf+Lamb, who will pack their own Crew Love stage with affiliated artists.

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The Brooklyn Mirage Saturday August 1 2015

Deep Space

Critics' pick

Dance-music deity François K's weekly Deep Space soiree focuses on dub in all its glorious, echo-drenched forms but extends its reach to all types of underground dance music. The only dress code is "an open mind." If that's a stretch, the evening's futuristic vibes will set the tone.

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Cielo Monday August 3 2015 - Monday December 28 2015

NYC Restaurant Week Summer 2015

The bi-annual three-week-long food festival returns with three-course prix-fixe lunch ($25) and dinner ($38) at the city’s top restaurants. For a limited time, indulge at hit makers like Narcissa, Tavern on the Green and Bar Primi without breaking the bank.

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Various venues Until Friday August 14 2015

Elastic City Festival

Critics' pick

This annual free six-week festival made by and for artists and creative souls includes walks (artist-led collaborative city explorations), talks (interactive discussions with creators) and ways (intensive workshops). See elastic-city.org for specific times and locations, as well as a full list of participating artists.

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Various locations Until Tuesday August 18 2015 Free

Shakespeare in the Park

8pm. Delacorte Theater, Central Park at 81st St. As it did last summer, the Public Theatre is running two plays in repertory at the Delacorte. The grown-up fairy tale All’s Well That Ends Well, which follows resourceful Helena’s gambit to win the heart of snooty Count Bertram, is probably more kid-appropriate than Measure for Measure, which might be too raunchy and Machiavellian for children weaned on Elmo and Abby Cadabby. Ages 10 and up.

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Delacorte Theater Until Sunday August 23 2015 Free

Roots

Critics' pick

House heroes Louie Vega (of Masters at Work) and Kevin Hedge (of Blaze) have kept New York dance music alive and kicking for more than 10 years with their long-running midweek dance party. Show up before 11pm for free admission, plus an open vodka bar from 10 to 11pm!

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Cielo Wednesday August 5 2015 - Thursday December 31 2015

"Andy Warhol: Campbell’s Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967"

Critics' pick

On July 9, 1962, Andy Warhol made his one-person debut at a Los Angles gallery called Ferus, founded five years earlier by curator Walter Hopps and artist Edward Keinholz. It represented the first showing of Warhol's Campbell's Soup Can paintings, an image he became indelibly linked with. Often installed in a grid, they were originally hung in a single line at Ferus, an installation MoMA revives here in its look at Warhol's early years, when he turned the art world upside down.

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Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Until Monday October 12 2015

A Poem Is a Naked Person

Les Blank’s long-lost Leon Russell doc unfolds like a southern-fried Almost Famous that’s been stitched together from all the observations that a scripted film would leave out. Shot between 1972 and 1974 and buried for more than four decades after Russell balked at the final cut, this masterful collage works because Blank knows that the music is just
a rollicking good excuse to get together and be alive.—DE

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Amy

Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life of soul singer Amy Winehouse. Moving from Winehouse’s first steps into the music business in 2001 to her death in 2011 at just 27, Amy gives equal weight to her talent and the tragedy of its loss. Smartly, the film refuses to offer easy answers to explain her demise.—Dave Calhoun 

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Ant-Man

Marvel’s smallest origin story begins with scientist Hank Pym (Douglas), the inventor of a top-secret particle capable of shrinking ordinary objects down to insect size. Ousted from his own tech company, Hank needs a skilled stooge to break into his old lab and steal some research, and sweet-natured thief Scott Lang (Rudd) is the only man for the job. Rudd is inhibited in the role, as if he felt there was too much at stake, and that impulse to play it safe typifies a film that shrinks in the face of a challenge.—David Ehrlich

 

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Now Showing

Dope

Rick Famuyiwa’s comedy follows three high-school nerds who call Los Angeles’ frightening Inglewood home. It’s a euphorically funny indie that flips the script on Boyz n the Hood.

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Now Showing

Far From the Madding Crowd

Burning with understated passion and a fine central performance from Carey Mulligan, Thomas Hardy’s romantic classic comes to life in an adaptation that’s far from stodgy. 

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Infinitely Polar Bear

Line up now for Mark Ruffalo’s most complex and likable performance to date, as a mentally unstable parent who, despite frequent mood swings, must care for two rambunctious girls.

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Now Showing

Inside Out

Critics' pick

Pixar’s fun, near-experimental latest will have kids straining to listen to imaginary voices in their heads—those are the real stars of the movie: Joy (Poehler), Fear (Hader), Anger (Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but the animation studio once again turns childhood into the stuff of rare and riveting adventure.—DC

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Now Showing

Irrational Man

Woody Allen’s latest, a deadly straight drama, gives us Abe (Phoenix), a philosophy lecturer at a small East Coast college. Rita (Posey) is a fellow professor who wants to sleep with him, while student Jill (Stone) insists that her interest is purely platonic. It all feels pretty familiar for Woody: the tortured genius, the younger woman, the world closing in on our antihero. But there’s something sloppy about Irrational Man, even by Allen’s uneven standards.—DC

