0 Love It
Save it

Museums and art galleries around the Champs-Elysee and Louvre

The Louvre

Critics' choice

Read Time Out's review of The Louvre below or click here for our exclusive photo tour of the museum. The world's largest museum is also its most visited, with an incredible 8.8 million visitors in 2011. It is a city within the city, a vast, multi-level maze of galleries, passageways, staircases and escalators. It's famous for the artistic glories it contains within, but the very fabric of the museum is a masterpiece in itself - or rather, a collection of masterpieces modified and added to from one century to another. And because nothing in Paris ever stands still, the additions and modifications continue into the present day, with the opening of a major new Islamic Arts department 2012, and the franchising of the Louvre 'brand' via new outposts in Lens (www.louvrelens.fr) and Abu Dhabi. If any place demonstrates the central importance of culture in French life, this is it.Some 35,000 works of art and artefacts are on show, split into eight departments and housed in three wings: Denon, Sully and Richelieu. Under the atrium of the glass pyramid, each wing has its own entrance, though you can pass from one to another. Treasures from the Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks and Romans each have their own galleries in the Denon and Sully wings, as do Middle Eastern and Islamic art. The first floor of Richelieu is taken up with European decorative arts from the Middle Ages up to the 19th century, including room after room of Napoleon III's lavish apartments.The main draw, though, is the pa

Read more
1st arrondissement

Galerie-Musée Baccarat

Critics' choice

Philippe Starck has created a neo-rococo wonderland in the former mansion of the Vicomtesse de Noailles. From the red carpet entrance with a chandelier in a fish tank to the Alchemy room, decorated by Gérard Garouste, there's a play of light and movement that makes Baccarat's work sing. See items by designers Georges Chevalier and Ettore Sottsass, services made for princes and maharajahs, and monumental items made for the great exhibitions of the 1800s.If you want to eat at the opulent Le Cristal Room restaurant (01.40.22.11.10), be warned that there's a long waiting list.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée Dapper

Named after the 17th-century Dutch humanist Olfert Dapper, the Fondation Dapper began as an organisation dedicated to preserving sub-Saharan art. Reopened in 2000, the venue created by Alain Moatti houses a performance space, bookshop and café. Each year it stages two African-themed exhibitions.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée National Jean-Jacques Henner

During his lifetime, Jean-Jacques Henner (1829-1905) was one of France's most respected artists, winning multiple prizes and official state honours. While the Impressionists were revolutionising the rules of painting in the late 19th century, Henner was carving himself out a sturdy reputation as a talented landscape painter and exceptional portraitist. Reopened in 2009 after four years of renovation work, the museum traces the artist's life from his humble beginnings in Alsace to his rise as one of the most sought-after painters in Paris. Although he never lived here, the building was the home and studio of his contemporary, Guillaume Dubufe, and the interiors have been widely refurbished to recreate the feel of the period. A Chinese-style fireplace on the ground floor and Egyptian mashrebeeyah in the striking red-walled studio testify to the eclectic tastes of the time, while many of the furnishings belonged to Henner himself. The closure of the museum also allowed the paintings themselves to be cleaned and restored, a process not helped by Henner's predilection for unusual raw materials, such as the top of a cigar box. The works are now spread across the museum's three compact floors in loosely chronological order. On the first floor, Alsatian landscapes and family portraits are a reminder of the artist's lifelong attachment to his native region. The annexation of Alsace-Lorraine to Germany in 1871 prompted Henner to paint one of his most famous works, L'Alsace. Elle at

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée National de la Marine

Critics' choice

Sail back in time through 400 years of French naval history. Highlights include the Océan, a 19th-century sailing vessel equipped with an impressive 120 cannons; a gilded barge built for Napoleon; and some extravagant, larger-than-life figureheads, from serene-faced angels to leaping seahorses. There are also dozens of model boats, dating from the 18th to the 20th century, and several old-fashioned divers' suits.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée Nissim de Camondo

Put together by Count Moïse de Camondo, this collection is named after his son Nissim, who was killed in World War I. Moïse replaced the family's two houses near Parc Monceau with this palatial residence and lived here in a style in keeping with his love of the 18th century. Grand first-floor reception rooms are filled with furniture by craftsmen of the Louis XV and XVI eras, silver services, Sèvres and Meissen porcelain, Savonnerie carpets and Aubusson tapestries.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée Nissim de Camondo

Put together by Count Moïse de Camondo, this collection is named after his son Nissim, who was killed in World War I. Moïse replaced the family's two houses near Parc Monceau with this palatial residence and lived here in a style in keeping with his love of the 18th century. Grand first-floor reception rooms are filled with furniture by craftsmen of the Louis XV and XVI eras, silver services, Sèvres and Meissen porcelain, Savonnerie carpets and Aubusson tapestries.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Musée Galliera

This look at clothes through history takes an academic approach to its subject. Housed in a hôtel particulier built by Eiffel, the Galliera has a huge costume collection. It has links with the fashion industry, and its initiative with young designers shows innovative work.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Palais de la Découverte

Critics' choice

This science museum houses designs dating from Leonardo da Vinci's time to the present. Models, real apparatus and audiovisual material bring displays to life, and permanent exhibits cover astrophysics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. The Planète Terre section highlights meteorology, and one room is dedicated to the sun. There are shows at the Planetarium too.

Read more
Champs Élysées and western Paris

Pinacothèque de Paris

At Place de la Madeleine, renowned for its luxury food boutiques and designer shops, every square metre of real estate is so sought after you’d never think there would be room enough for a large museum.  So imagine Paris’ surprise when, in 2007, the Crédit Agricole bank decided to turn their office block at 28 place de la Madeleine into the Pinacothèque – a 5000m2 art museum, dedicated to expression through the ages, displaying everything from archaeological finds to contemporary art. It was a risky move, but one that has ultimately paid off: Since opening roughly five years ago, the museum has reeled in over 2 million visitors by offering a wide variety of artworks rarely shown in France. Artists Roy Lichtenstein, Chaïm Soutine and Jackson Pollack have all had retrospectives, for instance, and treasures such as China’s Xi’an Dynasty warrior statues and gold from the Incas have also been displayed. In short, the Pinacothèque has fast become an appealing option if you can’t face the crowds at behemoths like the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay and Centre Pompidou. And, aside from its ever-changing world-class exhibitions, the museum (whose name derives from pinacothêkê in Greek – meaning “box of paintings”) has fittingly acquired a new building just opposite (at 8 rue Vignon) and an impressive permanent collection of a hundred or so paintings on loan from private collectors.  Set over 800m2 you’ll find masterworks by artists like Van Dyck, Monet, Modigliani, Delacroix and Pollack, some o

Read more
Madeleine
Show more

Comments

0 comments