Restaurants near Opéra and the Grands Boulevards

Our recommendations for the best restaurants near Opéra and the Grands Boulevards

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  • Photo tour: Opéra restaurants

    The restaurants around Opéra and the Grands Boulevards are all glitz and glamour. Click on the arrow above to start exploring some of our favourites. Think we've missed a great restaurant near Opéra and the Grands Boulevards? Let us know in the comment box below.

     

    Photo tour: Opéra restaurants
  • Pirouette

    A restaurant called Pirouette suggests both deft maneuvering and a dash of panache. Set in a secluded little courtyard behind the concrete mess of Les Halles in the 1st arrondissement, the stage set for the meal is immediately promising, so shiny new behind its huge plate glass window that the first thing you notice as you walk in is the fresh smell of the wood pannelling. So, with a swift arabesque, to the menu, which includes a formule  for a mere €36. We started with a perfect coddled egg on a bed of greens, over which a subtle mushroom and chestnut was poured at the table, and the ‘alouette sans tête’ (headless lark), a fanciful name for a ‘paupiette’ (stuffed piece of meat) of pigeon and foie gras enriched with lardo di Colonnata.

    For more info, click here.

     

    Pirouette
  • Happa Tei

    © Time Out

    The red façade and long waiting line that front Happa Tei are a familiar sight to habitués of the Rue Saint-Anne. Amid the trendy Japanese restaurants and bars that line the street, this chaotic little establishment is a bastion of unfussy Osaka-style cuisine, namely okonomiyaki (omelette-cum-pancakes) and takoyaki (fried octopus balls).

    You need only take one look at the floor-level tables on the left as you walk in to know that authenticity reigns supreme in Happa Tei; this goes for the food as well as the layout, and we can report that the chefs do what they do better than practically anywhere else in Paris. The dishes are as succulent as they are scalding, and make for a refreshing break from rarefied plates of sashimi – the big egg and meat pileup that is an okonomiyaki will fill the emptiest of stomachs, and for only €15-20. On this basis, it's time for Osakan cuisine to have its day in the sun.

    Happa Tei
  • Café Marly

    In the arcaded terrace overlooking the Louvre’s glass pyramid, this classy, Napoleon III-style hangout (reached through the passage Richelieu, the entrance for advance Louvre ticket holders) is in an unrivalled location. One would expect nothing else from the ubiquitous Costes brothers – it’s just a shame about the beer prices. It’s €6 for a Heineken, so you might as well splash out €12 on a chocolate martini, or perhaps a Shark (vodka, lemonade and grenadine). Most wines are under €10 a glass, and everything is impeccably served by razor-sharp staff. Brasserie fare and sandwiches are on offer too.

    For more info, please click here.

    Café Marly
  • Drouant

    Star chef Antoine Westermann has whisked this landmark 1880 brasserie into the 21st century with bronze-coloured banquettes and butter-yellow fabrics. Westermann has dedicated this restaurant to the art of the hors d'oeuvre: they're served in themed sets of four ranging from the global (Thai beef salad with brightly coloured vegetables, coriander, and a sweet and spicy sauce) to the nostalgic (silky leeks in vinaigrette). The bite-sized surprises continue with the main course accompaniments – four of them for each dish – and the multiple mini-desserts.

    For more info, please click here.

    Drouant
  • Frenchie

    Grégory Lemarchand honed his craft with Jamie Oliver in London before opening this loft-style bistro next to the market street rue Montorgueil. It has been an instant hit thanks to the bold flavours of dishes such as gazpacho with calamari, squash blossoms and plenty of herbs; braised lamb with roasted aubergine and spinach; and coconut tapioca with strawberry sorbet. Be sure to book several days ahead.

    For more info, please click here.

    Frenchie
  • Harry's New York Bar

    In 1911, a New Yorker dismantled his Manhattan bar, only to rebuild it stone for stone on Paris’s Rue Daunou. Writers like Hemingway, Sartre and Blondin drank signature cocktails here, Bloody Marys and White Ladies. This landmark for Americans has everything that you would expect from an authentic pub from across the pond – a classic décor, a menu of almost 300 whiskies, and oceans of different beers. A century later, it owes its success to its reputation and to the deep pockets of the tourists who pass here, near to the Opéra area. Certain mixes are worth the trip, like the superlative Harry’s Pick Me Up (a mix of Grand Marnier and cognac, champagne and orange juice) or the exotic Blue Lagoon (vodka, blue curacao and grapefruit juice). The barmen can also make you up a personalised concoction at the underground piano bar, where Gershwin composed the tune ‘An American in Paris’ and where jazz concerts are held every Thursday and Friday nights. It’s a shame about the slightly touristy atmosphere of the area, but we are in Opéra after all. Open until 3am at the weekends.

    For more info, please click here.