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Now Showing

Jurassic World

The slickly entertaining sequel has no reason for being (except for the obvious one), but at least it chomps your time painlessly. There’s a fully functioning tourist attraction on the haunted grounds of Isla Nublar some 22 years after the first film, complete with a Starbucks and huge crowds. Subtly—between generic action sequences—the movie celebrates money and itself, not science.—JR

 

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Love & Mercy

Beach Boy genius Brian Wilson loved being nestled in the recording studio, and to watch the delicate Paul Dano (a magically right choice with a beautiful voice) steer his ace session band through what would become Pet Sounds is to have a piece of rock history re-created right before your eyes. Wilson, a pop savant, was chasing some kind of dragon, and as the movie toggles years forward to the scared, overmedicated Wilson of the 1980s (Cusack, absorbingly strange in the tougher part), you sense that the dragon bit back.—JR

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Now Showing
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Michelle Segre, “Porous, Porous”

It’s hard to pin down Segre’s work, though her mixed-media sculptures do appear to contain bits of DNA from the work of Alexander Calder and David Smith: She combines the former’s surreal whimsy with the latter's  penchant for composing objects pictorially—less in the round than as flattened forms suspended in space. Though Segre also creates drawings that often achieve an almost psychedelic busyness, the pieces presented in this 24/7 MePA storefront showcase are sculptural. The fact that they can only be viewed from the street like a window display emphasizes their interplay between two and three dimensions.

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55 Gansevoort Until Sunday August 9 2015 Free

“Titus Kaphar: Selections from Asphalt and Chalk”

Kaphar’s chalk drawings on asphalt paper picture the faces of young African-American men layered one on top of the other, creating eerie multiplications of facial features that make them seem alien, somehow. The source for these for images are highly personally: His father Jerome had been incarcerated, and while researching his dad’s time in jail, the artist came across mug shots of men also named Jerome. Using this discovery as a jumping off point, Kaphar’s portrayals powerfully depict these subjects as pawns caught up in a system of white supremacy that refuses to differentiate them as individuals.

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MoMA PS1 Until Monday August 31 2015

“Eureka”

Cosmology, metaphysics and science provide inspiration for the works in this far-out group show, which includes Tim Hawkinson’s basket-weave model of a wormhole, Alfred Jensen’s numerology-based painting and Julie Mehretu’s schematically nebulous canvas. Space is the place.

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Pace Gallery Monday August 3 2015 - Friday August 14 2015 Free

Niele Toroni

Born near the Italian Alps in Muralto, Switzerland in 1937, Toroni was part of a generation of ’60s European minimalist painters who adopted strict sets of rules to create their work. In Toroni’s case that meant airy, all-over patterned compositions made by applying a series of the same short brushstroke, spaced the same distance apart in all directions—an arrangement that produced a sort staggered grid with each interstice separated by a generous amount of  space. While limited, this approach afforded a surprisingly wide range of variations in terms of shape, color, scale and format, including works executed on paper, fabric and in some instances,  directly onto walls as site-specific murals. This pocket survey provides a brief précis of the artist’s 50-year career. 

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Swiss Institute Until Sunday September 6 2015

“Bronx Calling: The Third AIM Biennial”

The Bronx’s Museum’s AIM (Artist In the Marketplace) showcase presents a selection of works by up-and-coming artists who’ve participated in the museum’s two-year AIM program. This year’s round-up is as lively as ever, providing a must-seen opportunity for anyone looking to catch the art stars of tomorrow.

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Bronx Museum of the Arts Until Sunday September 20 2015 Free

Comments

9 comments
Chris O
Chris O

Is anyone going to any of these? Possibly in Brooklyn? 

Cecily O
Cecily O

"Drinking with Dorothy" is at the Player's Theatre, Macdougal St. on June 5 & 6 at 10pm. Tickets : $12. 

Based on Dorothy Parker's stories, this in an evening of alcohol-fuelled romance and music, presented by 2Time Theatre.

Claire B
Claire B

Basque Cider House is this Sunday at Txikito! Michelin rated James Beard nominated Chefs prepare a Curated dinner highlighting Basque cultural appreciation through specially crafted Ciders and Art including projections and documentary film. Eder Montero, Alex Raij, Emily Lobsenz and Leah Rinaldi invited me to unique experience of a tradition. This Sunday, March 29th at 6, Totally worth sharing!

Mark W
Mark W

The BEST, and longest-running, Dueling Pianos show in NYC - SHAKE RATTLE & ROLL DUELING PIANOS - 10pm every Saturday night.  All request rock n roll party.  Part concert, part cabaret, part comedy - all fun!


The Cellar @ 22 Warren St. NYC 10007

www.ShakeRattleRollPianos.com for tix and info!

Beatrice B
Beatrice B

Have to see Queen. Lambert is no impersonator! I saw them in Chicago and again in Vegas, now MSG. This show deserves a 4 star !!! That if you like great music and a front man with an amazing voice and commands the stage. Its like hearing Queen for the first time . Go see this show, if you can get seats !

Blair Y
Blair Y

how about the Spike Lee block party in Brooklyn...