     

    Harry's New York Bar
  • Kaï

    This restaurant has developed a following among fashionable diners. The 'Kaï-style' sushi is a zesty take on a classic: marinated and lightly grilled yellowtail is pressed on to a roll of shiso-scented rice. Not to be outdone, the grilled aubergine with miso, seemingly simple, turns out to be a smoky, luscious experience. A generous main of breaded pork lacks the finesse and refinement of the starters, but is still satisfying. Thoroughly French desserts come courtesy of celebrity pastry chef Pierre Hermé.

    For more info, please click here.

    Kaï
  • L'Ardoise

    One of the city's finest modern bistros, L'Ardoise attracts gourmets eager to sample Pierre Jay's reliably delicious cooking. A wise choice might be six oysters with warm chipolatas and a pungent shallot dressing; equally attractive are a gamey hare pie with an escalope of foie gras nestling in its centre. A lightly chilled, raspberry-scented Chinon is a perfect complement. Unusually, it's open on Sundays.

    For more info, please click here.

    L'Ardoise
  • La Bourse ou la Vie

    After a career as an architect, the round-spectacled owner of La Bourse ou la Vie has a new mission in life: to revive the dying art of the perfect steak-frites. The only decision you'll need to make is which cut of beef to order with your chips, unless you pick the cod. Choose between ultra-tender coeur de filet or a huge, surprisingly tender bavette. Rich, creamy pepper sauce is the speciality here, but the real surprise is the chips, which gain a distinctly animal flavour from the suet in which they are cooked.

    For more info, please click here.

    La Bourse ou la Vie
  • Le Fumoir

    There aren't many places around the Louvre that can compete with this elegant local institution: neo-colonial fans whirr lazily and oil paintings adorn the walls. A sleek crowd sips martinis or reads papers at the long mahogany bar (originally from a Chicago speakeasy), giving way to young professionals in the restaurant and pretty things in the library. It feels a wee bit try-hard and resolutely well behaved, but the cocktails get tongues wagging soon enough, and food is consistently top notch.

    For more info, please click here.

     

    Le Fumoir
  • Le Meurice

    With its extravagant Louis XVI decor, mosaic tiled floors and modish restyling by Philippe Starck, Le Meurice is looking grander than ever. All 160 rooms (kitted out with iPod-ready radio alarms) are done up in distinct historical styles; the Belle Etoile suite on the seventh floor provides panoramic views of Paris from its terrace. You can relax in the Winter Garden to the strains of regular jazz performances; for more intensive intervention, head over to the lavishly appointed spa with treatments by Valmont.

    For more info, please click here.

    Le Meurice
  • Le Tambour

    Banal during the day, Le Tambour is the late-night haunt of all the neighbourhood’s night owls and insomniacs, staying open until six in the morning. The atmosphere is warm, though it can get a little crazy between the drinkers draped over the bar and the gruff, strapping barmen. But it’s always fun mixing in with this eccentric nightlife – more often than not you feel like you’re in a sailor’s tavern, decorated with a jumble of salvaged road signs, rather than in a bar in the centre of Paris. Here, you can satisfy any cravings for andouillette,a malodorous intestine sausage, for pig’s feet or simply for steak, at any hour of the day or night. To go with these rustic dishes, order a box or a bottle of wine à la ficelle (you only pay for what you drink). As you’d expect, the low prices increase slightly in the early hours.

    For more info, please click here.

    Le Tambour
  • Liza

    Liza Soughayar's restaurant showcases the style and superb food of contemporary Beirut. Lentil, fried onion and orange salad is delicious, as are the kebbe (minced seasoned raw lamb) and grilled halloumi cheese with home-made apricot preserve. Main courses such as minced lamb with coriander-spiced spinach and rice are light, flavoursome and well presented. Try one of the excellent Lebanese wines to accompany your meal, and finish with the halva ice-cream with carob molasses.

    For more info, please click here.

     

    Liza
  • Café de la Paix

    Lap up every detail – this is once-in-a-holiday stuff. Whether you're out on the historic terrace or looking up at the ornate stucco ceiling, you'll be sipping in the footsteps of the likes of Oscar Wilde, Josephine Baker, Emile Zola, and Bartholdi and the Franco-American Union (as they sketched out the Statue of Liberty). Let the immaculate staff bring you a kir (€12) or, for an afternoon treat, the vanilla millefeuille – possibly the best in Paris.

    For more info, please click here.

    Café de la Paix
  • Little Fernand

    © Time Out

    Meuh! Rrrrr! Bzzzz! Bêêêê! Thus reads the menu at Little Fernand, the upstart progeny of fast food success Big Fernand. While you might be unfamiliar with French farm animal noises (in English: Moo! Grrrr! Bzzzz! Baaaa!), you’ll have no trouble with the product. While Fernand senior concentrates on gourmet burgers, the focus here is all luxuriously pimped hot dogs, rolling in quality goat’s cheese, Fourme d’Ambert and Vache Qui Rit.

    For more info, click here.

     

    Little Fernand

Photo tour: Opéra restaurants

The restaurants around Opéra and the Grands Boulevards are all glitz and glamour. Click on the arrow above to start exploring some of our favourites. Think we've missed a great restaurant near Opéra and the Grands Boulevards? Let us know in the comment box below.

 


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